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Radio Free Berkeley

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NEWS
March 5, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nerve center of a nationwide and rapidly growing renegade radio broadcasting movement lies here, in the cluttered and dimly lit home of a frail, soft-spoken radio technician. Stephen Dunifer, founder of Free Radio Berkeley, is regarded by many micro-broadcasters as the primary technical and inspirational force behind a movement that is defying the federal government's regulation of the airwaves.
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NEWS
March 5, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nerve center of a nationwide and rapidly growing renegade radio broadcasting movement lies here, in the cluttered and dimly lit home of a frail, soft-spoken radio technician. Stephen Dunifer, founder of Free Radio Berkeley, is regarded by many micro-broadcasters as the primary technical and inspirational force behind a movement that is defying the federal government's regulation of the airwaves.
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BUSINESS
October 5, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER Jr.
Supporters of the free radio movement gathered in Washington during the weekend to share their radio engineering skills and protest the Federal Communications Commission's crackdown on unlicensed radio operators. Relations between the federal agency and radio pirates have become increasingly strained since the U.S.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could spark a wave of nonprofit, grass-roots radio stations, federal regulators today are expected to open the nation's airwaves to hundreds of new low-power FM stations. The initiative by the Federal Communications Commission would let schools, churches and even some former radio pirates who had flouted the FCC's licensing rules to apply for federal authorization to run noncommercial stations. These stations would have as much as 100 watts of power.
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