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January 19, 1987 | Associated Press
A new, clandestine radio station operated by Nicaraguan contras can be picked up by AM radios in Managua, the capital, and elsewhere in Nicaragua. The 50,000-watt Radio Liberacion, which went on the air last week, was designed to broadcast music, news, commentary, sports and other programs from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. It replaces the 15 de Septiembre station, which broadcast for about three years on a much weaker signal.
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NEWS
January 19, 1987 | Associated Press
A new, clandestine radio station operated by Nicaraguan contras can be picked up by AM radios in Managua, the capital, and elsewhere in Nicaragua. The 50,000-watt Radio Liberacion, which went on the air last week, was designed to broadcast music, news, commentary, sports and other programs from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. It replaces the 15 de Septiembre station, which broadcast for about three years on a much weaker signal.
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NEWS
April 3, 1989
U.S.-backed Contras will allow Nicaragua to look for missing people in their camps if the Sandinista government allows them to inspect its prisons, a rebel leader said. In a broadcast on rebel Radio Liberacion monitored in Managua, Col. Enrique Bermudez, Contra military chief, referred to a request by a Nicaraguan delegation to visit rebel camps in Honduras to look for missing people. "There must be reciprocity," he said.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan told Nicaraguan rebels in a broadcast on their clandestine radio station Monday night that the United States will keep backing them until the Sandinista government lives up to its promises under a regional peace plan. "Your struggle has and always will have our support because our goal is the same," the President said in an unprecedented broadcast over Radio Liberacion, which was monitored in Costa Rica.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | United Press International
U.S.-backed Contras are ready to release 66 Sandinista government prisoners of war, rebel military chief Enrique Bermudez said Friday. Bermudez, speaking on the Contras' clandestine Radio Liberacion, said the prisoners could be released "in any of the Central American countries." "We have no interest in holding young prisoners from the Sandinista army, captured during our armed struggle," Bermudez said.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
The Nicaraguan guerrillas, armed with a new supply of weapons purchased with U.S. aid, have recently made deep penetrations into Nicaragua, rebel leader Adolfo Calero said Wednesday at a press conference in Miami. He asserted that about 10,000 contras are in "positions of combat" against the Sandinista army, spread out in numerous offensives. "Our plan is to be . . .
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
In the first major move of the contras' stepped-up war, U.S.-backed rebels soon will launch a powerful clandestine radio broadcast to try to fuel public discontent with the Sandinistas and win popular support inside Nicaragua. The 50,000-watt broadcasting station, apparently the world's only AM guerrilla radio channel, is the contras' biggest effort yet in the political side of the war, which they have largely ignored until now.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Foreign Minister Ricardo Acevedo Peralta of El Salvador said Friday that a Reagan Administration plan to ask for $270 million in aid for the Nicaraguan contras is "a contradiction" of Central American peace efforts and that the contras should not receive more money before Nov. 7, the date a regional peace accord is scheduled to go into effect. If the United States were to disburse more aid now "it would kill the peace process," Acevedo said in an interview.
NEWS
December 23, 1987 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The army said Tuesday that it has retaken a remote northeastern mining region after a two-day rebel offensive. The Contras said their forces achieved their objectives and had moved on. The Sandinistas, meanwhile, protested what they called an "act of state terrorism" by the United States in supplying a missile reportedly used to hit a civilian plane Monday.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Television stations in El Salvador and Honduras are airing a CIA-produced videotape of Nicaraguan army defector Roger Miranda Bengoechea, in which he embraces the Contra cause and accuses Sandinista Defense Minister Humberto Ortega of philandering with the wives of his associates.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
A remote Honduran island in the Caribbean has reportedly become the main depot for a CIA-run military operation supplying rebels fighting to oust the Sandinista government of Nicaragua. Rebel sources and military observers, who asked that they not be further identified, said Americans are overseeing rebel supply operations on one of the Swan Islands, once a support base for the abortive CIA-backed invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs.
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