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BUSINESS
October 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
The radio industry has agreed to pay $1.7 billion over six years to a group that doles out royalties to songwriters under an agreement under which stations will now pay a set fee for music, rather than a percentage of yearly revenue. The agreement is the largest single licensing deal in the history of U.S. radio, according to the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, which represents more than 190,000 songwriters and publishers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Dial Global, the New York-based radio programming company, has changed its name to WestwoodOne, reviving the better-known brand. WestwoodOne, which Dial Global bought in 2011 , was one of the most recognizable names in the radio industry for decades. However, after the acquisition the name was dropped in favor of Dial Global. By returning to the WestwoodOne name, the company is trying to tap into a brand that already has  strong awareness among advertisers and consumers, said Paul Caine, Dial Global's chief executive. “It seemed like a very simple solution to gain awareness and recognition by the broader market,” he said.  PHOTOS: 2012 highest-paid media executives WestwoodOne will continue to carry events including NFL games, the Olympic Games and the  Grammy Awards to local radio stations around the country.
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BUSINESS
October 21, 2002 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Suffering from poor sales, major record labels continue to slash the payments they make to a coterie of middlemen hired to push songs to radio programmers, leaving Clear Channel Communications Inc. and other broadcasters trying to figure out where to go from here in the murky business of record promotion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Clear Channel Media & Entertainment has signed an agreement with the veteran band Fleetwood Mac to share performance royalties from songs played on the radio, the company said Wednesday. The agreement to let the performers collect revenue from plays on Clear Channel's broadcast and digital stations is the first to be negotiated directly with an artist, the company said.  “Reaching an agreement with them is the clearest sign yet that this kind of revenue-sharing model represents the industry's future," Bob Pittman, Clear Channel's chief executive officer, said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some attribute it to a widespread decline in radio standards, others to creativity gone awry, a prank carried too far. Still others trace the motivation to plain old greed. These are some of the reactions that radio industry officials have had to the revelation of an on-air murder-confession hoax concocted for publicity by three KROQ-FM (106.7) disc jockeys--morning personalities Kevin Ryder and Gene (Bean) Baxter and late-night host Doug Roberts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2005 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Radio is testing anew the theory that there is no such thing as bad publicity. The industry had better hope so, because for the past couple years, media coverage of it has been filled with about as much good cheer as Asian bird flu. The grim mood swirling around radio intensified earlier this week when a new payola scandal hit. Although a $10-million settlement was reached between Sony BMG, the nation's second-largest music company, and New York Atty. Gen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1998
The Museum of Television & Radio will host a seminar on Southern California's growing Spanish-language radio industry on April 29. Panelists expected to participate in the 90-minute forum include Richard Heftel, general manager of Los Angeles' two top-ranked radio stations; Pepe Barreto, host of KLVE-FM's (107.5) morning show; and Leo Ramos, vice president of regional sales for Caballero Spanish Media. Tickets are $8 for museum members, $10 for nonmembers. Information: (310) 786-1091.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990
As a black woman in the radio industry, I was disappointed by the omission of minority and female radio talent in Claudia Puig's April 22 article "Gee, the Voice Is Familiar." A informal poll of deejays at KGFJ reveals there are several female and minority personalities--LaRita Shelby, Licia Shearer and J.L/Jorge Martinez--who are successfully balancing TV and radio careers. Despite Puig's uneven reporting, women and minorities are participants in the American experience and the TV-radio boom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1993 | SUSAN KING, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
New Format: Only five days after announcing that Viacom would be buying the station from Westwood One, KQLZ-FM (100.3) dropped its hard-rock format at 3 p.m. Friday in favor of what's known in the radio industry as easy listening music. So Guns N' Roses and the Cure have given way to the likes of James Taylor and Gloria Estefan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
This post has been updated. See below for details. KDAY-FM (93.5), the Redondo Beach-based radio station that has been a bastion of R&B, hip-hop and urban contemporary music, is reportedly being sold and likely will flip to a Chinese on-air format in coming months. According to a website that covers the radio industry , Magic Broadcasting has agreed to sell KDAY and KDEY-FM (Ontario/Riverside) to RBC Communications in a deal worth nearly $20 million. If the sale goes through, the website radioinsight.com reported, it's likely that the station would switch to a Mandarin-language format in coming months.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
