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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, when the entire staff of rebel rocker KMET-FM was summarily dismissed, Joe Benson, a colleague at rival rock station KLOS-FM, extended the fired deejays a sentimental--and unusual--offer: to appear on his show and say goodby to their audience. Tuesday night, KLSX-FM's Jim Ladd, one of those fired KMET deejays, returned the favor: He played host during his KLSX-FM (97.1) show to fired KLOS deejays Benson and Bob Coburn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2001 | SEAN MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is Los Angeles the public radio capital of the nation? And if not, will it be one day? Anyone who seeks out local and national public (that is, noncommercial) radio programs such as "This American Life," "A Prairie Home Companion" and "Le Show") realizes that we have five major public stations on the FM dial in Southern California. Most big cities have only one or two. (New York has four.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No. 2 is actually No. 1, and No. 1 is really No. 3. Move No. 3 to No. 4, take No. 4 off the Top 12, and bring up No. 5 to the No. 2 spot. Confused? Those are part of the maneuvers radio executives and advertisers go through every three months to determine the real meaning behind the Arbitron ratings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2000 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sports junkies looking for a fix will be able to find it 24 hours a day at KRLA-AM (1110) starting Dec. 1, while fans of the station's current talk-radio format will have to hunt elsewhere on the dial for their favorite shows. The change was put in motion by Viacom's decision to sell the station to the Walt Disney Co., which--while awaiting federal approval of the deal--will begin managing the operation at the beginning of the month. When it does take over Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A radio format that was once dismissed as being too ethnic to achieve widespread popularity is now No. 1 in Washington, D.C, Chicago, Detroit and Atlanta and is in the top five in New York, Boston, Dallas and Miami. The radio format known as "urban contemporary," which plays primarily black artists and encompasses rhythm and blues at one end of the spectrum and rap at the other, is taking the industry by storm, marked by the proliferation of new stations and dramatic ratings success.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
KPWR-FM(105.9) is still ruling the airwaves as it has for the past two years, according to the latest quarterly audience survey, released Tuesday by Arbitron Ratings Service. And Jay Thomas, morning drive-time deejay for the station that calls itself "Power 106," has overtaken Rick Dees of rival KIIS-FM (102.7) as the Los Angeles area's top-rated morning personality. Overall, KIIS slipped from No. 2 to No. 4 in the ratings, slightly above the newest rock station, KQLZ-FM "Pirate Radio" (100.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were more than just the kings of the radio dial. They were more than just No. 1. They were Boss. More accurately, they were the Boss Jocks, spinning those Boss Hits for an adoring, young and huge Boss Radio audience in Boss Angeles. Even some of their names had more than a hint of Bossness to them--the Real Don Steele, Humble Harve, Dave Diamond, Sam Riddle, Walt Baby Love, Charlie Tuna. Back then, the Beatles were fighting for chart space with the Mamas & the Papas and Dylan.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1993 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1980s never ended at Infinity Broadcasting. The New York-based radio station group owner, best known as the company that produces and distributes the raunchy Howard Stern show, earlier this week agreed to pay $110 million for KRTH-FM in Los Angeles, the highest price ever for a radio station. Paying top dollar is nothing unusual for Infinity, a company that is gobbling up stations in a drive to become the largest radio group broadcaster in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 27 years on the graveyard shift, KABC-AM's Ray Briem says he'll miss the political patter and the crusades he conducted on the air, but he's ready to give it all up for a good night's sleep. "I'm 65 and my body says staying up all night ain't the right thing to do," said Briem, whose midnight-to-5 a.m. talk show on KABC (790) is one of the longest-running in the market. "You never get used to it. Your biological clock, your circadian rhythms are always upset.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer. and
