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Radio Industry Southern California

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1996 | Judith Michaelson, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
Mornings you can hear Bill Handel on KFI-AM, decrying the notion "that somehow illegal aliens should have the benefits of education and health care, and the right to work in this state. . . . 'Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme'--and you pay for it. That's right, America, you pay for these Mexicans and Hondurans and El Salvadorans and Guatemalans who come up over the border."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1996 | Judith Michaelson, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
Mornings you can hear Bill Handel on KFI-AM, decrying the notion "that somehow illegal aliens should have the benefits of education and health care, and the right to work in this state. . . . 'Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme'--and you pay for it. That's right, America, you pay for these Mexicans and Hondurans and El Salvadorans and Guatemalans who come up over the border."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The traditional sound of Nortena music fills the airwaves as a voice introduces "Tres Hombres Sin Fronteras" (Three Men Without Borders) , a Spanish-language radio drama "about love, adventure and carelessness." The program is a radio novela , a soap-opera - like format popular in Latin America, but this one has a purpose beyond simply entertaining its listeners.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | ROY RIVENBURG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A North Hollywood man, buried chest-deep in a barrel of ice, lets KLOS-FM's Mark and Brian shave his head and replace his hair with Silly String. He pockets a pair of Super Bowl tickets for his trouble. In Houston, a radio audience eavesdrops as one woman confesses to another that she is sexually attracted to her. In San Diego, two disc jockeys dial a restaurant pay phone and find a man willing to smash his car windshield for $50.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | ROY RIVENBURG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A North Hollywood man, buried chest-deep in a barrel of ice, lets KLOS-FM's Mark and Brian shave his head and replace his hair with Silly String. He pockets a pair of Super Bowl tickets for his trouble. In Houston, a radio audience eavesdrops as one woman confesses to another that she is sexually attracted to her. In San Diego, two disc jockeys dial a restaurant pay phone and find a man willing to smash his car windshield for $50.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guns N' Roses' twin "Use Your Illusion" albums are perhaps the most popular and visible rock albums in recent years. They're also full of language that many would find offensive: Eight of the albums' 30 songs contain a four-letter slang term for sexual intercourse or some variation thereof, while two others carry a four-letter synonym for excrement. That means a full 33% of the most talked-about releases today can't be played on the radio. Or can they?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG
KOST-FM (103.5) continued to reign supreme over the radio airwaves last summer, the Arbitron ratings service reported Tuesday, while top-ranked morning duo Mark and Brian of KLOS-FM (95.5) demonstrated that radio success does not necessarily translate to television. KLOS' Mark Thompson and Brian Phelps finished No. 1 in the competitive morning drive-time period for the sixth consecutive three-month ratings period. They increased their share of the audience to nearly 9%, up from 7.5%.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crystal clear sound that has made compact discs one of the fastest-selling consumer items is coming to cable this summer as three companies launch digital radio services aimed at duplicating the success of Home Box Office, MTV and other cable programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no business like show business, syndicated radio producer Ron Cutler kept telling himself. So wouldn't it be loverly for people to have a radio station they could turn to and hear only tunes from their favorite Broadway and movie musicals? Rather than look somewhere over the rainbow to realize his idea, Cutler turned to one of his favorite cities: Santa Barbara.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guns N' Roses' twin "Use Your Illusion" albums are perhaps the most popular and visible rock albums in recent years. They're also full of language that many would find offensive: Eight of the albums' 30 songs contain a four-letter slang term for sexual intercourse or some variation thereof, while two others carry a four-letter synonym for excrement. That means a full 33% of the most talked-about releases today can't be played on the radio. Or can they?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG
KOST-FM (103.5) continued to reign supreme over the radio airwaves last summer, the Arbitron ratings service reported Tuesday, while top-ranked morning duo Mark and Brian of KLOS-FM (95.5) demonstrated that radio success does not necessarily translate to television. KLOS' Mark Thompson and Brian Phelps finished No. 1 in the competitive morning drive-time period for the sixth consecutive three-month ratings period. They increased their share of the audience to nearly 9%, up from 7.5%.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no business like show business, syndicated radio producer Ron Cutler kept telling himself. So wouldn't it be loverly for people to have a radio station they could turn to and hear only tunes from their favorite Broadway and movie musicals? Rather than look somewhere over the rainbow to realize his idea, Cutler turned to one of his favorite cities: Santa Barbara.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crystal clear sound that has made compact discs one of the fastest-selling consumer items is coming to cable this summer as three companies launch digital radio services aimed at duplicating the success of Home Box Office, MTV and other cable programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The traditional sound of Nortena music fills the airwaves as a voice introduces "Tres Hombres Sin Fronteras" (Three Men Without Borders) , a Spanish-language radio drama "about love, adventure and carelessness." The program is a radio novela , a soap-opera - like format popular in Latin America, but this one has a purpose beyond simply entertaining its listeners.
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