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NEWS
July 4, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Natalia Dorokhina is a card-carrying member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. In a soft but steady voice, she speaks of Lenin as a "criminal" and says he was no lofty-minded revolutionary but the mastermind of a violent putsch that destroyed a legal government.
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NEWS
May 28, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Roh Tae Woo said today that he will guarantee the right of peaceful assembly but will deal sternly with violence and stand firm against radicals seeking to overthrow his government.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A powerful group of radicals launched a drive Saturday to make Boris N. Yeltsin the first popularly elected president in Russian history, naming him as their candidate in an election scheduled June 12. Winning the election would give Yeltsin the kind of enhanced executive power in the huge Russian Federation that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev now wields nationwide.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Red Square gunman who fired two shots across from Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was identified Saturday as a radical activist who had hawked subversive leaflets and belonged to a new party pledged to remove the Communists from power. Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, chief of the KGB security agency, had indicated last week that officials believed Alexander A. Shmonov, 38, of Leningrad, who fired a sawed-off shotgun during the annual Revolution Day parade Wednesday, was simply insane.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party's top leadership sharply criticized radical reformers within the party Tuesday, accusing them of dividing it into factions and undermining its authority, and it called for their ouster in what some of them fear could become a purge of liberals.
NEWS
September 30, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many of his contemporaries, 87-year-old Jack Miller likes to relax in a rocking chair in his living room. Unlike most of them, though, he keeps a brightly hued poster of Che Guevara on the wall behind him. During nearly every weekend of the Reagan years Miller and other somewhat less august citizens maintained a vigil at Laguna's Main Beach, protesting U.S. intervention in Central America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2000 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Jacques Medina did not flee Mexico in search of work or opportunity. He left because he knew what might happen if he stayed. In 1973, he was a 28-year-old attorney, a leader of the Mexican student movement fighting for democracy and workers' rights. That year, he was arrested and accused of attempting to kidnap the dean of the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mexico City. Jacques Medina faced a harsh choice: If he stayed, he could be killed or imprisoned.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
Over bitter protests from law officers, 1960s radical Kathy Boudin was released from prison Wednesday after serving 22 years for taking part in an armored car heist that left two police officers and a security guard dead. "I'm physically ill right now," said Brent Newbury, president of the Rockland County Patrolmen's Benevolent Assn. "I can't believe I just saw Kathy Boudin walk out of prison."
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, he hurled a few rocks and slugged the occasional police officer and may have taken part in urban guerrilla drills. But that was the Joschka Fischer of yesteryear, the scruffy radical of the raucous 1960s and '70s, not the svelte and suave foreign minister whom Germans know and love today.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | ALEX ABELLA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I was standing at an LAX arrival gate, holding up a sign with a name, just like the dozen or so limousine drivers, waiting for my party to arrive. Out trooped Fran Drescher and other celebrities from the first-class section, some of whom I vaguely recognized from the pages of magazines. But the sign I was holding read "Juan Gonzalez," whose renown was first earned at a time when practically the only other Latino name in the news was Richard Nixon's friend and confidant, Bebe Rebozo.
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