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Radicchio

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NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
It used to be that radicchio was one of those oddball vegetables that you could find in the grocery store but not very often at farmers markets. That's because early on everyone except for a couple of big farmers had a difficult time growing it. Now, with a better choice of seeds and better knowledge of growing practices, radicchio is becoming more available. There are many varieties of radicchio. Most of what we see at farmers markets is Treviso, which comes in a red, round head. It is mildly bitter and makes a good salad ingredient.
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NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
It used to be that radicchio was one of those oddball vegetables that you could find in the grocery store but not very often at farmers markets. That's because early on everyone except for a couple of big farmers had a difficult time growing it. Now, with a better choice of seeds and better knowledge of growing practices, radicchio is becoming more available. There are many varieties of radicchio. Most of what we see at farmers markets is Treviso, which comes in a red, round head. It is mildly bitter and makes a good salad ingredient.
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FOOD
October 1, 2008
Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Moroccan olives are available at Whole Foods and specialty markets. To make creamy horseradish, combine one-half cup sour cream with 1 tablespoon straight horseradish and season with one-eighth teaspoon salt. Radicchio slaw 1 head radicchio, cored and quartered lengthwise 1/2 head red cabbage, cored and halved lengthwise 1/2 cup capers 1/2 cup chopped Moroccan olives 1 tablespoon minced thyme 1 1/4 teaspoons minced rosemary 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar 3 tablespoons olive oil Salt Freshly ground black pepper Sugar 1. Finely shred the radicchio and cabbage crosswise and toss in a large bowl.
FOOD
October 1, 2008
Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Moroccan olives are available at Whole Foods and specialty markets. To make creamy horseradish, combine one-half cup sour cream with 1 tablespoon straight horseradish and season with one-eighth teaspoon salt. Radicchio slaw 1 head radicchio, cored and quartered lengthwise 1/2 head red cabbage, cored and halved lengthwise 1/2 cup capers 1/2 cup chopped Moroccan olives 1 tablespoon minced thyme 1 1/4 teaspoons minced rosemary 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar 3 tablespoons olive oil Salt Freshly ground black pepper Sugar 1. Finely shred the radicchio and cabbage crosswise and toss in a large bowl.
MAGAZINE
July 1, 1990
Brentwood Bar and Grille on San Vicente Boulevard is a knockout. Try their grilled chicken breasts with linguini and radicchio for lunch and their lamb chops for dinner. When we don't want to splurge, we go to Bob Burns Restaurant in Santa Monica. Try sharing their bouillabaisse for dinner, or else order their swordfish and start with the Caesar salad. ALAN J. PHILLIPS Santa Monica
FOOD
December 20, 1987 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: So many of the holiday recipes call for some type of alcohol. What can those of us who keep none in the house substitute? Answer: White or purple grape juice is a good alternative. Fruit juices that complement the other flavors in the recipe may also be used. Q: I was given several pounds of white rice flour. I don't know how to use it. Could I substitute it in part for white wheat flour?
FOOD
July 16, 2008
Grilled fig salad Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 4 Note: From test kitchen manager Noelle Carter 1/3 cup walnut halves Salt Best-quality olive oil 2 tablespoons minced shallots 1/2 teaspoon chopped thyme 1/4 teaspoon chopped rosemary 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar 6 tablespoons best-quality olive oil Freshly ground black pepper 8 ripe figs 1 head radicchio 1 large head fennel...
FOOD
December 17, 1989 | BARBARA HANSEN
Ellmer is a chef-instructor at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, and he writes in a straightforward manner that makes the recipes easy to follow. Don't be put off by the designation "for professionals" in the title. This book will appeal to anyone with a serious interest in Italian cuisine. The current generation of pasta lovers will find a long chapter devoted to that item in its many shapes, but pizza lovers will have to look for another book. The dough-based snack is not covered in this one. What you get instead are formulas for such wonderful sounding dishes as stuffed veal tenderloin wrapped in savoy cabbage with garlic and green peppercorn sauce, spring lamb chops stuffed with porcini and sun-dried tomatoes, beef roulades braised in Barolo and deviled grilled chicken with grilled scallions and radicchio.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | CHARLES PERRY
C'est Fan-Fan is a Franco-Chinese miniature, a miniature version of Chinois on Main, to be exact. Strip Chinois down to the counter seating with the view of the chefs, and then pare down the staff to one chef and a waiter/assistant, and you have C'est Fan-Fan. There's no decor but a flower arrangement and some calligraphic Oriental paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1986 | ROBIN GREEN
Cafe Katsu is a chic little restaurant in a new pod mall on Sawtelle Boulevard. While the other shops house the more prosaic dry cleaners, jewelry shops and pizza joints peculiar to these instant shopping centers, Cafe Katsu (an offshoot of the stunning, minimalist Katsu, a sushi bar on Hillhurst Avenue) is in a different class and, like its mother restaurant, as spare as a La Cienega gallery. The walls are white; the floor, cement; the table tops, granite; the chairs, Breuer.
