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NEWS
December 2, 2004
All-star concerts have become as much a part of the holiday landscape as mall Santas. Among the first of these radio station promotions are the "Jingle Ball" from Top 40 powerhouse KIIS-FM (102.7) and the "Not So Silent Night" from adult-contemporary station Star 98.7-FM. Both are at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim this year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2009
SERIES Britain's Missing Top Model: This new unscripted series revolves around eight women, all aspiring models, each with a disability. In the premiere the contestants model lingerie in the main street window of a popular clothing retailer, proving how comfortable they are (or aren't) with their bodies and their disabilities (6 and 9 p.m. BBC America). The Biggest Loser: The winning weight loser is revealed in the two-hour season finale (8 p.m. NBC). NCIS: Los Angeles: Callen and Hanna (Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J)
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NEWS
October 13, 2005 | Susan Carpenter
Today's baby boomer and Gen-X parents weren't alive during radio's 1930s heyday, but it's these TV-weaned parents who are bringing their computer-savvy kids to the Museum of Television & Radio to experience that long-gone era. Each Saturday, the museum hosts a Re-creating Radio workshop for 20 kids to do exactly that: act and produce the sound effects for a retro radio drama. "Kids today are very aware of the new technology.
NEWS
October 13, 2005 | Susan Carpenter
Today's baby boomer and Gen-X parents weren't alive during radio's 1930s heyday, but it's these TV-weaned parents who are bringing their computer-savvy kids to the Museum of Television & Radio to experience that long-gone era. Each Saturday, the museum hosts a Re-creating Radio workshop for 20 kids to do exactly that: act and produce the sound effects for a retro radio drama. "Kids today are very aware of the new technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1987 | NORMAN CORWIN, Corwin, now a member of the faculty in the School of Journalism at USC, was a writer-director-producer in the golden days of radio.
There were radio days and radio days--Woody Allen's in Rockaway, Farmer Pete's in Iowa, Pat Casey's in Boston, Lulubelle Mae's in Biloxi, Spike's in Laramie, Aunt Carrie's in Eagle Rock. What gripped radio's first audiences was the medium, not the message. Content mattered less than the distance over which a program was heard. Fans in the East would stay up until 3 a.m. to try to pull in Chicago, and if they succeeded they bragged about it next day.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
If quite a bit of theater found its way onto radio in 1988 (particularly through the joint auspices of KCRW-FM and L.A. Classic Theatre), radio as medium and subject matter will raise a couple of stage curtains in 1989. Traditionally, Stage Watch sweeps into the new year by taking a look at some of the more promising and/or offbeat offerings coming to smaller theaters. There seems to be no shortage of such items, in spite of the Waiver Wars of '88. Life in the trenches goes on.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear . . . to the late 1930s, when everything you knew about the world came from a brown, cathedral-shaped radio--and your imagination. Come away to Woody Allen's heartfelt, evocative "Radio Days," a movie that draws you close to it like listeners around that glowing radio dial. (It opens today at selected theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1998 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sure, the movie "Titanic" pulled off some colossal special effects. But if you want a taste of raw imagination, step back in time to the radio days of half a century ago. You can do that this weekend in Ventura when a local theater group re-creates a live radio broadcast of Edgar Allan Poe's "Tales to Tremble By."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2002 | SUSAN KING
Whenever Stacy Keach feels he needs to flex his acting muscles, he knows he can always get a good workout doing a radio play for L.A. Theatre Works' "The Play's the Thing" series. Keach, a founder of the radio theater company who describes himself as one of its "long-tooth" members, has strutted his thespian stuff in several of the group's productions during the past 14 years, including "The Crucible" and "The Country Girl."
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | MATTHEW J. ROSENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like many other Jamaicans, Christopher Castriota spends his afternoons listening to the radio. But he gets paid for it: As director of community relations at the Ministry of Water, Castriota monitors radio talk shows to find out where taps are dry. "On many occasions when people have problems with their water, they don't call the ministry or the water commission," Castriota says with a sigh. "They jump on the phone and call a talk show!" It's not surprising.
