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Radio Free Asia

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March 13, 1994 | Associated Press
Myanmar's military government criticized a U.S. move to set up a radio service to promote democracy in Asia, state-run radio reported Friday. The broadcast quoted an unnamed foreign ministry official as telling a U.S. diplomat that the Senate's Feb. 2 decision to set up Radio Free Asia was "unjustifiable" and would not be helpful for relations between the two countries. The U.S. government-run station would be aimed at Myanmar, China, North Korea, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam.
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WORLD
February 2, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- The most prominent Uighur intellectual in China was taken into custody Saturday at Beijing's international airport with his daughter as he tried to board a flight for the United States. The detention of Beijing professor Ilham Tohti recalled the circumstances of artist Ai Weiwei's detention in 2011 at the airport. Tohti is an economist who teaches at the Central Minorities University and runs a website, Uighurbiz.net. "I, Ilham Tohti originally planned to go to the U.S. They stopped me and prevented me from leaving.
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NEWS
October 1, 1997 | JIM MANN
Here's a Washington version of a man-bites-dog story, one that runs contrary to stereotype: Despite their proclivity for budget cutting, Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) and the House Republicans--with the support of President Clinton--are creating a big new Washington organization. They got it up and running from scratch last year and are in the process of quadrupling its budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2001
"An Honest Radio Voice" (editorial, Oct. 11) says that the Voice of America is charged with providing "accurate, objective and comprehensive" news, while Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty is involved with "frank advocacy" and "tell[ing] the story Washington's way." In fact, VOA, RFE/RL and Radio Free Asia--all of the stations that operate under the supervision of the Broadcasting Board of Governors--are required to provide precisely the kind of accurate and objective news your editorial suggests is the province of VOA alone.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | JIM MANN
Over the weekend, America took a little-noticed but far-reaching step in its policy toward Asia--one that is likely to arouse the ire of China, Myanmar (Burma) and other repressive governments. Radio Free Asia went on the air. The new broadcast station, created by Congress to serve as an Asian counterpart to Radio Free Europe, started modestly and quietly Sunday, with a half-hour news broadcast to China. Plans are for the program to be aired each day at 7 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1994 | JOSHUA MURAVCHIK, Joshua Muravchik, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, was a member of the Commission on Broadcasting to the People's Republic of China. and
The Clinton Administration's China-policy debacle might have been averted had the President made good on his campaign pledge to launch Radio Free Asia. When the Iron Curtain was lifted, we learned from Lech Walesa, Vaclav Havel and countless citizens of Eastern Europe that Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty had been more effective than we knew.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of a major presidential trip, the Clinton administration on Monday officially protested to the Chinese for barring three journalists who were part of the White House press entourage from entering China. The three work for Radio Free Asia, the independent but U.S. government-funded network that broadcasts news and programs promoting the value of democracy into China and several other Asian countries where censorship is prevalent.
NEWS
January 12, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moses Sun came to the tiny South Pacific island of Belau to spread the word of Jesus to his native China. But last week, when his Voice of Hope radio station on the island east of the Philippines began transmitting Radio Free Asia broadcasts into China, Sun reluctantly found himself on the front lines of America's controversial new shortwave radio service aimed at the People's Republic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1997 | KEN WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radio Free Asia is expected to begin broadcasts to Vietnam this week, a move being hailed in Orange County's large Vietnamese community, where thousands of expatriates have an active interest in their homeland. The broadcasts start Thursday to coincide with the Lunar New Year, or Tet, celebrations. "I feel very excited, and I'm sure the Vietnamese of Orange County will be excited as well," said Minh Cong Tran, a member of the Orange County Radio Free Asia Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2001
"An Honest Radio Voice" (editorial, Oct. 11) says that the Voice of America is charged with providing "accurate, objective and comprehensive" news, while Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty is involved with "frank advocacy" and "tell[ing] the story Washington's way." In fact, VOA, RFE/RL and Radio Free Asia--all of the stations that operate under the supervision of the Broadcasting Board of Governors--are required to provide precisely the kind of accurate and objective news your editorial suggests is the province of VOA alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having problems with your broadcast reception? Call the cable guy. That's what officials will do today when they summon Marc Nathanson to Washington and swear him in as head of the Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, Radio Marti, Radio Free Asia and other international broadcast services operated by the United States. Nathanson, of Westwood, is the founder and CEO of Falcon Cable, a Los Angeles-based company that provides cable television service to 1.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is late afternoon, but here in the studios of Radio Free Asia, Jenny Choi is reading the 7 a.m. news--to North Korea. Speaking softly in Korean, she and a co-anchor report on long-running Korean negotiations, an upcoming visit by an American envoy and discuss the mysterious deaths of 71 cattle shipped to the famine-stricken nation. Every story is about North Korea. "Today we have so much news!" program director Jaehoon Ahn says happily.
