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BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
A proposed radio merger that the Justice Department had challenged was abandoned Tuesday, and the government is requiring the sell-off of 18 radio stations as a condition of approving two other billion-dollar mergers in the rapidly consolidating industry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Conservative KABC talk-show host Larry Elder is taking his controversial show national. Elder signed a deal this week with Synergy Broadcasting--the Newport Beach-based syndicator behind the top-rated Dr. Laura Schlessinger show--in a move he hopes will bring him a national audience, though Los Angeles' KABC-AM (790) will remain his flagship station.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
For the first time since a 1996 law set off more than 1,000 mergers among radio stations, the Justice Department sued on Thursday to block one of the deals: Chancellor Media Corp.'s $54-million acquisition of four New York stations. In a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in New York, the department alleged that Chancellor's deal with SFX Broadcasting Inc.
NEWS
August 9, 1997 | KASPER ZEUTHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move expected to spark an avalanche of commercials for prescription drugs, the Food and Drug Administration on Friday announced a policy giving pharmaceutical companies more leeway to promote their products on television and radio. The revised FDA restrictions mean companies may spell out their product's explicit purpose on commercials without including a long list of side effects and potential problems associated with the drug.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After many delays and missteps, the Wilson administration on Thursday launched a major new anti-smoking advertising blitz, featuring an especially strong television spot showing a woman who has throat cancer but is so addicted to nicotine that she continues to smoke through a hole in her throat. The ads are the first by the state in more than two years and represent the opening $22-million phase of a three-year $67.5-million campaign.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1996
Premiere Radio Networks Inc., a Sherman Oaks supplier of radio programming, said it completed its $4-million investment and "strategic alliance" with AudioNet. Founded about a year ago, Dallas-based AudioNet broadcasts audio content on the Internet and World Wide Web. The deal calls for Premiere to act as AudioNet's exclusive sales representative for network radio advertising.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER
Radio broadcasters have long been the pipsqueaks of advertising because of the narrow niche audiences that individual stations offer to the McDonald'ses and Jiffy Lubes of the world. But flush with new powers to amass groups of stations, radio owners are now threatening to cut into newspapers' dominance in local advertising. "With one station in a market, you can't get Pizza Hut's interest," said Norman Feuer, president and chief executive of Triathlon Broadcasting Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1995 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sundays will be (silver and) Black Sabbath this fall on Los Angeles classic-rock radio station KLSX-FM (97.1), which signed on last month as the flagship for the Raiders' radio network. Pro football and classic rock might seem an odd coupling--the staid NFL has been called the No Fun League--but KLSX is among a growing number of FM stations across the country that have aligned themselves with NFL teams.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California law designed to take the hype out of attorney advertising went into effect this month, and personal injury lawyer Larry H. Parker sure isn't enjoying it. Gone are Parker's ads showing a healthy-looking man in a Hawaiian shirt sipping a cool drink and proclaiming, "Larry Parker won me $2.1 million, and I'm sure enjoying it." To comply with the law, the Long Beach attorney has been forced to scrap the trademark TV commercials so familiar to daytime viewers.
NEWS
November 4, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Political seasons are rarely pretty. Yet California's 1994 election campaign does appear to be breaking new grime, oozing mud across the airwaves in ways that soil not only candidates but the entire process itself. In a discussion of campaign tactics on CNN recently, media researcher Robert Lichter said that every study he'd seen showed that "there are more positive ads than negative ads." On the planet Pluto, perhaps.
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