NEWS
December 2, 2004
All-star concerts have become as much a part of the holiday landscape as mall Santas. Among the first of these radio station promotions are the "Jingle Ball" from Top 40 powerhouse KIIS-FM (102.7) and the "Not So Silent Night" from adult-contemporary station Star 98.7-FM. Both are at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2003
MANY try to imitate Howard Stern, invariably without success ("King Stern's Legacy: He Launched the Raunch," by Brian Lowry, Jan. 1). Few understand the true reason for his popularity. It's not the raunchiness, vulgarity or mean-spiritedness. When I tune in, I hear real people speaking the way we do while among friends. To put that on the radio was a stroke of genius, in an industry defined by phoniness. Holden Caulfield would have been a loyal listener. Tony Elka Studio City ONE must agree -- irrespective of how distasteful the acceptance -- that Brian Lowry is absolutely correct that Howard Stern "launched the raunch."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2002 | SUSAN KING
Whenever Stacy Keach feels he needs to flex his acting muscles, he knows he can always get a good workout doing a radio play for L.A. Theatre Works' "The Play's the Thing" series. Keach, a founder of the radio theater company who describes himself as one of its "long-tooth" members, has strutted his thespian stuff in several of the group's productions during the past 14 years, including "The Crucible" and "The Country Girl."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone knows what Charles A. Lindbergh accomplished in the summer of 1927. But what about Charles A. Levine? Who knew that Levine, a self-made millionaire in the junk business, flew the Atlantic just two weeks after Lindbergh? Who knew--or, more to the point, even cared--that, too late to sponsor the first pilot, Levine settled for being the world's first transatlantic passenger? The listeners to Yiddish radio, that's who knew. And cared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coronations of kings and outbreaks of war. Civic triumphs and cultural changes. For nearly 70 years the engineers on Melrose Avenue were ear-witnesses to it all. They recorded the West's first wireless broadcasts. They produced the pioneering radio commercials that helped shape Southern California's laid-back car culture. They helped create some of the record industry's bestsellers. But on Friday they'll switch off the last vacuum-tube amplifier and unplug the last 50-year-old audiotape console.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the time she was 4, she wanted to be an actress. At 22 she leaped, with an hour's notice to memorize the whole script, from lowly bridesmaid into the high heels and veil of an ailing Dorothy Gish to star in "The Bride the Sun Shines On" on Broadway. A year later she became one of the earliest female voices on that newfangled medium called radio. And on Christmas night 1935, she signed on as Ruby, the wife of Amos on the indelible "Amos 'n' Andy" for a 20-year run.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Radio Days: Deborah Norville returns to the airwaves in September, but on a different network and a different medium. The ABC Radio Network said Sunday that its more than 200 stations will carry the former co-host of NBC-TV's "Today" in place of Sally Jessy Raphael, who wants to concentrate on her TV talk show. Norville, who left "Today" in February when she had a baby, will vary the radio show's call-in focus with interviews and discussion with callers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Hope and Glory"--John Boorman's autobiographical film set in London during the Blitz--and "Jean de Florette," the first in a two-part French saga starring Yves Montand, took the most nominations Tuesday for the 1987 British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards. "Hope and Glory" led the way with 13 nominations, while "Jean de Florette" received 10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2000 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear . . . " That's how the radio announcer introduced millions of kids to the Lone Ranger when youngsters listened to his adventures while they did their homework. Their minds made up what the characters looked like, the costumes, the scenery and the settings. It was magical. Kids used their imaginations.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron McCoy, a Los Angeles radio host dubbed the "dean of late night talk radio" who chucked a half-century career on the airwaves to become a Religious Science minister, has died. He was 72. McCoy, who hosted KFI's "Night Owl Show" from 1961 to 1978, died of cancer Dec. 10 in Los Angeles. Known for his melodious voice, sense of humor and nonconfrontational style, McCoy estimated that he fielded between 8,000 and 10,000 phone calls a year during that 17-year run.
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