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WORLD
April 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Several websites of U.S.-funded Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty have been attacked, the broadcaster said, suggesting Belarus' government could be responsible. The continuing assault began Saturday by flooding servers with fake traffic to keep legitimate visitors from getting through, the network said in a statement. The attack is aimed mainly at the site of Radio Free Europe's Belarus service, but sites serving Iran, Russia, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Kosovo, Macedonia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia also have been affected, the network said.
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WORLD
April 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Several websites of U.S.-funded Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty have been attacked, the broadcaster said, suggesting Belarus' government could be responsible. The continuing assault began Saturday by flooding servers with fake traffic to keep legitimate visitors from getting through, the network said in a statement. The attack is aimed mainly at the site of Radio Free Europe's Belarus service, but sites serving Iran, Russia, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Kosovo, Macedonia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia also have been affected, the network said.
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NEWS
February 5, 1987
Moscow has stepped up its jamming of U.S.-funded Radio Liberty after ending its blocking of British Broadcasting Corp. transmissions to the Soviet Union, Radio Liberty President Gene Pell said. He reported that engineers at the station, based in Munich, West Germany, have determined that the Soviet Union is blocking Radio Liberty broadcasts with at least eight transmitters previously set aside for jamming BBC transmissions. "Jamming is illegal," Pell said.
OPINION
December 17, 2002
The United States has a good story about democracy, free markets, individual rights. U.S. embassies should be telling it loudly abroad, their voices amplified by U.S.-financed broadcasting operations like Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty. The way not to tell it is by surreptitiously putting foreign journalists on the CIA or the Defense Department payroll. That taints the information and imperils reputations and lives when the payoffs become known, as they eventually do.
NEWS
April 28, 1986 | Associated Press
Oleg Tumanov, who defected to the West more than 20 years ago and became a top editor at Radio Liberty, resurfaced in Moscow today to denounce the U.S.-financed station as a front for American spies and propaganda. Unlike other recent Soviet defectors whose return has been announced by state-run media in a blaze of publicity, Tumanov, 41, appeared nervous at his news conference, attended by hundreds of Soviet and Western reporters.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Officials of the U.S. government-operated Radio Liberty said Friday that the station has received a favorable review in the Soviet press for the first time since it began 35 years ago to broadcast news and commentary to the Soviet Union in defiance of Moscow's censors.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union has stopped jamming Radio Liberty broadcasts for the first time in 38 years, officials said today, as thousands of jamming transmitters blocking most Western broadcasts into the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe were silenced. Jane Lester, spokeswoman for Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty, said the service monitored all of its broadcasts overnight and found no jamming except for Radio Free Europe transmissions to Czechoslovakia and Bulgaria.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since it went on the air 35 years ago, Radio Liberty, originally a CIA-sponsored project to broadcast news to the Soviet Union in defiance of Moscow's censors, is getting through without jamming, the U.S. government announced Wednesday. U.S. officials said the halt in jamming probably was intended by Moscow as a good-will gesture before Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's meeting next week with President Reagan and President-elect George Bush.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Declaring that the Cold War is over and that Eastern Europe now enjoys a generally free press, an advisory commission Thursday urged the U.S. government to scrap Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, the services established four decades ago to challenge the Communist monopoly on information behind the Iron Curtain. The commission said the Voice of America should continue to operate and would be enough to spread the American message. Malcolm S. Forbes Jr.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin granted permission Wednesday for Radio Liberty and Radio Free Europe, the U.S. government's Cold War-era shortwave radio service, to open their first accredited bureau in Moscow and perhaps even be carried on AM or FM bands.
WORLD
October 5, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vladimir V. Putin on Friday unexpectedly revoked a decade-old decree guaranteeing U.S.-funded Radio Liberty the right to operate in Russia. The move followed months of Kremlin hints and complaints that the station was on thin ice with authorities due to its coverage of the war in the separatist republic of Chechnya and its recent launch of a Chechen-language service.
NEWS
November 14, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the global war against terrorism, a skirmish is being fought on the streets of this charming old capital, where armored personnel carriers have been strategically placed to protect Radio Free Europe against truck bombs. The station, formally called Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, has been considered a potential target since 1998, when it began broadcasting an Iraqi service aimed at undermining the regime of President Saddam Hussein. But after the Sept.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last month, Russian authorities arrested journalist Andrei Babitsky, who had angered the military with his fearless reports on the Chechen war for U.S.-funded Radio Liberty. Then, in early February, they announced that they had handed him over to Chechen fighters, washing their hands of him and warning that they would not be responsible for his safety. Now it seems they want him after all.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrei Babitsky, a correspondent for U.S.-funded Radio Liberty who was feared dead after disappearing in Russian-controlled territory in Chechnya, turned up alive and well in southern Russia, his wife said Friday. Babitsky, a Russian citizen who angered authorities with his coverage of the Chechen war, had been missing since mid-January.
NEWS
February 10, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case of a missing Russian correspondent for U.S.-funded Radio Liberty, which has called into question the accountability of this country's new government, took new twists Wednesday as a video surfaced purporting to show the reporter alive as recently as Sunday. The videotape, sold late Tuesday to Radio Liberty by unidentified men in a Mercedes-Benz, shows a close-up of Andrei Babitsky talking unsteadily into the camera and saying the date is Feb.
NEWS
February 5, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian government released a video Friday purporting to show its transfer of detained Radio Liberty correspondent Andrei Babitsky to Chechen rebels, but the tape only raised new questions about the unorthodox hand-over. The heavily edited videotape shows Babitsky, a Russian citizen employed by the U.S. government-funded radio network, being marched down a country road by armed Russian soldiers and handed over to another armed man wearing camouflage clothing and a mask.
OPINION
April 11, 1993
Radio Liberty and Radio Free Europe, which for more than 40 years have broadcast news and entertainment to the states of the former Soviet Union and to Eastern Europe, are in danger of being silenced as part of President Clinton's budget-cutting plans.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, hoping to reap a modest peace dividend from the end of the Cold War by closing down Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, has encountered surprising resistance from a task force it established to study the idea. In a report to the White House, the 11-member Presidential Task Force on Government International Radio Broadcasting has recommended not only continuing the two services indefinitely but creating a third aimed at China and other Asian Communist nations.
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A correspondent for U.S.-funded Radio Liberty who was arrested while covering the war in Chechnya was handed over to Chechen rebels Thursday in exchange for three Russian soldiers, the Kremlin announced. Sergei V. Yastrzhembsky, the government's chief spokesman on the Chechen war, said veteran journalist Andrei Babitsky had been given to Islamic separatists despite earlier reports that he would be released and flown to Moscow.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | From Reuters
Russia said Friday that it had detained a journalist working for the U.S.-funded Radio Liberty in Chechnya but that he might be released in a few days. Interior Ministry spokesman Oleg Aksyonov said Andrei Babitsky was being held at a jail in the breakaway region because "he lacked proper documents and because of information he allegedly spent time with illegal armed groups." "After some necessary formalities he may be released. . . .
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