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BUSINESS
October 19, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After initially dismissing its involvement in a radio promotion called "The Black Hoe," Walt Disney Co. is now moving aggressively to rein in the mounting controversy. Six weeks ago, Disney balked at demands from civil rights groups to issue an apology for airing a promotion on KLOS-FM's "Mark & Brian Show" during which "Black Hoes"--black, plastic gardening tools--were distributed to listeners and advertisers last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is spending $145,000 on radio ads to promote the Freeway Service Patrol, just months after cutting back the popular emergency tow-truck service. The ads advise motorists that if their cars break down, they can get help for free. But the spots fail to mention that help is largely limited to the morning and evening rush hour because the transit authority last July eliminated the rescue service between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. except in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court agreed Friday to judge the validity of a federal law the Clinton administration says is needed to protect compulsive gamblers from the lure of casinos -and games of chance. The justices said they will decide whether free-speech rights are violated by the government's ban on television and radio ads that promote casinos not owned by Indian tribes.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1998 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not unusual for zealous owners of General Motors' electric cars to pitch the auto maker on ways to promote its EV1. One actress developed a script that likened the car's rounded contours to a woman's body. A Hollywood production company owner offered several plot lines and free use of his company's equipment. But Marvin Rush has gone where no EV1 enthusiast has gone before.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saying Seagram's controversial foray into television advertising has been a nonevent in the 51 U.S. markets where stations have accepted its liquor ads, President Edgar Bronfman Jr. vowed Wednesday that the company will continue its push into TV and radio advertising. "I am confident we will soon see Seagram's products widely advertised on radio and television," Bronfman said in a speech to the Advertising Club of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1998 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't be surprised if you hear a disc jockey introduce a record by advising motorists to pull over to the side of the road and pay attention--because they're about to hear a classic. In fact, thousands of radio listeners will hear exactly that in coming weeks under a controversial new advertising campaign in which Capitol Nashville Records is paying CBS-owned radio stations to air 10-second spots before or after selected records are played.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
A proposed radio merger that the Justice Department had challenged was abandoned Tuesday, and the government is requiring the sell-off of 18 radio stations as a condition of approving two other billion-dollar mergers in the rapidly consolidating industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Conservative KABC talk-show host Larry Elder is taking his controversial show national. Elder signed a deal this week with Synergy Broadcasting--the Newport Beach-based syndicator behind the top-rated Dr. Laura Schlessinger show--in a move he hopes will bring him a national audience, though Los Angeles' KABC-AM (790) will remain his flagship station.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
For the first time since a 1996 law set off more than 1,000 mergers among radio stations, the Justice Department sued on Thursday to block one of the deals: Chancellor Media Corp.'s $54-million acquisition of four New York stations. In a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in New York, the department alleged that Chancellor's deal with SFX Broadcasting Inc.
NEWS
August 9, 1997 | KASPER ZEUTHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move expected to spark an avalanche of commercials for prescription drugs, the Food and Drug Administration on Friday announced a policy giving pharmaceutical companies more leeway to promote their products on television and radio. The revised FDA restrictions mean companies may spell out their product's explicit purpose on commercials without including a long list of side effects and potential problems associated with the drug.
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