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Radio Announcers

ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2005 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
Ira Glass was talking a blue streak, sipping takeout soup with a plastic spoon, bent over himself in a chair on a dog day afternoon in a Manhattan editing studio, explaining how fans of his Chicago-based public radio program, "This American Life," react when they find out he's attempting to cross over to television. "They go, 'Ohhh ...' -- like, 'Please, don't,' " he said in the unradiolike voice that is his trademark.
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SPORTS
December 24, 2004 | From Associated Press
As the Pittsburgh Steelers troop into a hotel lobby the night before a game, scores of black- and gold-wearing fans huddle anxiously, waiting for their favorite star. Player upon player goes by, yet he still hasn't shown up, and the crowd is growing nervous. Finally, amid a sea of mountainous men who tower over him by at least six inches, a septuagenarian man appears to a frenzied response: "Myron! Over here! Sign my Terrible Towel! Myron, give me a hug!"
WORLD
May 22, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
The abrupt resignations of three popular radio talk-show hosts in recent weeks amid accusations of political intimidation have alarmed human rights activists, who view the incidents as part of a broader mood of intolerance in this former British colony.
WORLD
May 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Two outspoken Hong Kong radio talk-show hosts critical of the territory's pro-Beijing leaders have gone off the air within 10 days of each other, raising fears that freedom of speech is at risk. On Raymond Wong's radio program, a guest host read a statement that said Wong was "physically and mentally tired." It did not say when he would return to the air. Albert Cheng left his phone-in radio show last week.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2003 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
Conservative talk-radio king Rush Limbaugh returned to America's airwaves Friday, shedding no light on the drug investigation involving him in Florida but asking his millions of proverbially loyal listeners to keep their faith in him. "I don't want to respond to what's in the press," Limbaugh said on his nationally syndicated radio show. "I'm not going to even characterize it yet. Just trust me on this.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2003 | From Associated Press
The co-host of a radio sports show was suspended Thursday for two days without pay for on-air comments comparing a zoo's escaped gorilla to inner-city students who use a voluntary busing program known as Metco. John Dennis of WEEI-AM apologized to listeners Wednesday for the remark he made two days earlier after seeing a newspaper photograph of the gorilla standing by a bus stop. He said the animal was "probably a Metco gorilla waiting for a bus."
WORLD
September 26, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A high-profile national broadcaster, under fire for using racist epithets to describe U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, was forced off the air by a bomb threat. Police evacuated the Auckland radio studio of NewstalkZB 15 minutes before Paul Holmes' breakfast news and talk show was to end. Holmes apologized after his Wednesday comments and insisted he was not a racist. "I should not have said what I did. It was tongue-in-cheek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2003 | From Associated Press
Ken Coleman, the broadcaster whose resonant voice carried Boston Red Sox fans through some of their greatest victories and biggest disappointments, died Thursday. He was 78. Coleman died at Jordan Hospital in Plymouth, Mass., where he had been treated for complications from bacterial meningitis, according to his son, William Coleman.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 2003 | NELSON HANDEL
Johnny Wendell is stretching his wings on an unlikely perch for a passionate liberal Democrat: KFI-AM (640), home to conservative talk radio giants such as Rush Limbaugh and Dr. Laura Schlessinger. The weekend slot occupied by Wendell, whose job history includes stints as a punk rocker, actor and journalist for publications such as the LA Weekly, is a plankton of liberalism in the sea of conservative radio commentators nationwide.
SPORTS
June 12, 2003 | Larry Stewart
As expected, the Lakers announced Wednesday that their new radio announcing team will be Joel Meyers and Mychal Thompson. A radio industry source said both signed three-year contracts. Meyers has been the television play-by-play voice of the San Antonio Spurs the last four seasons. He is currently with the Spurs doing a cable post-game show during the NBA Finals. Meyers and his family live in the San Fernando Valley.
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