NEWS
June 24, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Foreign Ministry on Tuesday dismissed the flap over China's withdrawal of visas for three journalists scheduled to travel with President Clinton on his visit here this week, saying that it had acted according to its regulations governing foreign media. Ministry spokesman Tang Guoqiang declined to specify what rules the three representatives of Radio Free Asia might have violated to warrant the revocation, made just days before the president's departure.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of a major presidential trip, the Clinton administration on Monday officially protested to the Chinese for barring three journalists who were part of the White House press entourage from entering China. The three work for Radio Free Asia, the independent but U.S. government-funded network that broadcasts news and programs promoting the value of democracy into China and several other Asian countries where censorship is prevalent.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | JIM MANN
Here's a Washington version of a man-bites-dog story, one that runs contrary to stereotype: Despite their proclivity for budget cutting, Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) and the House Republicans--with the support of President Clinton--are creating a big new Washington organization. They got it up and running from scratch last year and are in the process of quadrupling its budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1997 | KEN WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radio Free Asia is expected to begin broadcasts to Vietnam this week, a move being hailed in Orange County's large Vietnamese community, where thousands of expatriates have an active interest in their homeland. The broadcasts start Thursday to coincide with the Lunar New Year, or Tet, celebrations. "I feel very excited, and I'm sure the Vietnamese of Orange County will be excited as well," said Minh Cong Tran, a member of the Orange County Radio Free Asia Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996
Radio Free Asia debuted this weekend with a short broadcast to China. The subdued launching was a milestone in a five-year effort in Washington to use the airwaves to promote democratic values across the Pacific. The goal of the Asian counterpart to Radio Free Europe is to foster openness and democracy by freely disseminating news. Congress created the new station, which began with two daily half-hour news broadcasts to China.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996
Re Jim Mann's "After 5 Years of Political Wrangling, Radio Free Asia Becomes a Reality," Sept. 30, and your Oct. 1 editorial: It is true that, on average, 20% to 25% of Voice of America Tibetan's two hours of daily programming is news about Tibet. But we don't limit this coverage. It's just hard to pry verifiable news out of the region, and we broadcast all we get. The proportion of Tibet-related material in our shows is, at times, much higher. This past week, for example, one-third was Tibet-related.
NEWS
January 12, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moses Sun came to the tiny South Pacific island of Belau to spread the word of Jesus to his native China. But last week, when his Voice of Hope radio station on the island east of the Philippines began transmitting Radio Free Asia broadcasts into China, Sun reluctantly found himself on the front lines of America's controversial new shortwave radio service aimed at the People's Republic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996
Re Jim Mann's "After 5 Years of Political Wrangling, Radio Free Asia Becomes a Reality," Sept. 30, and your Oct. 1 editorial: It is true that, on average, 20% to 25% of Voice of America Tibetan's two hours of daily programming is news about Tibet. But we don't limit this coverage. It's just hard to pry verifiable news out of the region, and we broadcast all we get. The proportion of Tibet-related material in our shows is, at times, much higher. This past week, for example, one-third was Tibet-related.
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