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NEWS
December 27, 1988 | From Reuters
Bulgaria has stopped jamming broadcasts by Radio Free Europe, the last Soviet Bloc country to do so, a spokesman for the U.S. government-financed station said today. Spokesman Bob Redlich said the jamming was halted on Christmas Day. The programs had been scrambled by Bulgarian authorities since the station began broadcasting to Eastern Europe in the early 1950s, Redlich said. Czechoslovakia suspended its jamming of Radio Free Europe 10 days ago and Poland in early 1987.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
One work of literature, arguably more than any other, helped changed the course of Soviet history -- “One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich,” Alexander Solzhenitsyn's novel of one man's descent into Stalin's infamous gulag. “One Day” was published in the Soviet Union 50 years ago this month, a landmark commemorated in a series of stories from Russia. Solzhenitsyn had been arrested during World War II and thrown into a concentration camp for writing letters critical of Stalin to a friend.
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NEWS
May 25, 1992
Harold B. Miller, 89, former head of Radio Free Europe, a naval aviator, a public relations executive and an author. He was a Navy flier on a dirigible during World War II when Adm. Chester W. Nimitz tapped him to be public relations director for the Navy. Nimitz was said to be envious of the extensive press coverage given to Gen. Douglas MacArthur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Gen. Nicolae Plesita, a die-hard communist and ruthless chief of the Securitate secret police who arranged shelter in Romania for terrorist Carlos the Jackal and was tried for the bombing of Radio Free Europe, has died. He was 80. Plesita died Monday in a Romanian Intelligence Service hospital in Bucharest, where he was being treated for various illnesses including diabetes, the Agerpres and Mediafax news agencies reported, citing family members. Plesita commanded the Securitate's foreign intelligence service from 1980 to 1984.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Robert Edward Lang, the first director of Radio Free Europe and a former vice president of both CBS News and ABC News, has died. He was 70. Lang, who died Tuesday of cancer, joined the Free Europe Committee in 1948 as a consultant investigating the feasibility of radio broadcasting into Iron Curtain countries. Radio Free Europe went on the air in 1949 with a staff of 1,800 and 22 transmitters broadcasting to Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary, Albania, Bulgaria and Romania.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A presidential commission recommended Wednesday that Radio Free Europe, the 40-year-old American propaganda operation that broadcasts to Eastern Europe, be phased out in the wake of the collapse of Soviet rule in the region. The recommendation would require action by the Bush Administration. But the unanimous finding, extraordinary for the usually routine annual report by the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, is expected to carry weight.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Declaring that the Cold War is over and that Eastern Europe now enjoys a generally free press, an advisory commission Thursday urged the U.S. government to scrap Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, the services established four decades ago to challenge the Communist monopoly on information behind the Iron Curtain. The commission said the Voice of America should continue to operate and would be enough to spread the American message. Malcolm S. Forbes Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
Jan Nowak-Jezioranski, a wartime courier for the Polish anti-Nazi resistance and the director of Radio Free Europe's Polish service during the Cold War, has died, Polish officials said Friday. He was 91. Nowak-Jezioranski died Thursday in a Warsaw hospital. The cause of death was not reported. "A great Pole, a hero and a great authority has gone," former Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki said on state radio.
NEWS
January 16, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
In a setback for U.S.-Polish relations that had begun to thaw, the Polish government has strongly protested a broadcast by Radio Free Europe earlier this month that drew a parallel between Premier Wojciech Jaruzelski and Adolf Hitler. Western diplomats familiar with the broadcast said it was probably intended as ironic humor but that it showed poor editorial judgment on the part of Radio Free Europe.
NEWS
April 29, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A defector who deserted from the Soviet navy in 1965, then mysteriously disappeared two months ago from his well-paying job at American-run Radio Liberty in Munich, West Germany, surfaced in Moscow on Monday to accuse the broadcast operation of anti-Soviet espionage. Oleg Tumanov, 41, nervously read a prepared statement charging that his station and Radio Free Europe are a front for CIA covert operations aimed at the Soviet Union and other East Bloc states. He referred to the two U.S.
OPINION
June 23, 2009
When weighing a response to an international crisis, a U.S. president defines American interests, examines the political landscape and selects from a menu of generally imperfect options ranging from war to prudent inaction. In the case of Iran, President Obama has rightly determined that it is in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
Jan Nowak-Jezioranski, a wartime courier for the Polish anti-Nazi resistance and the director of Radio Free Europe's Polish service during the Cold War, has died, Polish officials said Friday. He was 91. Nowak-Jezioranski died Thursday in a Warsaw hospital. The cause of death was not reported. "A great Pole, a hero and a great authority has gone," former Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki said on state radio.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House approved legislation Wednesday that would create a Radio Free Afghanistan to tell Washington's side of the story in the war on terrorism, broadcasting news and information in the country's two main languages. "Establishment of a Radio Free Afghanistan is vital to winning the propaganda war," said Rep. Ed Royce (R-Fullerton), the bill's main sponsor.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independent radio stations and civilian authorities, fighting a risky battle to preserve democratic freedoms in Montenegro, on Saturday rejected army demands that local rebroadcasting of foreign news programs be halted. "We are not going to change a thing," declared Tanja Knezevic, editor in chief of Montena Radio, one of the broadcast outlets targeted in the attempted Yugoslav army crackdown. "The intention of the army is to provoke the government. They're doing it through us."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having problems with your broadcast reception? Call the cable guy. That's what officials will do today when they summon Marc Nathanson to Washington and swear him in as head of the Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, Radio Marti, Radio Free Asia and other international broadcast services operated by the United States. Nathanson, of Westwood, is the founder and CEO of Falcon Cable, a Los Angeles-based company that provides cable television service to 1.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | JIM MANN
Over the weekend, America took a little-noticed but far-reaching step in its policy toward Asia--one that is likely to arouse the ire of China, Myanmar (Burma) and other repressive governments. Radio Free Asia went on the air. The new broadcast station, created by Congress to serve as an Asian counterpart to Radio Free Europe, started modestly and quietly Sunday, with a half-hour news broadcast to China. Plans are for the program to be aired each day at 7 a.m.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin granted permission Wednesday for Radio Liberty and Radio Free Europe, the U.S. government's Cold War-era shortwave radio service, to open their first accredited bureau in Moscow and perhaps even be carried on AM or FM bands.
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The sleek, whitewashed apartments in the hilly suburb of Troja spelled luxury. Modern kitchens. Grand bathrooms. Even private quarters for the maid. But for a busload of apartment hunters, none of this mattered. Their sole concern: The former Communist regime had once earmarked the complex for Western diplomats. "I would never live here," grunted one visitor. "I am sure the entire place is bugged by the Communists."
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For some, it's all little more than a show of bureaucratic inertia. After all, why should President Clinton want to preserve two government-funded radio stations, created at the height of the Cold War to challenge the Communist media monopoly behind the Iron Curtain, when the Cold War is over and the curtain, the monopoly and Communist dictatorships have all disappeared?
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