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BUSINESS
September 12, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood actors will seek higher minimum pay rates and larger contributions to their health and pension plans in contract negotiations with the industry's major TV and movie studios, set to begin this month. Those are the highlights from a package of bargaining proposals approved Sunday by the joint board of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, according to sources familiar with the talks. The proposals, culled from weeks of meetings with members of both unions nationwide, will form the framework for contract negotiations with the major studios that are scheduled to start Sept.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The union representing Hollywood's actors hailed a landmark international treaty that officials said would provide important "economical and moral rights" for actors and other performers around the world. SAG-AFTRA, which has more than 160,000 members, said actors would benefit from a treaty signed by 46 countries Tuesday at a conference in Beijing held by the World Intellectual Property Organization, a United Nations agency in Geneva. If ratified, the treaty would require member countries to set up systems guaranteeing that actors and other performers would be compensated for the reuse of their work.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000
Re "SAG's Stalemate With Ad Industry Costs L.A. Plenty," June 16: Thanks for your update on the Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Television and Radio Artists strike against commercial producers. Actors are not seeking a wholesale restructuring of the way commercials are paid. We are simply asking commercial producers not to dismantle the current system. They propose to replace pay-per-play for national commercials with a flat fee, creating an earnings cap for actors while allowing advertisers unlimited usage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The newly formed SAG-AFTRA board of directors has confirmed David White as the merged union's sole national executive director. The national board of SAG-AFTRA voted overwhelmingly Sunday to select White for the job, approving a new three-year contract. White, the former Screen Actors Guild executive director, was expected to assume the new position as the chief administrative officer for the union of about 160,000 members. He had been serving as co-national executive director with former American Federation of Television and Radio Artists leader Kim Roberts Hedgpeth, who announced last month that she was resigning.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The newly formed SAG-AFTRA board of directors has confirmed David White as the merged union's sole national executive director. The national board of SAG-AFTRA voted overwhelmingly Sunday to select White for the job, approving a new three-year contract. White, the former Screen Actors Guild executive director, was expected to assume the new position as the chief administrative officer for the union of about 160,000 members. He had been serving as co-national executive director with former American Federation of Television and Radio Artists leader Kim Roberts Hedgpeth, who announced last month that she was resigning.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
New York members of the Screen Actors Guild national board issued a sharp rebuke of their own leaders Sunday, demanding that they seek help from a federal mediator if contract talks don't progress by Aug. 25. The unusual criticism was the latest sign of infighting between the Hollywood and New York factions on SAG's 71-member national board. The New York group, which holds 14 seats on the board, blasted SAG leaders for "failing to bargain realistically" with the studios. "Nothing is happening, and we're no closer to a deal today than we were six weeks ago," the New York members said in a statement, contradicting assertions by SAG Executive Director Doug Allen and President Alan Rosenberg that contract discussions with the studios were ongoing.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
A year after a failed merger attempt between the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, accusations are still flying over alleged voter manipulation. SAG said Monday that two sets of electronic communications were sent out on the eve of the bitterly contested election over the proposed merger, which backers said would give performers more clout when negotiating with media conglomerates. One of the e-mails was an anonymous mass mailing to SAG members.