FOOD
July 16, 2008
Grilled fig salad Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 4 Note: From test kitchen manager Noelle Carter 1/3 cup walnut halves Salt Best-quality olive oil 2 tablespoons minced shallots 1/2 teaspoon chopped thyme 1/4 teaspoon chopped rosemary 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar 6 tablespoons best-quality olive oil Freshly ground black pepper 8 ripe figs 1 head radicchio 1 large head fennel...
FOOD
February 6, 2008 | Betty Hallock and Donna Deane, Times Staff Writers
CHOPPED salad is the quintessential Los Angeles salad. After all, it's akin to the Cobb salad, which rose to stardom during the heyday of Hollywood's Brown Derby. And who hasn't been tempted to order one in any of a dozen Italian restaurants that have it on the menu as a cornerstone? But let's face it -- for years, the chopped salad has been resting on its laurels -- or its iceberg lettuce, anyway. Fortunately, it's undergone a renaissance lately.
FOOD
February 6, 2008
Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 Note: From Donna Deane 1 teaspoon minced anchovies, from about 2 fillets 1 clove garlic, minced 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon chopped capers 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided Freshly ground black pepper Salt 2 heads Treviso radicchio, quartered lengthwise 1 small head romaine, quartered lengthwise 1/4 cup diced red onion...
REAL ESTATE
June 17, 2007 | Linda Baker, Special to The Times
The residential skyscrapers in downtown Vancouver, Canada, are already covered with green. Rooftops and balconies overflow with ornamental vines, shrubs, even midsize magnolia and maple trees. And now, there's more. Vancouver is launching a novel green initiative aimed at bringing food-producing gardens to the city's high-density developments.
FOOD
November 29, 2006 | Beth Fortune, Special to The Times
LOOK at the wildly tangled leaves of curly endive, the furiously jagged edges of dandelion greens, the deep furls of escarole and right off you know there's something about them that's just begging to be tamed. It's a bit of a paradox. These greens are loved for their bitter bite, but harnessing that bite -- say, by adding the spice of chiles or the sweetness of bacon or by giving them a quick blanch or even just a saute -- is what makes them sing. And at this time of year, bitter greens are calling from nearly every other stall or stand at the farmers market or the grocery store; they're a boon of winter.
FOOD
November 2, 2005 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
"YOU know your kitchen is small when you're making salad on the stove," Suzanne Goin says as she pulls a cutting board over to her range and meticulously begins to slice radicchio leaves into long, feathery strips. It's here in her home in the Hollywood Hills that Goin worked on the recipes for her new cookbook, "Sunday Suppers at Lucques."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1992 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of my stage-struck lawyer friends is forever dreaming of an evening at Spago, on the off chance that she will rub elbows with the likes of Warren Beatty or Jack Nicholson. But when I invite her to Shane Hidden on the Glen, a pint-size strip-mall Spago at the top of Beverly Glen, she hesitates. She isn't after the delicious pizzas, salads and grilled meats you can eat in a place like this; she's after, well, a cheap thrill. So tonight, I promise her a celebrity. She agrees to meet me at 7.
FOOD
August 13, 1987 | Bert Greene's Kitchen
Like fluctuating hemlines, certain dishes rise up and then almost immediately fall out of fashion with alarming predictability. And, something fresh on the food scene today is almost certain to appear stale tomorrow. Particularly if a much-touted food (like croissants, chocolate truffles or goat cheese) has already begun to filter into Middle America's culinary consciousness.
FOOD
February 12, 2003 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
DO you remember the first time you saw the word "radicchio"? The first time you tried to say it out loud? Now, how about the first time you cooked it? We didn't think so. Radicchio may have gone from an obscure Italian vegetable to a supermarket familiarity, but for most people it remains nothing more than a splashy colored lettuce, a bit of crimson to break up the monotony of a pale green salad mix. In Italy, particularly around Venice, it is cooked almost as often as it is served raw.
MAGAZINE
March 14, 1999 | NANCY SPILLER, Nancy Spiller last wrote about apples for the magazine
For hundreds of years, people have waxed poetic about the light in Venice. I was sure it would floor me on my first trip there last fall. But it rained and was overcast my entire stay, leaving me eager for some other equally moving visual experience. Hidden behind clouds, the full moon provided no magic, though it did bring the acqua alta, or high water, to flood the streets and keep me from the Byzantine mosaics of St. Mark's Basilica. Don't even ask about the gondola ride.
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