Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRadio Free China
IN THE NEWS

Radio Free China

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to pressure from Congress, the Bush Administration announced Wednesday that it will go along with a proposal to study the creation of a new "Radio Free China," similar to the U.S.-sponsored broadcasts that for decades have promoted the causes of freedom and democracy in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. The announcement seemed to be aimed at heading off another dispute with Capitol Hill over U.S. policy toward China.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2001
It is quite probable that this generation and a few others do not understand the situation of being totally unprepared. In view of the recent touchy incident with China and other developments around the world, it might be a better idea for President Bush to junk his tax proposal for the moment. Instead of returning money to the taxpayers, let's build our military back to something worthwhile. Bill Clinton has said that our military is the most powerful in the world. We also thought that prior to World War II. Again, in view of developing situations around the world, it just might be the right thing to consider.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2001
It is quite probable that this generation and a few others do not understand the situation of being totally unprepared. In view of the recent touchy incident with China and other developments around the world, it might be a better idea for President Bush to junk his tax proposal for the moment. Instead of returning money to the taxpayers, let's build our military back to something worthwhile. Bill Clinton has said that our military is the most powerful in the world. We also thought that prior to World War II. Again, in view of developing situations around the world, it just might be the right thing to consider.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Would U.S. broadcasting to Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union go better with Coca-Cola? The possibility of commercials to ease the taxpayer burden for the American government service--with its $500 million budget--is just one idea suggested by creative thinkers as part of the first full-scale review of U.S. international broadcasting since the Voice of America went on the air during World War II. The prime target for economizers--with the backing of Budget Director Richard G.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Would U.S. broadcasting to Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union go better with Coca-Cola? The possibility of commercials to ease the taxpayer burden for the American government service--with its $500 million budget--is just one idea suggested by creative thinkers as part of the first full-scale review of U.S. international broadcasting since the Voice of America went on the air during World War II. The prime target for economizers--with the backing of Budget Director Richard G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | DAVID PESCI, David Pesci is the author of the novel, "Amistad" (Marlowe & Co., 1998)
The Bush administration's so-called resolution (uh, can we have our plane back, too?) of this mini-hostage crisis with China was not only unnecessarily cloying, it was a total cave-in. Yes, the United States should have said it was sorry, several times. However, after hearing the text of the letter, I think President Bush and Secretary of State Colin Powell could have done better. Below is an amended version, which we can still send to Chinese Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan. Dear Mr.
OPINION
July 14, 1991 | James Mann, James Mann, a Times reporter in Washington, formerly was this paper's correspondent in Beijing
It is now becoming clear that despite two years of repeated, fumbling efforts by the Bush Administration, the United States' relationship with China has gone into a profound tailspin. It may well take years to recover. The change is historic, one with broad implications not only for China but for the rest of Asia, which, since the 1970s, has been able to take for granted relatively close regional cooperation between Beijing and Washington.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to pressure from Congress, the Bush Administration announced Wednesday that it will go along with a proposal to study the creation of a new "Radio Free China," similar to the U.S.-sponsored broadcasts that for decades have promoted the causes of freedom and democracy in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. The announcement seemed to be aimed at heading off another dispute with Capitol Hill over U.S. policy toward China.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|