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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1997
Longtime Lancaster radio personality Lester Hayworth died Saturday at his home in Oxnard after a lengthy illness. He was 79. Hayworth was born Feb. 27, 1918, in Gothenburg, Neb. In the mid-1930s, he joined the Navy. When his tour was up in 1940, he moved to Los Angeles, where he met his future wife, Mae. They planned to be married Dec. 7, 1941, in Las Vegas, but their plans were put on hold briefly by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. "Everything that day just kind of went kooky . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an unusual and cheery holiday departure, the Orange Coast College theater department takes audiences back to the glory days of radio in "The Lutz Radio Theatre Holiday Show of 1947." Radio was probably never this helter-skelter, but director Alex Golson and his cast nicely capture the atmosphere. The show was first done a decade ago, and the script--by Golson and the casts of both this production and the 1987 one--is inventive and often very funny.
SPORTS
March 2, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
The Dodgers are not only planning to add a Korean-language TV broadcast next season, but they also are looking at adding Korean-language radio broadcasts, possibly as soon as the coming season, a source said. The Dodgers are reacting mostly to interest generated in Southern California's Korean community by the addition of starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu, who is attempting to become the first Korean to go directly to the major leagues. The left-hander is currently scheduled to be part of the Dodgers' starting rotation this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public-radio station KUSC-FM (91.5) said Wednesday it will begin airing President Clinton's weekly radio broadcasts Saturday, making it the only Los Angeles-area outlet to carry the five-minute address. The broadcast will be aired live from the Oval Office each Saturday at 7:06 a.m. PST, then will be repeated on tape at 3:50 p.m., followed by a Republican Party rebuttal broadcast.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1990
Public radio station KCRW-FM (89.9 FM) and the BBC are co-producing a live broadcast at the Irvine Barclay Theatre tonight at 8. "You Say Potato" is billed as "a celebration of two nations divided by a common language." Scheduled performers include Americans Paul Winfield, Madeline Kahn and Hector Elizondo and Britons Prunella Scales, Joanna Lumley and Martin Jarvis.
NEWS
January 8, 1985 | United Press International
President Reagan will resume his weekly Saturday radio broadcasts after his second inauguration on Jan. 21, a spokesman said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1995 | MARY F. POLS
Joining together for the last time before the special election Tuesday, the Thousand Oaks City Council candidates will debate in a radio broadcast on KNJO-FM Sunday morning. Councilman Andy Fox will host the hourlong broadcast from 9 to 10 a.m. Fox said all five candidates have agreed to participate. KNJO airs at 92.7 FM in Thousand Oaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1995 | JEFF BEAN
Every Friday two students are summoned to the principal's office at Bathgate Elementary School. But not because they're in trouble. Instead, the students deliver news to a South County radio audience of about 25,000 through a partnership with Saddleback College radio station KSBR-FM. The 60-second spots produced by the students air during the radio station's noon news broadcast. They can serve as a nerve-racking way for students to learn the value of research and practice.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | MERCER CROSS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
On the airwaves in Albania or Zambia, its trademark sounds are the same: the distinctive musical signature, Christus Vincit --Christ conquers--and the familiar Latin call sign, Laudetur Iesus Christus --Let Jesus Christ be praised. Vatican Radio has been delivering the message of the Roman Catholic Church to the world for 61 years. It has been jammed but never silenced, even in war.
NEWS
April 27, 1985 | Associated Press
The Constitution's free-speech clause prevents the government from revoking the license of a radio station in Kansas even though it urged listeners to kill Jews, the Federal Communications Commission ruled Friday. However, the commission directed its staff to examine other issues, such as the basic character qualifications of the station's owners, in deciding whether they deserve renewal of their license to operate a station in Dodge City, Kan. FCC Chairman Mark S.
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