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BUSINESS
February 7, 1993 | JAMES BATES and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like his high-profile record career, Jerry Rubinstein's business ventures have amounted to an endless search for hits. United Artists records was one early chart topper. Rubinstein and his partners bought and sold the company for a tidy profit in the 1970s. Then there was Bel-Air Savings, a small thrift he and some major Hollywood players sold with what, in hindsight, was perfect timing in 1987, just before the S&L industry unraveled. But with the hits have come some misses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2001 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer
"From Minnesota Public Radio--from Los Angeles, this is 'Marketplace.' " For more than a year now, listeners of several local public radio stations, along with listeners across the nation, have heard this curious opening. The unlikely geographical aggregate--from Minnesota ... from Los Angeles--glances quickly off the ears of those tuning in to the distinctive half-hour business magazine aired daily on KCRW and KPCC (see box, Page 71) and once carried on KUSC, where it originated, for 10 years.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Federal Communications Commission, seeking to bolster the ailing radio industry, voted Thursday to let financially successful broadcast owners buy more radio stations. The FCC will now allow one company to own 30 AM and 30 FM stations nationwide, instead of 12 AM and 12 FM stations, with only one of each in a single community. A company will be able to buy from three to six stations in a single market, depending on the size of the community.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most influential radio program directors in the Spanish music business is expected to plead guilty today to a payola-related tax offense, his attorney confirmed, as part of a continuing Justice Department probe into record promotion. Salvador Homero Campos accepted more than $200,000 in kickbacks to air songs on a dozen Spanish-language music stations across California and the U.S. from 1995 to 1997, law enforcement sources said.
NEWS
July 19, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
The news literally fell out of the blue, landing on furniture company executive John Blackwelder and his wife as they watched television on a warm summer's evening in Charlotte, N.C. A Washington lawyer named Thomas Root had been miraculously plucked from the Atlantic Ocean, the newscast said, after a bizarre six-hour airplane flight in which he slumped unconscious in his Cessna 210 while the automatic pilot carried him toward what seemed certain death.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
The Justice Department's top antitrust enforcer Wednesday said radio mergers that give one company more than 35% of a metropolitan area's market raise antitrust questions that may prompt scrutiny from the federal government. Though not a "hard-and-fast rule . . .
BUSINESS
June 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Senate approved a plan Friday that would immediately deregulate rates of small cable systems and eliminate restrictions on how many TV and radio stations one company can own. The plan, which was attached to the Senate's sweeping telecommunications reform bill, also includes provisions designed to protect cable customers from excessive rate increases. Passed on a 77-8 vote, the plan brings the measure more in line with a bill awaiting a vote in the House.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
The government's policy of fining TV and radio stations for violating decency standards is constitutional, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. However, the panel said it was troubled by the lengthy time it takes regulators to enforce the policy. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld a lower court ruling that the Federal Communications Commission's policy does not violate broadcasters' rights to free speech.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to pressure from consumers, small businesses and Congress, the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday scaled back plans to allow increased ownership of radio stations by individual companies. By a 5-0 vote, the commission increased ownership limits from their present level of 12 AM and 12 FM stations nationwide to 18 AM and 18 FM stations. In two years, the limits will increase to 20 AM and 20 FM stations.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not so long ago, phonograph records were dust-catching vinyl platters etched with grooves and radio DJs were hitmakers, beaming the latest albums to an eager audience. Record companies would do just about anything to get radio station turntables spinning with their wares. It was a two-step process: Hear it on the air, buy it for the home sound system. Broadcasters, awash in free promotional discs, focused on a certain market and lived off the advertising income. For decades, there was harmony.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2000 | KALPANA SRINIVASAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Federal regulators tweaked their plan to license hundreds of "microradio" stations Friday, adding safeguards to protect radio reading services for the blind from interference. But the Federal Communications Commission, in a late Friday afternoon announcement, largely ignored the complaints of commercial broadcasters that say low-power service will interfere with existing FM stations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an odd pairing of sound and image at the talk-radio conclave in Century City this weekend. Here was Mark Williams, vice president of the National Assn. of Radio Talk Show Hosts, in ponytail and earring, saying on Friday that "talk radio is becoming as diverse as music radio." While he meant diversity of format--such as a talk show in Tampa, Fla., devoted exclusively to the subject of cigars--another sort of diversity appeared to present the same old picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1997 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The message out of the opening sessions of the National Assn. of Radio Talk Show Hosts on Friday was that the medium of talk radio is changing--and for the better. It's moving away from harsh political, ideological talk, panelists for the most part agreed, and becoming more conversational, storytelling, people-oriented talk. Opening the formal meetings of the ninth annual convention at the Century Plaza, Mark Williams, vice president of the talk radio group and a radio host in Albany, N.Y.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
The Justice Department's top antitrust enforcer Wednesday said radio mergers that give one company more than 35% of a metropolitan area's market raise antitrust questions that may prompt scrutiny from the federal government. Though not a "hard-and-fast rule . . .
BUSINESS
October 14, 1995 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cyberspace may be sexier, the information highway more intriguing, but old-fashioned radio broadcasting is hot right now. Radio properties are selling like Picassos at an auction, fetching fantastic prices and driving up the shares of the companies that own them.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
The government's policy of fining TV and radio stations for violating decency standards is constitutional, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. However, the panel said it was troubled by the lengthy time it takes regulators to enforce the policy. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld a lower court ruling that the Federal Communications Commission's policy does not violate broadcasters' rights to free speech.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1990
Regarding the ton of ice in the June 3 News and Briefs, a 2,000-pound ice cube contains approximately 35 cubic feet. Doing some rough computations, I find that a one-ton ice cube is about three feet and three inches on a side. A meter. That is the "Fact." ALBERT P. PETRAITIS Escondido
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
People who want to watch steamy movies on broadcast TV or listen to racy talk shows will soon have to tune in after 10 p.m., a federal appeals court ruled Friday. The 7-4 decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia will mean tighter regulations for the TV and radio broadcasting industry. Under Federal Communications Commission rules, TV and radio stations may air indecent shows only between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though investors and other observers were quick to handicap winners and losers Friday a day after Senate passage of a telecom reform bill, veterans of the long struggle to overhaul the nation's 61-year-old communications laws say the die is not yet cast. For starters, there were so many amendments added in the waning hours of debate on the bill--more than 20--that many lobbyists, legislative aides and others said they are not even clear on all the details of the measure.
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