This post has been updated. See below for details. KDAY-FM (93.5), the Redondo Beach-based radio station that has been a bastion of R&B, hip-hop and urban contemporary music, is reportedly being sold and likely will flip to a Chinese on-air format in coming months. According to a website that covers the radio industry , Magic Broadcasting has agreed to sell KDAY and KDEY-FM (Ontario/Riverside) to RBC Communications in a deal worth nearly $20 million. If the sale goes through, the website radioinsight.com reported, it's likely that the station would switch to a Mandarin-language format in coming months.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before topping Felix Baumgartner's jump. The Skinny: I don't want instant replay in baseball. Just putting that out there since a lot of fans are now screaming for it after a blown call in Sunday's Yankee-Tiger game. Monday's headlines include a box office recap, a profile of Clear Channel chief Bob Pittman and a look at NPR's "Morning Edition. " Daily Dose: Ben Affleck's "Argo" has a great soundtrack. There's only one problem. The Rolling Stones song "Little T&A" wasn't technically released at the time his thriller about the rescue of six Americans from Iran in the midst of the hostage crisis takes place.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Alex Pham
House lawmakers on Friday introduced a bill aimed at lowering the fees paid by Pandora Media and other Internet radio streaming services. The bill proposes to change the way the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board calculates how much money Internet radio services must pay music labels and artists. Pandora has actively lobbied Congress to make the change, arguing that the current method is unfair because it charges Internet radio services disproportionately more than similar services provided by cable operators and satellite radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The recording industry's top lobbyist gave a thumbs up to radio giant Clear Channel Media's unprecedented deal with country music label Big Machine (Taylor Swift, Tim McGraw) that will pay performers royalties when their songs are played on the radio. "We're obviously delighted that the biggest radio group acknowledged that something should be done," said Cary Sherman, chairman and CEO of the Recording Industry Assn. of America .  Sherman made his remarks at a congressional hearing called "The Future of Audio" held Wednesday by the House Subcommittee on Communications and Technology  The music industry and radio broadcasters have fought for almost a century over paying artists royalties when their songs are played.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Like Levi Strauss, who got rich selling goods to immigrants during the Gold Rush, the founders of Triton Digital are making their fortune by providing the technology to radio companies wanting to mine digital gold. Neal Schore and Mike Agovino, two old-school radio executives and onetime competitors, launched their Sherman Oaks company in 2006 to give traditional radio stations and webcasters a way to distribute their content online and on mobile devices. The partners also devised a way for these companies to make money by automatically inserting ads into radio programs and measuring audience engagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Lewis is a Times staff writer.
There was punk aplenty at Saturday's opening show of KROQ-FM's two-night Almost Acoustic Christmas bill at Gibson Amphitheatre. The lineup was dominated by the 200 mph music, from headliner the Offspring down through Chicago's Rise Against and Southern California's own AFI and Slightly Stoopid.
NEWS
January 3, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bimbos' nightclub in San Francisco was packed as soul singer D'Angelo took the stage. The New York entertainer's debut single, "Brown Sugar," was already a hit on the East Coast. But his record company, EMI Music, was having trouble getting the song played on pop radio in California. By the time D'Angelo launched into "Brown Sugar" one night last summer, Bimbos was swarming with dozens of West Coast radio programmers--all of whom had been flown in with their dates at EMI's expense.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Corporate consolidation of radio companies has drastically reduced the local flavor, diversity and competitiveness of commercial radio, according to a report released today by a nonprofit advocacy group called the Future of Music Coalition. The coalition blames poorly conceived congressional legislation, which was supposed to promote localism and choice but instead eroded it by paving the way for consolidation.
OPINION
June 26, 2008
More than 100 years ago, Congress gave composers the right to demand royalties from those who played or sang their musical works in public. That 1897 law would later help songwriters (along with their publishers) collect a percentage of the revenue from radio stations that broadcast their tunes over the air. But when the radio industry was developing early in the 20th century, there was no copyright protection for the sound-recording business that was emerging around the same time.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Every day was Christmas for Michael Clark, but now the holiday's over. From the attic of his condo in Woodbridge, Va., the 38-year-old Web developer ran an Internet radio station that spun his beloved Christmas carols all year long. Then in March, a panel of federal judges sharply increased the royalty charges for playing music online. Since then, it's been one long, silent night for Clark and his hundreds of listeners at christmasmusic247.com.
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