Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRadio Audiences
IN THE NEWS

Radio Audiences

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2002 | Bob Baker, Times Staff Writer
I: Is he really saying that? You don't usually get congratulated on Tom Leykis' syndicated radio show unless you're, say, a caller describing the way you talked your unexpectedly pregnant girlfriend into having an abortion -- and then dumped her. Or unless you're a woman with a lascivious tale to share, like the law clerk who boasts about tripling her pay by engaging in masochistic sex with the partner of another firm.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
The controversial -- and nudity-filled -- video for Robin Thicke's " Blurred Lines " has attracted so much attention lately that one might assume it's behind the song's seven-week stint atop the Hot 100, an impressive reign that Billboard described this week as the longest so far in 2013. But "Blurred Lines" isn't just inescapable online -- it's also a fixture on the airwaves. According to a press release issued Friday by Thicke's label, Interscope Records, "Blurred Lines" has "broken the record for the highest radio audience ever recorded.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No. 2 is actually No. 1, and No. 1 is really No. 3. Move No. 3 to No. 4, take No. 4 off the Top 12, and bring up No. 5 to the No. 2 spot. Confused? Those are part of the maneuvers radio executives and advertisers go through every three months to determine the real meaning behind the Arbitron ratings.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2012 | James Rainey and Matea Gold
A new week greeted Rush Limbaugh with four more advertiser defections, for a total of 11, along with a sharp rebuke from former Republican presidential nominee John McCain. Peter Gabriel asked that his song "Sledgehammer" no longer be used on Limbaugh's radio program. Even after Limbaugh issued a rare apology, the furor that had erupted when the conservative radio host called an activist law student a "slut" and a "prostitute" showed no sign of abating Monday. But a backlash that might be a career-breaker for some commentators seemed unlikely to dent Limbaugh's considerable stature among his 15 million weekly listeners and conservative leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1996 | SANDY WELLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
KLAC-AM (570) exists in the pre-hip, pre-rock universe. And if hip is "dead," as some cultural pundits claim, then the road may be paved for the resurgence of square. KLAC may not embody square as far as its fans are concerned, but it is undeniably in a media world of its own. KLAC plays the "old" music, a format given the bland label of "Adult Standards" by an industry obsessed with crafting labels for every demographic bump, curl and contour as it applies to the money-spending population.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | BOB SECTER and TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writers
To grasp the depth of racial polarization in their town, all Chicagoans need do is tune in Monday night to an unusual radio program. Only hours before polls open in Tuesday's mayoral election, two competing radio stations--one with a predominantly white audience and the other heavily black--will simulcast a call-in show to unite their listeners for the first time over the airwaves.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
It's a tense moment in National Public Radio's Culver City studios as the staff of "Day to Day" attempts to work through the endless challenges of producing a major new show. NPR veteran J.J. Sutherland is guiding his crew through the details of completing one of the final dry runs for the first weekday news magazine NPR has launched since "Morning Edition" was created 24 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer. and
It's radio quiz time. Which of the following Southern California radio stations draws the most listeners? * News-heavy KNX-AM. * New-wave rocker KROQ-FM. * Spanish-language station KLVE-FM. If you guessed KNX or KROQ, you lose. In fact, another Spanish-language station, KWKW-AM (1330), is also more popular than either KNX (1070) or KROQ (106.7). In the most recent Arbitron ratings for the Los Angeles-Orange County areas, KLVE (107.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1993 | Dana Parsons
I have a series of confessions to make. For starters, I am a white male. I'm angry. I'm angry because women and minorities are taking over. I may even be boiling with a white-hot intensity. I'm resentful over losing my power to cope with societal changes. I'm suffering, too, from emotional disillusionment, but that may just be another manifestation of losing my power. I'm also a clod and, quite possibly, a boor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG
It was two days before 58-year-old classical music station KFAC was to die and FM-92 KKBT was to be born. The new general manager, Jim de Castro, had his sales staff assembled to watch a 10-second TV ad hyping the station's new incarnation, "Rock With a Beat." The ad featured a crowd staring down at a sleeping baby. One man in the crowd wore a Dodgers cap, another looked like a surfer, still another appeared to be a Latino immigrant. Suddenly there was a bang and the baby's eyes opened.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2009 | James Rainey
