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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
- Last week, one of the strangest promotions in local radio history came to an end when progressive rock station XTRA-FM (91X) awarded 22-year-old Sonia Rodriquez its "Yugo Six-Pack": six 1988 Yugo automobiles, valued at more than $24,000. As one of a half-dozen semi-finalists, Rodriquez chose the correct key to start a Yugo--and thus won all six cars--in a drawing held at the College-area Wherehouse Records store.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Himan Brown, the pioneer radio producer and director of "Grand Central Station," "Inner Sanctum Mysteries" and other popular shows of the 1930s and '40s who returned to the airwaves three decades later with " CBS Radio Mystery Theater," has died. He was 99. Brown died Friday of age-related causes at his longtime apartment on Central Park West in Manhattan, said his granddaughter Melina Brown. In a career in radio that began in the medium's infancy in the late 1920s, the prolific Brown's credits include "The Adventures of the Thin Man," "Bulldog Drummond," "Dick Tracy," "Flash Gordon," "The Adventures of Nero Wolfe," "Terry and the Pirates" and many others.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Himan Brown, the pioneer radio producer and director of "Grand Central Station," "Inner Sanctum Mysteries" and other popular shows of the 1930s and '40s who returned to the airwaves three decades later with " CBS Radio Mystery Theater," has died. He was 99. Brown died Friday of age-related causes at his longtime apartment on Central Park West in Manhattan, said his granddaughter Melina Brown. In a career in radio that began in the medium's infancy in the late 1920s, the prolific Brown's credits include "The Adventures of the Thin Man," "Bulldog Drummond," "Dick Tracy," "Flash Gordon," "The Adventures of Nero Wolfe," "Terry and the Pirates" and many others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Museum of Television & Radio is ringing down the curtain on its annual William S. Paley Festival on Tuesday evening with a tribute to one of the visionaries of the golden age of television. Fred Coe was an innovative and insightful director and producer who was responsible for producing such acclaimed live TV dramas as Paddy Chayefsky's "Marty," "Peter Pan," starring Mary Martin, J.P.
NEWS
August 23, 1998 | Irene Lacher
You probably consider our existence--if you bother to consider our existence--to be a relentless stream of Tara-like balls, nurtured by an endless conveyor belt of sparkling conversation and hors d'oeuvres. The truth is much darker than that. Sometimes we watch TV. Such a breach of Out & Aboutness usually happens when we are behaving like your typical Angeleno--that is, we are on hiatus. Yes, we too have had moments of being In & Watching TV.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several radio buffs who already feel that not enough respect and attention is paid to old-time radio now fear that their wishes to save what they call a valuable historic radio resource is falling on deaf ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Museum of Television & Radio is ringing down the curtain on its annual William S. Paley Festival on Tuesday evening with a tribute to one of the visionaries of the golden age of television. Fred Coe was an innovative and insightful director and producer who was responsible for producing such acclaimed live TV dramas as Paddy Chayefsky's "Marty," "Peter Pan," starring Mary Martin, J.P.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty scripts written for comedian Jack Benny's radio shows have been acquired by the Thousand Oaks Library as part of its collection on radio and television history, officials said Thursday. Librarian Brad Miller said the scripts were purchased from Benny's longtime producer and director, Hilliard Marks, for $1,200. "It's a significant acquisition," Miller said. "It's not a large collection, but it fleshes out what we have from the 1950s."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1990
Re "Sound of Radio Fading at UCLA Archive," July 29: Greg Braxton's article contains many good points, but one is severely misleading and tends to minimize the importance of broadcast "records" held by such archives as the one at UCLA: During radio's classic age, recordings were never, never "used by studios to play programs over the airwaves."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Los ANGELES had never seen an event like this before, an awards show honoring the colorful, raunchy, outrageous array of performers arising from the region's blue-collar Latino neighborhoods. This was the Grammys for the immigrant underground, artists who had built grass-roots followings in barrio nightclubs with swaggering, foul-mouthed songs about drug smugglers, fugitives, coyotes and killers, often spiced with sex and social defiance.
NEWS
August 23, 1998 | Irene Lacher
You probably consider our existence--if you bother to consider our existence--to be a relentless stream of Tara-like balls, nurtured by an endless conveyor belt of sparkling conversation and hors d'oeuvres. The truth is much darker than that. Sometimes we watch TV. Such a breach of Out & Aboutness usually happens when we are behaving like your typical Angeleno--that is, we are on hiatus. Yes, we too have had moments of being In & Watching TV.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty scripts written for comedian Jack Benny's radio shows have been acquired by the Thousand Oaks Library as part of its collection on radio and television history, officials said Thursday. Librarian Brad Miller said the scripts were purchased from Benny's longtime producer and director, Hilliard Marks, for $1,200. "It's a significant acquisition," Miller said. "It's not a large collection, but it fleshes out what we have from the 1950s."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1990
Re "Sound of Radio Fading at UCLA Archive," July 29: Greg Braxton's article contains many good points, but one is severely misleading and tends to minimize the importance of broadcast "records" held by such archives as the one at UCLA: During radio's classic age, recordings were never, never "used by studios to play programs over the airwaves."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several radio buffs who already feel that not enough respect and attention is paid to old-time radio now fear that their wishes to save what they call a valuable historic radio resource is falling on deaf ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were more than just the kings of the radio dial. They were more than just No. 1. They were Boss. More accurately, they were the Boss Jocks, spinning those Boss Hits for an adoring, young and huge Boss Radio audience in Boss Angeles. Even some of their names had more than a hint of Bossness to them--the Real Don Steele, Humble Harve, Dave Diamond, Sam Riddle, Walt Baby Love, Charlie Tuna. Back then, the Beatles were fighting for chart space with the Mamas & the Papas and Dylan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
- Last week, one of the strangest promotions in local radio history came to an end when progressive rock station XTRA-FM (91X) awarded 22-year-old Sonia Rodriquez its "Yugo Six-Pack": six 1988 Yugo automobiles, valued at more than $24,000. As one of a half-dozen semi-finalists, Rodriquez chose the correct key to start a Yugo--and thus won all six cars--in a drawing held at the College-area Wherehouse Records store.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were more than just the kings of the radio dial. They were more than just No. 1. They were Boss. More accurately, they were the Boss Jocks, spinning those Boss Hits for an adoring, young and huge Boss Radio audience in Boss Angeles. Even some of their names had more than a hint of Bossness to them--the Real Don Steele, Humble Harve, Dave Diamond, Sam Riddle, Walt Baby Love, Charlie Tuna. Back then, the Beatles were fighting for chart space with the Mamas & the Papas and Dylan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Jimmy O'Neill, an Oklahoman barely out of his teens when he became Los Angeles' top-rated radio deejay and only 24 when he catapulted to national celebrity as the host of "Shindig!," one of the earliest rock 'n' roll shows on prime-time television, died Friday at his West Hollywood home. He was 73. He had diabetes and heart problems, said his son, James O'Neill. In 1959, O'Neill made radio history as the first voice heard on KRLA-AM (1110) when it dropped its country-western format for rock music.
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