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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Laura Ellen Hopper, an early broadcaster of Americana roots music who co-founded a Central California radio station that was a pioneer in Internet programming, has died. She was 57. Days after being diagnosed with lung cancer, Hopper died from complications of the disease May 28 at Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz, said her husband, Frank Caprista.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2013 | By Meg James, This post has been corrected
Classic R&B and hip-hop radio station KDAY-FM (93.5) has been sold to Meruelo Media, a Los Angeles company that has been expanding its holdings. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed. The station had been on the market for more than two years. Earlier this year, another company attempted a nearly $20-million deal to buy KDAY from Magic Broadcasting of Florida, but that deal fell apart. The previous group, RBC Communications, had planned to switch the format to Mandarin language, which startled some longtime listeners.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2009 | Steve Carney
After more than 40 years as an all-news outlet, KFWB-AM (980) said Monday that it is switching to a talk format, led by nationally syndicated advice guru Laura Schlessinger, who moves her flagship from top-rated chat station KFI-AM (640). The change takes effect Sept. 8, when KFWB yokes its format change to Schlessinger, whose program has the third-largest national audience in talk radio -- an estimated 8.25 million listeners per week, behind only Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity, according to Talkers magazine, trade journal of the talk-radio industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2012
Harold 'Hal' Jackson Pioneering African American on network radio Harold "Hal" Jackson, 96, the first African American voice on network radio, died Wednesday at a New York City hospital, said Deon Levingston, an executive at WBLS, a station owned by Inner City Broadcasting Corp., which Jackson co-founded. The cause was not given. Jackson began his career in Washington, D.C,. as the first African American play-by-play sports announcer. After he moved to New York in the 1950s, he hosted three different radio shows, broadcasting a mix of music and conversation that included jazz and celebrities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1987
In the Popping Off column on May 10, Chris Willman criticized the "classic rock" radio format for its narrow definition of classic rock and for discouraging diversity in programming. Here's a sample of reader response. The pioneer spirit of rock 'n' roll is alive and well, and I would direct those who have not already done so to turn their radios to the left end of the dial and tune in any college station they can. My favorite is KSPC (which comes in at the beach with a good antenna)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1990 | Shauna Snow, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
All-Led Zeppelin Format: A Florida radio station has switched to what it claims--and who would doubt them?--is the world's only all-Led Zeppelin radio format. WKRL-FM in Clearwater made the cutover on New Year's Day after spending New Year's Eve repeatedly playing the 1971 hit "Stairway to Heaven." Led Zeppelin is "just a very, very strong classic rock group, very prolific and engaging," said Daniel DiLoreto, manager of WKRL, which until Monday was the Tampa area's "only classic rock station."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2010 | By Carla Rivera
Gene Chenault, one half of a pioneering team that helped to revolutionize rock radio programming in the 1960s with the "Boss Radio" format, first at KHJ in Los Angeles and then coast to coast, has died. He was 90. Chenault died of non-Hodgkin lymphoma Tuesday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center, said his wife, Susan. In the 1960s, Chenault partnered with Bill Drake to launch a phenomenally successful radio format that turned poorly performing stations into ratings winners and made household names of radio personalities such as Robert W. Morgan and "the Real" Don Steele.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2009 | Steve Carney
After more than 40 years as an all-news outlet, KFWB-AM (980) said Monday that it is switching to a talk format, led by nationally syndicated advice guru Laura Schlessinger, who moves her flagship from top-rated chat station KFI-AM (640). The change takes effect Sept. 8, when KFWB yokes its format change to Schlessinger, whose program has the third-largest national audience in talk radio -- an estimated 8.25 million listeners per week, behind only Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity, according to Talkers magazine, trade journal of the talk-radio industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Laura Ellen Hopper, an early broadcaster of Americana roots music who co-founded a Central California radio station that was a pioneer in Internet programming, has died. She was 57. Days after being diagnosed with lung cancer, Hopper died from complications of the disease May 28 at Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz, said her husband, Frank Caprista.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2004 | From the Washington Post
The rock era isn't over, but if tastes in radio listening are any guide, it sure is waning. Oldies aren't necessarily goodies anymore. And Americans can't get enough talk. An Arbitron ratings report on what Americans listen to on the radio now and over the last decade reveals clear trends in listening. Black-oriented stations show the strongest gains, from 7.7% of total audience in 1999 to 10.5% this summer. Over that same time, rock's share of the audience fell from 9.8% to 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
Kasey Chambers is the ultimate in cool on the cover of her new album, "Barricades & Brickwalls." Staring seductively at the camera as she walks down the street dangling a guitar in hand, she looks like the maverick love child of Steve Earle and Lucinda Williams. The Australian singer-songwriter brings the character and independence of that pairing to the album's defiant title track--a rowdy, feminist declaration that runs counter to all the helpless waif songs in pop music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
Don't cry for Mariah Carey. The pop diva might have been rudely dumped by Virgin Records, but she walks away with almost as much money ($49 million) as some of those Enron executives. And everyone knows rival labels are lining up to sign the Long Island native with a low-ball offer, knowing that she needs desperately to reestablish herself after her recent album and movie flops.
NEWS
May 29, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 40 years, federal law has prohibited broadcasters from accepting money or anything of value in exchange for playing songs on the radio without disclosing the practice to listeners. But internal documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times indicate that several independent promoters keep detailed logs--called "banks"--listing the date a station airs a song followed by a dollar amount collected from the artist's label.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1996 | FRANK MALFITANO, Frank Malfitano is a freelance writer
Once again, that most frightening and heinous term in the radio lexicon has reared its ugly head: Format Change. This time, the local station undergoing a complete overhaul is KPCC, the much-loved FM station of Pasadena City College ("Morning Report," Calendar, June 26). For years the station has played a superb mix of what it billed as Classic American Music--everything from John Philip Sousa to Duke Ellington, with stops at Bessie Smith and Jimmie Rodgers in between.
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