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Radical Change

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2002
Now I know why producers are regarded as Philistines. In the article about "Rollerball," ("The Way 'Rollerball' Bounces," by Richard Natale, Feb. 6), Charles Roven says removing a Rebecca Romijn-Stamos nude scene was "not radical"? Duuuuuude! DICK EAGLESON Gardena
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BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
Microsoft is widely expected next week to appoint a longtime insider to be only its third chief executive, signaling the company won't make radical strategic changes. Satya Nadella, 46, who joined Microsoft in 1992, is executive vice president of Microsoft's Cloud and Enterprise group, working primarily with business customers. Although his division posted more than $20 billion in revenue last year, making it larger than most other tech companies, analysts said he faces a huge challenge in assuming control of the sprawling Microsoft business.
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NEWS
March 17, 1992
Less than a year after multi-party elections ended half a century of dictatorship, Albanians will be asked again Sunday whether they want the Socialist status quo or radical change. Despite rampant poverty and hunger, voter sentiments are difficult to gauge. Parliamentary elections on March 31, 1991, gave the renamed Communists majority control and a public mandate as voters spurned the opposition Democratic Party's promises of free-market reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
He had already been proclaimed "the Picasso of children's books" by Time magazine when Maurice Sendak, then in his 30s, wrote and illustrated "Where the Wild Things Are," a dark fantasy that became one of the 10 bestselling children's books of all time. Published in 1963, the book was a startling departure from the sweetness and innocence that then ruled children's literature. "Wild Things" tapped into the fears of childhood and sent its main character — an unruly boy in a wolf costume — into a menacing forest to tame the wild beasts of his imagination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2001
In "Blacks Want Out of the Nation's Failed Schools" (Commentary, April 22) Arianna Huffington cites a Newark city councilman's warning that "we're not going to fix our schools by tinkering with them. It's going to take radical changes, and we have to be willing to experiment by any means necessary--including with vouchers." Vouchers do not address the challenge meaningfully. A radical change would be to fix our crumbling school buildings. In 2000 a National Education Assn. study said that America's public schools need $112 billion for repair and modernization.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Communist Party on Saturday proposed reforms that would transform the country's highly centralized political and economic system into one based on federalism with extensive freedoms for its constituent republics and regions. A crucial element in the broad reforms now under way here, the move will reshape the Soviet Union, according to the party's policy document on ethnic issues, and it calls for extensive negotiations to reach a new constitutional formula for the country.
WORLD
October 3, 2003 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
In an unusually critical response to a new U.S. draft resolution on Iraq, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan issued an ultimatum Thursday: Either give the United Nations a leading role in the nation's political transition or the world body won't be involved in Iraq at all. Steeled by two attacks on the U.N.'s Baghdad headquarters in a month, Annan said that a new resolution must provide "a radical change" that could safeguard the U.N.'s staff and the mission's independence from the U.S.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, replying to mounting criticism that his reforms are worsening the Soviet Union's political, economic and ethnic problems, on Tuesday defended perestroika as achieving more in five years than past Communist Party leaders had in previous decades.
NEWS
August 21, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's new prime minister, Morihiro Hosokawa, played tennis on a recent Saturday. At a news conference not long ago, he minced few words. He favors modest eateries and removes his parliamentary lapel pin when he leaves the office. So what? To many Americans, perhaps, that may seem run-of-the-mill behavior. But in Japanese political circles, it's radical stuff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2007 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
At United Teachers Los Angeles, veteran classroom instructors Joel Jordan and Joshua Pechthalt were longtime outsiders, considered a bit too radical for a union long known for its progressive politics. Now, as leaders at the nation's second-largest teachers union, they are applying their ideas in ways that could reshape Southern California's politics and schools. On Tuesday came the largest practical demonstration of the union's new approach to date: a three-year union contract.
SPORTS
August 9, 2011 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
A German toe has been dipped into the shallow pool of American soccer talent and has come up, well, all wet. Those who have been clamoring for radical change in the makeup of the U.S. national team will be a tad disappointed at the roster pieced together for Wednesday night's friendly against Mexico in Philadelphia. Instead of throwing the baby out with the bathwater, new Coach Juergen Klinsmann has resisted making sweeping changes and has set about his task in a measured, methodical manner.
