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June 15, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
CLEARER RECEPTION: Voice of America, which just a few years ago was being jammed in Moscow, has begun broadcasting on a Moscow medium-wave station called "Open Radio" in prime time. The two-hour broadcasts reach 15 million people and include such features as how to start a business.
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NEWS
June 15, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
CLEARER RECEPTION: Voice of America, which just a few years ago was being jammed in Moscow, has begun broadcasting on a Moscow medium-wave station called "Open Radio" in prime time. The two-hour broadcasts reach 15 million people and include such features as how to start a business.
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NEWS
August 29, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin granted permission Wednesday for Radio Liberty and Radio Free Europe, the U.S. government's Cold War-era shortwave radio service, to open their first accredited bureau in Moscow and perhaps even be carried on AM or FM bands.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, putting some final touches on the post-Soviet order, took over state radio and television Friday, slashed the powers of his vice president and commandeered Mikhail S. Gorbachev's Kremlin office with such speed that the former Soviet leader had to go someplace else to work. But even as Yeltsin solidified his rule, there were signs of alarming fissures in the new Commonwealth of Independent States. Its acting military commander, Air Marshal Yevgeny I.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, putting some final touches on the post-Soviet order, took over state radio and television Friday, slashed the powers of his vice president and commandeered Mikhail S. Gorbachev's Kremlin office with such speed that the former Soviet leader had to go someplace else to work. But even as Yeltsin solidified his rule, there were signs of alarming fissures in the new Commonwealth of Independent States. Its acting military commander, Air Marshal Yevgeny I.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin granted permission Wednesday for Radio Liberty and Radio Free Europe, the U.S. government's Cold War-era shortwave radio service, to open their first accredited bureau in Moscow and perhaps even be carried on AM or FM bands.
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