With jobs disappearing, bills piling up and the horizon appearing ever-narrower, the American middle class might be asking: Where is our voice? Where is our champion? Where is our . . . Roseanne? Actually, the original is raring to go. Roseanne Barr is angry. She's outspoken. And she would once again like to unleash her acid, comedic tongue on behalf of everyday Americans. "I think we should say something about class in America," Barr told me this week. "It's the dirty little secret nobody wants to talk about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Ed Reimers, the veteran television and commercial announcer with the deep, resonant voice who for more than two decades reassured viewers that "You're in good hands with Allstate," has died. He was 96. Reimers, an early on-air personality at KTTV-Channel 11 in Los Angeles in the 1950s, died Sunday of age-related causes at his daughter Kathryn R. Manning's home in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. For 22 years, beginning in 1957, Reimers was the TV spokesman for Allstate Insurance Co., memorably cupping his hands and delivering the company's famous slogan at the end of the commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2009 | Washington Post
At a time when newspapers, magazines and TV news continue to lose readers and viewers, at least one part of the traditional media has continued to grow robustly: National Public Radio. The audience for NPR's daily news programs, including "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered," reached a record last year, driven by widespread interest in the presidential election and the general decline of radio news elsewhere. Washington-based NPR released new figures Tuesday showing that the cumulative audience for its daily news programs hit 20.9 million a week, a 9% increase over the previous year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2004 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
Public radio has an incredibly educated community of listeners, some of whom know more about the subjects of certain stories than the reporters. The challenge is finding those listeners and tapping their knowledge. The solution, according to Minnesota Public Radio, is "public insight journalism," an interactive news-gathering model that systematically roots out new sources, fresh story angles and emerging trends through town hall meetings and Internet surveys.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Clear Channel Communications, the largest U.S. radio broadcaster, said Thursday that it planned to convert as many as 25 stations to a Spanish-language format, capitalizing on the fastest-growing population segment in the U.S. The number of stations broadcasting in Spanish will climb from 18 in the next year, San Antonio-based Clear Channel said. Spanish-language stations will account for about 2% of its 1,200 stations.
NEWS
July 22, 2004 | Steve Carney
Howard Stern registered a big jump in his local morning radio audience this spring, according to figures released by Arbitron this week, but KLSX-FM (97.1) can't brag about it. The station's parent company, Infinity Broadcasting Corp., severed ties with the ratings service last month in a fee dispute. While the ratings service will still include Infinity stations in its rankings, none of the chain's 185 stations nationwide can cite new, or even previous, ratings figures in any context.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saul Levine is feeling real jazzed these days--even though jazz has nothing to do with it. Levine, the general manager and president of KKGO-FM (105.1), appears to have turned the fortunes of his radio station around--with a little help from Bach, Beethoven and Mozart. The fact that he angered a devoted audience in the process is of little consequence to him now.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1997 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last month's high-profile switch by KSCA-FM (101.9) from English-language pop to Spanish-language music brought home to a lot of listeners the phenomenon of the Southland's rapidly changing radio market. Suddenly, you could tune in to 17 Spanish outlets out of 82 stations in Los Angeles and Orange counties--the largest and fastest growing Spanish radio market in the nation. Forty years ago, there was one full-time Spanish-language station here, KWKW-AM (1330).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
It's a tense moment in National Public Radio's Culver City studios as the staff of "Day to Day" attempts to work through the endless challenges of producing a major new show. NPR veteran J.J. Sutherland is guiding his crew through the details of completing one of the final dry runs for the first weekday news magazine NPR has launched since "Morning Edition" was created 24 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An AM radio station has become the first to begin targeting San Diego's Asian community, introducing a format of music in Mandarin Chinese and Vietnamese. New York-based MultiCultural Radio Broadcasting Inc. last week reached an agreement with Jefferson-Pilot Broadcasting, owner of the AM 1240 station. The channel previously broadcast the youth-oriented Radio Disney.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|