NATIONAL
September 21, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
The rising threat from homegrown radicals makes terrorist plots against the U.S. harder to detect and more likely to succeed, top administration officials are scheduled to tell Congress on Wednesday. In written testimony to be delivered before the Senate Homeland Security Committee, FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and Michael E. Leiter, chief of the National Counterterrorism Center, each say terrorist threats have become more complex, with a greater array of plotters inspired by Al Qaeda without necessarily being directly linked to the terrorist network.
OPINION
February 4, 2010 | By Lawrence Lessig
We are now one year into the Obama presidency, and it is already clear that this administration is an opportunity missed: Not because it is too conservative or too liberal, but because it is too conventional. President Obama has given up the rhetoric of his early campaign, which promised to "fundamentally change the way Washington works." Obama once decried allowing "lobbyists and campaign contributions to rig the system." The reason he was running, he said, was "to challenge that system."
SCIENCE
May 14, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
A 40,000-year-old figurine of a voluptuous woman carved from mammoth ivory and excavated from a cave in southwestern Germany is the oldest known example of three-dimensional or figurative representation of humans and sheds new light on the origins of art, researchers reported Wednesday. The intricately carved headless figure is at least 5,000 years older than previous examples and dates from shortly after the arrival of modern humans in Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2007 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
At United Teachers Los Angeles, veteran classroom instructors Joel Jordan and Joshua Pechthalt were longtime outsiders, considered a bit too radical for a union long known for its progressive politics. Now, as leaders at the nation's second-largest teachers union, they are applying their ideas in ways that could reshape Southern California's politics and schools. On Tuesday came the largest practical demonstration of the union's new approach to date: a three-year union contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2006 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
Imagine a math and science high school with lab classes conducted by staff from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Or a high school of the arts with access to the stages of the Pasadena Playhouse and the exhibits of the Huntington Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2003
DANCE Flamenco in flux The art of flamenco is in a period of radical change, as the "Ay! Flamenco" program demonstrates. Page 4 WORLD MUSIC Mixed bag Oi-Va-Voi and Mia Serra are standouts at the Skirball Cultural Center's Dis/Orient concert. Page 14 DVD Gotta dance Some good, bad and downright ugly vintage musicals make their debuts. Page 16 *--* Astrology...20 Letters...12 Bridge...20 Quick Takes...2 Comics...19-21 Radio...21 Crossword...20 TV Grid...22 *--*
OPINION
February 14, 2006
Re "A Solution for Solvency Need Not Be Radical, Just Bipartisan," Feb. 12 It is evident that Ronald Brownstein will not need Social Security or Medicare. Otherwise, he wouldn't claim that the ridiculous idea of raising the age of eligibility for Social Security by indexing it to the increase in life expectancy has merit. Just because a male may live to 78 or 79 does not mean he will be capable of working at the job he had in his 40s. This is just a trick to rob Americans of money that is rightfully theirs.
OPINION
February 14, 2006
Re "A Solution for Solvency Need Not Be Radical, Just Bipartisan," Feb. 12 It is evident that Ronald Brownstein will not need Social Security or Medicare. Otherwise, he wouldn't claim that the ridiculous idea of raising the age of eligibility for Social Security by indexing it to the increase in life expectancy has merit. Just because a male may live to 78 or 79 does not mean he will be capable of working at the job he had in his 40s. This is just a trick to rob Americans of money that is rightfully theirs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2005 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
CBS chairman and CEO Leslie Moonves caused a stir last week by suggesting that his network may soon institute radical change at its scandal-tarnished news division. With "CBS Evening News" anchor Dan Rather set to retire March 9, Moonves said, network executives are looking to reinvent the traditional single-anchor newscast to make it "younger, more relevant." He even played coy with the possibility of a role for Comedy Central host Jon Stewart, the king of fake newscasters.
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