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January 16, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, paying a rare tribute to human rights progress in the Soviet Union, on Sunday called on Moscow to dismantle the powerful transmitters that were used to jam foreign radio broadcasts and to take other steps to guarantee that there will be no backsliding.
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NEWS
January 16, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, paying a rare tribute to human rights progress in the Soviet Union, on Sunday called on Moscow to dismantle the powerful transmitters that were used to jam foreign radio broadcasts and to take other steps to guarantee that there will be no backsliding.
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NEWS
December 18, 1988
Czechoslovakia has stopped jamming Radio Free Europe after two decades, and the U.S.-supported network urged Bulgaria--the only Soviet Bloc country that continues to block its signals--to end the practice. The Czechoslovak government said the jamming ended Friday. "We will be happy to get our message through at last," said Bill Marsh, executive vice president of the Munich, West Germany-based Radio Free Europe.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Officials of the U.S. government-operated Radio Liberty said Friday that the station has received a favorable review in the Soviet press for the first time since it began 35 years ago to broadcast news and commentary to the Soviet Union in defiance of Moscow's censors.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Officials of the U.S. government-operated Radio Liberty said Friday that the station has received a favorable review in the Soviet press for the first time since it began 35 years ago to broadcast news and commentary to the Soviet Union in defiance of Moscow's censors.
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet government has stopped jamming Voice of America radio broadcasts to this country, a U.S. official said Monday. Embassy spokesman Jaroslav Verner said it was the first time since August, 1980, that the Soviets had not interfered with the Voice's broadcasts beamed at the Soviet Union. He said he could offer no explanation for what appeared to be a sudden change of policy in Moscow. In Washington, Charles Z. Wick, director of the U.S.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For some, it's all little more than a show of bureaucratic inertia. After all, why should President Clinton want to preserve two government-funded radio stations, created at the height of the Cold War to challenge the Communist media monopoly behind the Iron Curtain, when the Cold War is over and the curtain, the monopoly and Communist dictatorships have all disappeared?
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
It was like the film "Top Gun," Jim Lindelof once told a reporter, "only we were the targets." He was talking about Soviet-occupied Afghanistan in 1985 and the daily bombing raids by MIG jets that rocked the village where he was working undercover as a medic tending to the sick, the wounded and the dying. He never forgot the sound, or the smell, or the simple fear that gripped his stomach during those three months.
NEWS
December 18, 1988
Czechoslovakia has stopped jamming Radio Free Europe after two decades, and the U.S.-supported network urged Bulgaria--the only Soviet Bloc country that continues to block its signals--to end the practice. The Czechoslovak government said the jamming ended Friday. "We will be happy to get our message through at last," said Bill Marsh, executive vice president of the Munich, West Germany-based Radio Free Europe.
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet government has stopped jamming Voice of America radio broadcasts to this country, a U.S. official said Monday. Embassy spokesman Jaroslav Verner said it was the first time since August, 1980, that the Soviets had not interfered with the Voice's broadcasts beamed at the Soviet Union. He said he could offer no explanation for what appeared to be a sudden change of policy in Moscow. In Washington, Charles Z. Wick, director of the U.S.
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