Flip across the radio dial on any weekday morning and you'll be treated to the wacky antics of KLOS' Mark and Brian, the controversial rantings of KLSX "shock jock" Howard Stern, the boyish pranks of KIIS' Rick Dees, the easygoing banter of KABC's Ken and Barkley, the goofiness of KTNQ's Humberto Luna. What you won't hear in any substantial capacity are female voices.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Cox Radio Inc. said it agreed to sell its two remaining Los Angeles radio stations, KACE-FM and KRTO-FM, to Hispanic Broadcasting Corp. for $75 million in cash. Atlanta-based Cox Radio said it will sell the two stations to Dallas-based Hispanic Broadcasting, the largest Spanish-language radio broadcaster in the U.S., ending Cox's 25 years in Los Angeles. The sale is expected to close in the fourth quarter.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If it ain't broke, why fix it? Though ratings at KKBT-FM (92.3) have slipped in recent months, it was nothing that led most in the radio and music business to expect the drastic changes that are being made at the hip-hop/R&B station. John Madison, the Beat's acting general manager and senior vice president of regional operations for the station's parent company, AMFM Inc., has an explanation prepared. In fact, he has it written on a piece of paper, ready to show anyone who wants to know.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of Spanish-language music stations remained atop the radio ratings for the Los Angeles-Orange County market during the first three months of 1999, Arbitron reported Thursday, but both suffered a substantial loss of audience share while many English-language music stations were climbing. Mexican regional music station KSCA-FM retained its No. 1 status but lost 13% of its share of the audience 12 and over for an average day between 6 a.m. and midnight. KLVE-FM (107.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spin quickly across the radio dial in Miami and you can't help but feel disoriented. In close order you'll come across big band sounds, rap music, Caribbean rhythms, salsa, merengue, country-western and a string of fast-talking Spanish-speaking commentators hurling insults across the straits at Fidel Castro. One station has grown so confused, it simply lists its format as "miscellaneous." Yet a radio tower of Babel makes sense for Miami, one of the nation's most heterogenous cities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Listen closely just before talk-jock Don Imus takes the air the morning of Nov. 30 on KRLA-AM (1110). You'll hear the sound of an era breathing its last gasp. With the station's shift to a full-time talk and sports lineup, it will mark the last of rock 'n' roll and rhythm & blues on the AM dial in the Los Angeles area.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1997 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marking a two-year sweep of the local radio ratings, Spanish-language adult contemporary music station KLVE-FM (107.5) beat the competition in the summer season, Arbitron reported Tuesday. KSCA-FM (101.9), a newcomer to the Spanish field with Mexican regional music, continued to hold third place in only its second quarter. KLVE took a 6% share of the market in the three-month period covering June 26 to Sept. 17, among listeners 12 years and older in Los Angeles and Orange counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1992 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If not the king of all media, as he proclaims, Howard Stern has proven that he is at least the king of morning radio in the Los Angeles market, according to the latest Arbitron ratings survey released Tuesday. Scarcely more than a year after he debuted here, the New York-based Stern made good on his promise to become the top-rated morning personality, and in so doing became the first person ever to be No. 1 simultaneously in the nation's two largest radio markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2000 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sports junkies looking for a fix will be able to find it 24 hours a day at KRLA-AM (1110) starting Dec. 1, while fans of the station's current talk-radio format will have to hunt elsewhere on the dial for their favorite shows. The change was put in motion by Viacom's decision to sell the station to the Walt Disney Co., which--while awaiting federal approval of the deal--will begin managing the operation at the beginning of the month. When it does take over Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1997 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last month's high-profile switch by KSCA-FM (101.9) from English-language pop to Spanish-language music brought home to a lot of listeners the phenomenon of the Southland's rapidly changing radio market. Suddenly, you could tune in to 17 Spanish outlets out of 82 stations in Los Angeles and Orange counties--the largest and fastest growing Spanish radio market in the nation. Forty years ago, there was one full-time Spanish-language station here, KWKW-AM (1330).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third quarter in a row, Spanish-language music station KLVE-FM (107.5) hit the top of the Arbitron ratings charts Friday, followed by hip-hop outlet KPWR-FM (105.9). KLVE averaged a 7.2% share of the Los Angeles and Orange counties listening audience, 12 years and older, for the spring quarter (March 28-June 19), up a sliver by one-tenth of a point from the winter period. KPWR increased its share from 5% to 5.4% and led in the cumulative, or "cume," audience rankings.
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