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BUSINESS
October 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo said he would sue Arbitron Inc., accusing it of fraudulent business practices related to the company's new method of rating radio broadcasting, which he said seemed unfair to minority stations. Mobile-phone-size devices carried by listeners pick up information identifying radio stations. Cuomo said the meters might not adequately represent young black and Latino listeners; mobile-phone-only households, which tend to have young and minority-group people; and people who don't speak English.
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SPORTS
March 2, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
The Dodgers are not only planning to add a Korean-language TV broadcast next season, but they also are looking at adding Korean-language radio broadcasts, possibly as soon as the coming season, a source said. The Dodgers are reacting mostly to interest generated in Southern California's Korean community by the addition of starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu, who is attempting to become the first Korean to go directly to the major leagues. The left-hander is currently scheduled to be part of the Dodgers' starting rotation this season.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Bob Pittman, best known for his stints as the founder of MTV, the president of AOL Inc. when it was still called American Online, and the chief executive of Six Flags Entertainment Corp., has coasted over to Clear Channel Communications Inc. as the radio conglomerate's chairman of media and entertainment platforms. For the 57-year-old New York-based executive, the move in November to the nation's largest radio broadcaster was not so much a stretch into yet another entertainment medium as a return to his roots.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Clifton E. Moore, who started a unique radio ministry in Los Angeles in 1948, one since copied by hundreds of other clergymen across America, has died in Irvine at 81. Moore, a Presbyterian minister and former chairman of radio and TV for the Southern California Council of Churches and for the Los Angeles Church Federation, died Saturday at his home in the Orange County city.
NEWS
July 11, 1986 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Negotiations between the United States and Cuba on the resumption of Cuban emigration to America have collapsed, and no further meetings have been scheduled, the State Department said Thursday. A U.S. delegation led by Michael G. Kozak, State Department deputy legal adviser, met with a Cuban contingent led by Ricardo Alarcon, a deputy foreign minister for North American affairs, in Mexico City on Tuesday and Wednesday.
OPINION
October 22, 2009
Re "Vin Scully's is a rare voice," Column, Oct. 19 Just finished reading Hector Tobar's wonderful column about the great Vin Scully. I have noticed more and more printed stories about Vin recently; I am assuming it's because, regretfully, he is nearing his retirement from the airwaves. My family moved to the L.A. region in 1965. That was the first time I was treated to the voice of the Dodgers. Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale and Maury Wills sprang to life wherever there was a radio broadcasting the game.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to repeal the fairness doctrine, prompting key proponents in Congress to renew vows to place into law the 38-year-old policy requiring broadcasters to air all sides of important public issues. The commission called the doctrine unconstitutional, saying that it inhibits free speech by discouraging broadcasters from making certain documentaries or taking controversial editorial stands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ivan Scott, 78, a broadcaster whose reports on the Pentagon were heard on a number of stations across the country including KNX-AM (1070) news radio and KABC-AM (790) in Los Angeles, died March 10 of a brain tumor at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C. Scott's distinctive baritone voice was heard for more than 20 years as a military-affairs and national-security correspondent. He had been an anchor for ABC and Mutual radio. A native of Washington, Scott graduated from Princeton University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1997
Oxnard resident Lester Hayworth, whose baritone voice was familiar to Lancaster and San Bernardino radio listeners through the early 1970s, died Saturday at his home after a lengthy illness. He was 79. Hayworth was born Feb. 27, 1918, in Gothenburg, Neb. In the mid-1930s, he joined the Navy. When his tour was up in 1940, he moved to Los Angeles, where he met his future wife, Mae. They planned to be married Dec.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2010 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Howard Stern, the self-described "king of all media," will continue his reign with Sirius XM Radio Inc. Ending speculation that he would take his show to the next frontier ? whatever that might be ? the radio personality said on his morning show Thursday that he had signed a new deal that would keep him with satellite radio broadcaster Sirius XM for five more years. Stern, who turns 57 next month, did not reveal details of the pact, but word that he was staying put was enough for investors to drive up Sirius XM stock about 20% in early-morning trading.