OPINION
June 14, 2008
Negotiations over Hollywood's last unfinished labor agreement are coming down to the wire, with a little more than two weeks left before the studios' contract with the Screen Actors Guild expires. So it's a particularly bad time for the long-simmering feud between SAG and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists to boil over. Leaders of SAG have been bashing the tentative deal that AFTRA's negotiating team struck with the studios May 28. They sent an e-mail to members (about 44,000 of whom are also in AFTRA)
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The union representing Hollywood's actors hailed a landmark international treaty that officials said would provide important "economical and moral rights" for actors and other performers around the world. SAG-AFTRA, which has more than 160,000 members, said actors would benefit from a treaty signed by 46 countries Tuesday at a conference in Beijing held by the World Intellectual Property Organization, a United Nations agency in Geneva. If ratified, the treaty would require member countries to set up systems guaranteeing that actors and other performers would be compensated for the reuse of their work.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
A push by the Screen Actors Guild to defeat a recent accord negotiated by a rival union has touched off an internal rebellion. New York members of SAG's national board took the unusual step Thursday of openly criticizing their leaders over a decision to launch an "educational campaign" against a contract negotiated by the smaller American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. Citing what it says are shortcomings in the AFTRA accord, SAG's national executive committee last week narrowly approved a plan to persuade 44,000 joint card holders to vote down the agreement.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
After a marathon meeting, Hollywood's two main actors unions took a historic step toward creating the largest and potentially most powerful entertainment union in the industry. Leaders of the 125,000-member Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, which has about 70,000 members, reached a merger agreement Monday after nine days of intensive talks at the Renaissance Hollywood Hotel. If approved as expected by the union boards and memberships, the merger would end a decades-long competition between the two groups to organize actors.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Screen Actors Guild President Ken Howard was overwhelmingly reelected to a second term as president of the 125,000-member union. Howard, who did not face serious opposition, won 75% of the votes, defeating three lesser-known candidates in the presidential contest: David Hillberg, Sharon Rubin and Asmar Muhammad. His victory is likely to add further momentum toward merging SAG with its smaller sister union, the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists. Howard and his supporters have campaigned heavily on combining the unions to give actors more clout in negotiations and end long-standing conflicts between the two groups.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2010 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood actors will seek higher minimum pay rates and larger contributions to their health and pension plans in contract negotiations with the industry's major TV and movie studios, set to begin this month. Those are the highlights from a package of bargaining proposals approved Sunday by the joint board of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, according to sources familiar with the talks. The proposals, culled from weeks of meetings with members of both unions nationwide, will form the framework for contract negotiations with the major studios that are scheduled to start Sept.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2009 | Richard Verrier
Ken Howard scored his second big win this week. Screen Actors Guild members elected the veteran character actor, who on Sunday won an Emmy for his role in HBO's "Grey Gardens," as the group's new president, capping a bitter election campaign that divided Hollywood's largest union. Howard soundly defeated "In the Heat of the Night" actress Anne-Marie Johnson, SAG's first vice president, who was backed by the faction that swept outgoing president Alan Rosenberg into office four years ago. A coalition led by Howard consolidated its power on the national board, winning a majority of the 22 seats up for grabs on the 69-member board.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2009 | Richard Verrier
When members of the Screen Actors Guild cast their ballots for president in the coming weeks, they will be voting for a leader who can best repair the damage inflicted on Hollywood's largest talent union over the last two years. With 125,000 members, the 76-year-old SAG is still the mightiest union in Hollywood. But its clout has been diminished by internal bickering, a divided boardroom and a disastrous power struggle with a smaller union that represents actors as well as broadcast journalists, disc jockeys and recording artists.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2009 | Richard Verrier
After an all-night bargaining session, unions representing Hollywood's actors reached a tentative agreement with advertisers early Wednesday on a new contract covering work in commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1985 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
If the Writers Guild of America strike takes place as expected Tuesday and proves a lengthy one, it may pose a delicate situation for two Hollywood actors on a pair of ABC shows--Ed Asner and Frank Maxwell. Each is president of a major talent union. Asner, star of "Off the Rack," a new situation comedy scheduled to premiere March 15, is the outspoken president of the Screen Actors Guild. Maxwell, a regular on "General Hospital," heads the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
New York members of the Screen Actors Guild national board issued a sharp rebuke of their own leaders Sunday, demanding that they seek help from a federal mediator if contract talks don't progress by Aug. 25. The unusual criticism was the latest sign of infighting between the Hollywood and New York factions on SAG's 71-member national board. The New York group, which holds 14 seats on the board, blasted SAG leaders for "failing to bargain realistically" with the studios. "Nothing is happening, and we're no closer to a deal today than we were six weeks ago," the New York members said in a statement, contradicting assertions by SAG Executive Director Doug Allen and President Alan Rosenberg that contract discussions with the studios were ongoing.
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