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NEWS
February 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Five radical students armed with bombs and knives seized a U.S. Information Service office today, detonated two bombs and started a fire before police overpowered them. Two of the students brandishing explosive devices and draped in South Korean flags stood at shattered windows on the second floor yelling "Yankee, go home!" as riot police ringed the building. U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2009 | Cathleen Decker
The campus protests of the 1960s happened long enough ago that the images filter through in black-and-white, the tint of television newsreels and newspaper photographs back in the day: Mario Savio, ushering in the Free Speech Movement from atop a police car and exhorting fellow Berkeley students to block the arrest of their friend in the car below. The months-long student strike at San Francisco State, marked by the college president yanking out speaker wires to disrupt a rally.
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NEWS
May 20, 1991 | From Reuters
More than 40,000 South Korean students and workers crowded into a plaza in Kwangju late Sunday for disorderly, often violent, final rites for a student whose killing by police sparked weeks of protests. The burial of Kang Kyung Dae, 20, ended nearly 24 hours of clashes with police and a standoff between his parents and radical students determined to use the body as a focus for their demonstrations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1997 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The collective buzz on L.A.'s talk-radio waves has been a resounding boo for the Board of Education, branding its members a bunch of "politically correct" wimps for their decision last week to scrap hallowed school Indian nicknames. But to one group of University High School graduates, the demise of their alma mater's "Warrior" tradition was a stroke of delicious justice, even if it came 25 years too late. They were the publishers of the Red Tide, a radical left-wing student newspaper that emerged on the Westside campus in the wake of the tumultuous 1960s.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Thousands of students hurled rocks and firebombs in a clash with riot police today to mark the eighth anniversary of a bloody civil uprising in the southern city of Kwangju. The current wave of protests, which began Monday, continued to spread as dissidents and radical students prepared to mark the protests on May 18, 1980, in which 200 people died in the city of Kwangju, 165 miles south of Seoul.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | From Times wire services
Radical students carrying sledgehammers attacked and damaged a U.S. cultural center today in Kwangju, hurling firebombs and rocks and attempting to burn down the building. Police in the southern provincial city said about 50 students rushed into the compound yelling "Drive out Yankee imperialists!" and threw stones and about 50 firebombs. They said about 15 protesters climbed onto the roof and tried to start a fire. A U.S.
NEWS
June 25, 1989
South Korean riot troops backed by fire trucks raided a university campus before dawn and arrested 21 students accused of organizing violent anti-government protests. About 3,500 police searched two buildings at Hanyang University in eastern Seoul for student leaders, police said. Meanwhile, in the southern provincial capital of Kwangju, news reports said about 400 radical students armed with firebombs and steel bars attacked prosecutors' offices, burning two cars and injuring five police officers.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prosecutors in Seoul indicted six radical students in connection with an attack on the U.S. ambassador's residence last month and ordered a nationwide manhunt for four other suspects. Government prosecutors said criminal charges were filed against Jung Chung Rae, a senior at Seoul's Konkuk University, and five others as a result of the Oct. 13 attack on the residence of U.S. Ambassador Donald Gregg in Seoul.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1997 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The collective buzz on L.A.'s talk-radio waves has been a resounding boo for the Board of Education, branding its members a bunch of "politically correct" wimps for their decision last week to scrap hallowed school Indian nicknames. But to one group of University High School graduates, the demise of their alma mater's "Warrior" tradition was a stroke of delicious justice, even if it came 25 years too late.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | From Reuters
More than 40,000 South Korean students and workers crowded into a plaza in Kwangju late Sunday for disorderly, often violent, final rites for a student whose killing by police sparked weeks of protests. The burial of Kang Kyung Dae, 20, ended nearly 24 hours of clashes with police and a standoff between his parents and radical students determined to use the body as a focus for their demonstrations.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Two students from Myanmar carrying a fake bomb made out of soap hijacked a Thai jetliner to Calcutta on Saturday to dramatize demands for an end to military rule in their country. All of the 219 other passengers and crew aboard the plane were released gradually over a six-hour period before the hijackers gave themselves up to Indian police. The passengers reportedly included 32 Americans. No one was hurt, police said.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
More than 25,000 students shouting anti-government and anti-U.S. slogans barricaded the entrances to a university campus Saturday, and a student injured trying to reach the protest later died. As news of the student's death spread, thousands of riot police outside the campus of Chonnam University withdrew, apparently to avoid provoking protesters.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of radical students burned effigies of U.S. Ambassador Donald Gregg and President Roh Tae Woo on Monday in the southern city of Kwangju to protest the envoy's visit, news reports said. A separate group of 100 protesters threw human excrement and tear gas powder at a police station near the U.S. Cultural Center residence that Gregg visited, the reports said. Gregg, who apparently did not see the protests, was the first U.S.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prosecutors in Seoul indicted six radical students in connection with an attack on the U.S. ambassador's residence last month and ordered a nationwide manhunt for four other suspects. Government prosecutors said criminal charges were filed against Jung Chung Rae, a senior at Seoul's Konkuk University, and five others as a result of the Oct. 13 attack on the residence of U.S. Ambassador Donald Gregg in Seoul.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Radical students burned U.S. flags and clashed with riot police in Seoul and Kwangju on Monday as they began a week of protests to demand the expulsion of U.S. troops from South Korea. Students organized demonstrations on at least 23 campuses nationwide. Most were peaceful and small in scale, with just a few hundred students taking part, police said. But in the southern city of Kwangju, about 170 miles southwest of Seoul, an estimated 1,000 students hurled rocks and sticks at riot police in a violent demonstration, officials said.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of radical students burned effigies of U.S. Ambassador Donald Gregg and President Roh Tae Woo on Monday in the southern city of Kwangju to protest the envoy's visit, news reports said. A separate group of 100 protesters threw human excrement and tear gas powder at a police station near the U.S. Cultural Center residence that Gregg visited, the reports said. Gregg, who apparently did not see the protests, was the first U.S.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Radical students protesting a South Korean government ban on travel to North Korea clashed violently with police Saturday, and President Roh Tae Woo ordered a crackdown on student leaders. At Seoul's Hanyang University, the 24-hour siege of a classroom building ended after hundreds of students wielding metal pipes and clubs fled down a hillside through a police blockade. Some were arrested and others surrendered.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
South Korean riot police and radical students battled with tear gas, steel bars and rocks Thursday as students demanded that the government lift a ban barring them from a youth festival in North Korea. President Roh Tae Woo said that leftists threaten democracy in South Korea, and Unification Minister Lee Hong Koo said the government may postpone planned talks with Pyongyang's Communist government. About 1,500 students fought riot troops around Seoul's Hanyang University after 3,000 police sealed off the campus to stop other college students from joining the protest.
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