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Radio Advertising

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2000
The battle to win over Ventura County voters began Monday when radio advertisements sponsored by Community Memorial Hospital began airing on stations throughout the region. The radio spots are meant to persuade voters that Community Memorial and seven private hospitals would make better use of $260 million in tobacco settlement money than the county.
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BUSINESS
June 2, 2000 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One month into the strike by actors against the advertising industry, the shooting of commercials is off sharply in Los Angeles as the stalemate between the two sides continues. Union representatives for the actors say it's because they have been successful at making a substantial dent in commercial productions with their strike. But the ad industry says that it only means more shooting is taking place outside Los Angeles to avoid picketers.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2000 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war between the advertising industry and striking actors escalated Tuesday, with ad agencies filing federal unfair labor practice complaints against the actors' union for allegedly threatening to permanently ban from the union any actors who appear in commercials during the strike. The Screen Actors Guild immediately fired back, with its chief negotiator John McGuire calling the allegations "groundless and without merit."
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The actors who pitch everything from soap to soft drinks on television and radio, often seen as the less glamorous members of the entertainment industry, went on strike Monday against the advertising industry. The strike by members of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, the first work stoppage in Hollywood in 12 years, is not expected to be settled easily or quickly. It may signal further Hollywood labor unrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
Opponents of the Ahmanson Ranch development have stepped up their campaign against one of the largest developments in county history by launching a series of radio attack ads against Washington Mutual Bank, parent company of the land developer.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2000 | DARYL STRICKLAND, Daryl Strickland covers real estate for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5670, and at: daryl.strickland@latimes.com
AMC Realty Network, a discount real estate brokerage launched earlier this year in Newport Beach, believes it may have found a medium for its message after all. The company said it has bought a series of ads that will be aired on KNX radio (1070). AMC, which collects a $2,500 fee--lower than full-service brokers--to represent buyers when negotiating the price of a new home, has had trouble finding publications willing to accept its ads.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1999 | SHARON WALSH, WASHINGTON POST
In Manhattan, you can't walk down the street without seeing a "dot-com" ad on the side of a building or a bus. In San Francisco, radio stations play one dot-com jingle after another. And televised football games now have more ads for Internet sites than for beer.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After initially dismissing its involvement in a radio promotion called "The Black Hoe," Walt Disney Co. is now moving aggressively to rein in the mounting controversy. Six weeks ago, Disney balked at demands from civil rights groups to issue an apology for airing a promotion on KLOS-FM's "Mark & Brian Show" during which "Black Hoes"--black, plastic gardening tools--were distributed to listeners and advertisers last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is spending $145,000 on radio ads to promote the Freeway Service Patrol, just months after cutting back the popular emergency tow-truck service. The ads advise motorists that if their cars break down, they can get help for free. But the spots fail to mention that help is largely limited to the morning and evening rush hour because the transit authority last July eliminated the rescue service between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. except in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court agreed Friday to judge the validity of a federal law the Clinton administration says is needed to protect compulsive gamblers from the lure of casinos -and games of chance. The justices said they will decide whether free-speech rights are violated by the government's ban on television and radio ads that promote casinos not owned by Indian tribes.
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