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BUSINESS
February 22, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Oddball products ranging from spray-on hair to Ginsu knives have sold like hotcakes in the often murky but wildly successful world of TV infomercials. Now the marketers that brought infomercials to TV are dialing up a new medium: radio. An onslaught of radio infomercials--slick, 30-minute ads that often sound more like talk shows or game shows--may soon bring products like the Thighmaster exercise kit to your AM dial.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Oddball products ranging from spray-on hair to Ginsu knives have sold like hotcakes in the often murky but wildly successful world of TV infomercials. Now the marketers that brought infomercials to TV are dialing up a new medium: radio. An onslaught of radio infomercials--slick, 30-minute ads that often sound more like talk shows or game shows--may soon bring products like the Thighmaster exercise kit to your AM dial.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Feeling the sting from falling corporate and public contributions, National Public Radio has cut back its hourly newscasts by 25%. The decision to reduce the programs from 24 per day to 18 was quickly implemented: Top management told affiliated stations about the cuts April 23, and they went into effect Sunday night. "It just became financially impossible" to do the newscasts, said NPR spokeswoman Mary Morgan. The turnaround was so fast that some programmers didn't even know about it.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Layoffs at CBS Radio: CBS Radio Networks has fired 14% of its staff in response to the weak advertising market, a spokeswoman said. Helene Blieberg said the decision eliminated 22 jobs in programming, sales, marketing and research; neither news staff nor on-air personnel were affected. Blieberg said advertising sales have been down 20% each month this year. In addition, CBS Radio pays a high price for the rights to broadcast major sports events, further squeezing the network, she said.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Layoffs at CBS Radio: CBS Radio Networks has fired 14% of its staff in response to the weak advertising market, a spokeswoman said. Helene Blieberg said the decision eliminated 22 jobs in programming, sales, marketing and research; neither news staff nor on-air personnel were affected. Blieberg said advertising sales have been down 20% each month this year. In addition, CBS Radio pays a high price for the rights to broadcast major sports events, further squeezing the network, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"CALNET," the acclaimed California public-radio news program patterned roughly after "All Things Considered," is scrambling for money to stay afloat. Rumors have abounded since last spring that "CALNET," which debuted in December, 1988, might go off the air because of funding difficulties. Over the past six months, the full-time news staff has dwindled from six to one (based in Sacramento), with the majority of stories now compiled by free-lance reporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"CALNET," the acclaimed California public-radio news program patterned roughly after "All Things Considered," is scrambling for money to stay afloat. Rumors have abounded since last spring that "CALNET," which debuted in December, 1988, might go off the air because of funding difficulties. Over the past six months, the full-time news staff has dwindled from six to one (based in Sacramento), with the majority of stories now compiled by free-lance reporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Feeling the sting from falling corporate and public contributions, National Public Radio has cut back its hourly newscasts by 25%. The decision to reduce the programs from 24 per day to 18 was quickly implemented: Top management told affiliated stations about the cuts April 23, and they went into effect Sunday night. "It just became financially impossible" to do the newscasts, said NPR spokeswoman Mary Morgan. The turnaround was so fast that some programmers didn't even know about it.
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