SPORTS
October 20, 2010 | Chris Erskine
Where were you during "Fernandomania," about 30 years ago? As a 14-year-old, Paul Haddad taped the radio broadcasts and edited them together, turning Vin Scully's calls of that 1981 season into personal keepsakes. It was, for the L.A. boy, a meeting of two masters: the pitching prodigy from a dusty Steinbeckian village in Mexico and the Bronx-born broadcaster at peak form ... baseball's velvet fog. And the ultimate L.A. marriage. "The best part is, at any given moment, I get to relive Scully in some of his finest moments," Haddad, now a freelance documentary producer, says of his collection of tapes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2010 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles judge overseeing a lawsuit by Nicaraguan banana workers against food giant Dole said Monday that she was concerned for her safety and the safety of witnesses due to escalating unrest in the Central American country. "Statements made in radio broadcasts and a press conference were pretty direct against me, or this court," 2nd District Court of Appeals Judge Victoria G. Chaney said after hearing evidence presented to her by Dole attorneys in a closed hearing. She did not elaborate on what the statements were.
SPORTS
June 6, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Here's how Jack Ramsay learned to become an NBA radio analyst: Back in the mid-1990s, after his accomplished basketball coaching career, ESPN Radio offered Ramsay a job alongside the man Ramsay calls the best play-by-play talent in the country, Jim Durham. Ramsay told Durham he wasn't sure about how to do this radio thing. "I think we worked it out well," Ramsay said Sunday before he, Durham and Hubie Brown called Game 2 of the NBA Finals at Staples Center. "Jim takes the action up to the score, then after the score he will pause and if I have something to say about the strategy or what a coach has done or what a player has tried that got him open, then I'll say it and then I'll give Jim the microphone back," Ramsay said.
OPINION
October 22, 2009
Re "Vin Scully's is a rare voice," Column, Oct. 19 Just finished reading Hector Tobar's wonderful column about the great Vin Scully. I have noticed more and more printed stories about Vin recently; I am assuming it's because, regretfully, he is nearing his retirement from the airwaves. My family moved to the L.A. region in 1965. That was the first time I was treated to the voice of the Dodgers. Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale and Maury Wills sprang to life wherever there was a radio broadcasting the game.
WORLD
April 12, 2009 | John M. Glionna
They were just a jumble of conversations overhead on a train. But for South Korean radio station founder Young Howard, they represented breaking news from a hostile, inaccessible land. When North Korea recently defied international calls for restraint and launched a rocket, purportedly to put a satellite in orbit, it wasn't long before a covert correspondent there was on her cellphone to editors in Seoul. People were celebrating a colossal success, she whispered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1998
Richard Beebe, 68, a local radio broadcaster for nearly 50 years. Born in Pasadena and brought up in Alhambra, Beebe began his career in 1949 as a disc jockey in Santa Fe, N.M. After serving in the Air Force, he attended Pasadena City College and studied theater arts at the Pasadena Playhouse. Waiting for success as an actor, he worked in Los Angeles freight yards and returned to the air as a relief worker at KRKD.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | Associated Press
Radio broadcasts from the Senate floor began Wednesday, marking what proponents hailed as a new era in openness after decades of complaints that going on the air would shatter tradition and decorum. "There's no turning back," Minority Leader Robert C. Byrd, (D-W.Va.) told an opening ceremony. "The Senate is crossing the bridge, and it's being burned behind us."
BUSINESS
October 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo said he would sue Arbitron Inc., accusing it of fraudulent business practices related to the company's new method of rating radio broadcasting, which he said seemed unfair to minority stations. Mobile-phone-size devices carried by listeners pick up information identifying radio stations. Cuomo said the meters might not adequately represent young black and Latino listeners; mobile-phone-only households, which tend to have young and minority-group people; and people who don't speak English.
NATIONAL
June 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission is recommending approval of a $5-billion merger between the nation's two satellite radio broadcasters in exchange for concessions that include turning over 24 channels to noncommercial and minority programming. That condition -- along with others, including a three-year price freeze for consumers -- convinced FCC Chairman Kevin J. Martin on Sunday to recommend approval for Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.'
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