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Radio Hall Of Fame

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August 9, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Two DJs, two newsmen and a network executive have been selected as the 2006 inductees into the National Radio Hall of Fame. Those selected in balloting conducted by the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago were CBS journalist Christopher Glenn; another CBS newsman, the late Douglas Edwards; New York DJ Scott Shannon; another disc jockey from the Big Apple, the late William B. Williams; and ABC Radio President John Hare. The induction ceremony will take place Nov.
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SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
Saturday night at a black-tie dinner in Chicago, a Dodgers broadcaster will go into the Hall of Fame and it won't be Vin Scully. A shocker? No. Scully is already there. If there is a Hall of Fame that has any connection whatsoever to broadcasting and Scully isn't in it, it's a lousy Hall of Fame. Now, Charley Steiner will be joining him. That means, next year, when fans tune in to Dodgers' baseball, they will be informed and entertained by three Hall of Famers. That's far from the norm, maybe a first, and should make Dodgers fans proud.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2003 | From a Times staff writer
After a run of more than three decades, radio talk-show host Michael Jackson has been off the local airwaves since December. But he's hardly been forgotten. On Monday, it was announced that Jackson, who spent most of his career at KABC-AM (790), is one of this year's selections for the Radio Hall of Fame in Chicago, in recognition of what officials there called "his articulate and incisive commentary and strong interviewing skills." He'll be inducted Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Norman Corwin, the legendary writer, director and producer of original radio plays for CBS during the golden age of radio in the 1930s and '40s when he was revered as the "poet of the airwaves," has died. He was 101. Corwin, a journalist, playwright, author and Oscar-nominated screenwriter who was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1993, died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles, said his caregiver, Chris Borjas. The cause was not given. With his often poetic words, Corwin moved and entertained a generation of listeners tuned to the CBS Radio Network during the late 1930s and '40s, with landmark broadcasts ranging from celebrations of the Bill of Rights and the Allied victory in Europe to a light-hearted rhyming play about a demonic plot to overthrow Christmas.
SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
Saturday night at a black-tie dinner in Chicago, a Dodgers broadcaster will go into the Hall of Fame and it won't be Vin Scully. A shocker? No. Scully is already there. If there is a Hall of Fame that has any connection whatsoever to broadcasting and Scully isn't in it, it's a lousy Hall of Fame. Now, Charley Steiner will be joining him. That means, next year, when fans tune in to Dodgers' baseball, they will be informed and entertained by three Hall of Famers. That's far from the norm, maybe a first, and should make Dodgers fans proud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Norman Corwin, the legendary writer, director and producer of original radio plays for CBS during the golden age of radio in the 1930s and '40s when he was revered as the "poet of the airwaves," has died. He was 101. Corwin, a journalist, playwright, author and Oscar-nominated screenwriter who was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1993, died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles, said his caregiver, Chris Borjas. The cause was not given. With his often poetic words, Corwin moved and entertained a generation of listeners tuned to the CBS Radio Network during the late 1930s and '40s, with landmark broadcasts ranging from celebrations of the Bill of Rights and the Allied victory in Europe to a light-hearted rhyming play about a demonic plot to overthrow Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Hall of Famers: Four radio veterans, along with a legendary program, will be inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame at a black-tie gala Nov. 15 in Chicago. The honorees are Don Ameche, Casey Kasem, Detroit radio personality J.P. McCarthy, radio-TV pioneer Leonard Goldenson and the "Grand Ole Opry," America's longest-running live music and variety radio program. Paul Harvey, a 1990 Radio Hall of Fame inductee, will host.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2003
I was nearly ecstatic to find Michael Jackson's photo on Page E3 in the Quick Takes column Aug. 11, thinking it would be an announcement that he is returning to his "post" as a talk radio host. I was very happy to learn, of course, that he has been selected for the Radio Hall of Fame; he is most worthy of that honor and many others. But is there no radio station that can "afford" to put on this very brilliant, fair-minded, liberal individual? Not even National Public Radio? I will keep looking and hope Michael is too. Robert Wood Manhattan Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1990 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Dick Clark has kept the company of millions during his 43 years in broadcast. But he always plays to an audience of one. "I visualize in my mind, I learned this from my idols of years ago, that there's only one person listening or watching and you direct yourself to that person," Clark said in an interview. "It's a secret that Arthur Godfrey knew very well, Garry Moore knew very well--the pioneers learned that lesson years ago." On Wednesday, Clark was counted among the pioneers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The man who came up with the phrase "beautiful downtown Burbank" is not happy that NBC is considering moving "The Tonight Show" back to New York City. "Burbank is a great little place," said Gary Owens, who coined the phrase from his radio days then made it famous when he was the announcer on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" from 1968 to 1973. "If you are in show business in any way, shape or form, you must be here. "  Johnny Carson, who moved "The Tonight Show" from New York to Los Angeles in 1972, also used the "beautiful downtown Burbank" line but never tried to take credit for it. PHOTOS: Classic 'Tonight Show' moments "He said, 'We're using "beautiful downtown Burbank," and I told him, 'That's fine - not a problem,'" Owens recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Two DJs, two newsmen and a network executive have been selected as the 2006 inductees into the National Radio Hall of Fame. Those selected in balloting conducted by the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago were CBS journalist Christopher Glenn; another CBS newsman, the late Douglas Edwards; New York DJ Scott Shannon; another disc jockey from the Big Apple, the late William B. Williams; and ABC Radio President John Hare. The induction ceremony will take place Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2003 | From a Times staff writer
After a run of more than three decades, radio talk-show host Michael Jackson has been off the local airwaves since December. But he's hardly been forgotten. On Monday, it was announced that Jackson, who spent most of his career at KABC-AM (790), is one of this year's selections for the Radio Hall of Fame in Chicago, in recognition of what officials there called "his articulate and incisive commentary and strong interviewing skills." He'll be inducted Nov.
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