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November 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Carlos Saul Menem, the architect of Argentina's economic recovery, won his battle to be allowed to run for a second term and scrapped a plebiscite on the question planned for next Sunday. Menem and his predecessor, Raul Alfonsin of the opposition Radical Civic Union, met, hugged and signed a paper drafted earlier by their aides to clear the way for a reform of Argentina's 140-year-old constitution, which currently bars consecutive terms.
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NEWS
November 15, 1993 | From Reuters
President Carlos Saul Menem, the architect of Argentina's economic recovery, Sunday won his battle to be allowed to run for a second term and scrapped a plebiscite on the question planned for next Sunday. Menem and his predecessor, Raul Alfonsin of the opposition Radical Civic Union, met, hugged and signed a paper drafted earlier by their aides to clear the way for a reform of Argentina's 140-year-old constitution, which currently bars consecutive terms. "I'm extremely pleased.
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NEWS
September 8, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin of Argentina faced the discouraging prospect Monday of diminished legislative support for his ambitious government programs after losing a lower-house majority in congressional elections. While weakening Alfonsin's four-year-old administration, the Sunday elections gave new strength to the labor-based Justicialist (Peronist) Party, Argentina's second political force.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Argentine President Raul Alfonsin announced Monday night that he will resign June 30, five months before his term expires, to allow his Peronist successor to begin confronting an unprecedented economic crisis. However, President-elect Carlos Saul Menem indicated early today that he might not accept the quick handover, calling Alfonsin's announcement "surprising." Menem huddled with his Cabinet appointees to discuss Alfonsin's unilateral declaration. In resolving to step down and hand over power to Menem, Alfonsin said that in light of the severe economic problems facing the country, "any delay will bring greater suffering."
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Argentine President Raul Alfonsin announced Monday night that he will resign June 30, five months before his term expires, to allow his Peronist successor to begin confronting an unprecedented economic crisis. However, President-elect Carlos Saul Menem indicated early today that he might not accept the quick handover, calling Alfonsin's announcement "surprising." Menem huddled with his Cabinet appointees to discuss Alfonsin's unilateral declaration. In resolving to step down and hand over power to Menem, Alfonsin said that in light of the severe economic problems facing the country, "any delay will bring greater suffering."
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin was distressed and discouraged after his party took a beating in Argentina's congressional and provincial elections in September. Officials denied rumors that he was thinking of resigning, but it was clear that the president's spirits were low. Now, political analysts say, Alfonsin's darkest moment has passed, and he is facing the formidable problems of his administration with renewed buoyancy.
NEWS
February 19, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
With its attempts to control Argentina's galloping inflation an apparent failure, President Raul Alfonsin's economics team resigned en masse Monday night in a move that caught the nation by surprise. A presidential spokesman said Alfonsin has accepted the resignations of Economics Minister Bernardo Grinspun and Central Bank President Enrique Garcia Vazquez.
NEWS
January 22, 1986 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Striking with the sudden ferocity of a summer squall, social unrest is buffeting the reformist government of President Raul Alfonsin. International applause for Alfonsin's effort to rein in inflation is being drowned out by domestic protest from left and right. Alfonsin's economics may look good on paper, but not at the dinner table. Labor is enraged at the social cost of austerity and has embarked on a round of strikes and slowdowns.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | United Press International
Offices of the ruling Radical Civic Union Party were bombed in six cities Wednesday in apparent protest against an amnesty law exempting nearly 200 military and police officers from human rights trials, authorities said. There were no injuries reported in the blasts.
NEWS
November 5, 1985
Argentine President Raul Alfonsin hailed the victory of his Radical Civic Union party in parliamentary elections as "a great day" for democracy. The party increased its slim majority by one seat, giving it 130 seats in the 254-member lower house of Congress, according to nearly complete returns from Sunday's elections. The opposition Peronist party lost seven seats, leaving it with 104 seats. The remaining 20 seats were split by small parties.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin was distressed and discouraged after his party took a beating in Argentina's congressional and provincial elections in September. Officials denied rumors that he was thinking of resigning, but it was clear that the president's spirits were low. Now, political analysts say, Alfonsin's darkest moment has passed, and he is facing the formidable problems of his administration with renewed buoyancy.
NEWS
September 8, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin of Argentina faced the discouraging prospect Monday of diminished legislative support for his ambitious government programs after losing a lower-house majority in congressional elections. While weakening Alfonsin's four-year-old administration, the Sunday elections gave new strength to the labor-based Justicialist (Peronist) Party, Argentina's second political force.
NEWS
January 22, 1986 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Striking with the sudden ferocity of a summer squall, social unrest is buffeting the reformist government of President Raul Alfonsin. International applause for Alfonsin's effort to rein in inflation is being drowned out by domestic protest from left and right. Alfonsin's economics may look good on paper, but not at the dinner table. Labor is enraged at the social cost of austerity and has embarked on a round of strikes and slowdowns.
NEWS
February 19, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
With its attempts to control Argentina's galloping inflation an apparent failure, President Raul Alfonsin's economics team resigned en masse Monday night in a move that caught the nation by surprise. A presidential spokesman said Alfonsin has accepted the resignations of Economics Minister Bernardo Grinspun and Central Bank President Enrique Garcia Vazquez.
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