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Radio Marti

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1985
Radio Marti si; L.A. Times no! ANTONIO J. FERNANDEZ Pasadena
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NATIONAL
December 24, 2006 | Andrew Zajac, Chicago Tribune
A $530-million, 20-year federal government venture to broadcast American values in Cuba has yielded a minuscule audience, no measurable impact and strong suggestions of cronyism for a politically potent South Florida constituency. Funding for Radio and TV Marti has grown to $37 million a year, even though a nine-member advisory board set up to guide the U.S. broadcasting effort has not met in eight years.
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NEWS
March 14, 1985 | United Press International
President Reagan will nominate Midge Decter, an author and editor, to the Advisory Board for Radio Broadcasting to Cuba, which will oversee Radio Marti, the White House said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
Re "A Moldy Cuba-Immigrant Policy" (editorial, Sept. 22), concerning Cuban versus Mexican immigration: Yes, the legal yearly limit accepted by the U.S. from Cuba is 20,000 people. However, this contrasts with 130,000 legally allowed to emigrate from Mexico last year alone. Yearly legal quotas apply to all countries, not just Cuba. Regarding illegal immigration from both countries, it is far easier to cross the Rio Grande than the Florida Straits. Thus, the occasional Cuban rafter does not compound the problems of America's overcrowded schools, highways, etc., as do the millions of illegal immigrants from Mexico and Central America.
NEWS
March 18, 1987 | From the Washington Post
Last June, Cubans tuning into Radio Marti, the new U.S. government station broadcasting to their island, heard an apparently spontaneous interview with President Reagan on U.S. policy toward the Fidel Castro regime. What the listeners did not know is that Radio Marti officials submitted their questions in advance to the White House, that those questions were changed in part by the National Security Council staff and that the White House also provided the script for Reagan's answers.
NEWS
November 7, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee is questioning whether Radio Marti, the controversial U.S. government radio station beamed at Cuba, illegally scooped private U.S. news media by broadcasting exclusive interviews with Cuban defectors under official protection. Rep. Dante B. Fascell (D-Fla.) says the government allowed Radio Marti--but not U.S. news outlets--to interview Gen. Rafael del Pino and Maj.
NEWS
March 4, 1992
Yale Newman, 68, a founder of Radio Marti and pioneer in international television news. He was ABC's London bureau chief from 1953 to 1963, formative years in television. He produced the network's series on Winston Churchill, "The Valiant Years," and won a Peabody Award for his coverage of the Adolf Eichmann trial in Jerusalem. Newman joined the Foreign Service in 1966, and served as spokesman for U.S. embassies in Argentina, Panama and Venezuela.
NEWS
June 18, 1985 | From Reuters
Frank Sinatra singing "Come Fly With Me" was heard on Cuba's state-run radio today for the first time in decades in an apparent concession to the challenge from recently launched, U.S.-based Radio Marti. The American singer and his songs were effectively banned here in the early 1960s because of his alleged friendship with gangsters who used to run much of downtown Havana in the years before Fidel Castro's revolution.
NEWS
November 20, 1986 | United Press International
A Radio Marti reporter who quizzed President Reagan at his news conference said today the U.S. government station yanked her off the White House beat and threatened to fire her because "the National Security Council didn't like my question." Cuban-born Annette Lopez-Munoz said she was told by one of her editors: " 'You're through as a White House correspondent. You are not to go to the White House. You're really in trouble. We're considering firing you.'
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Stories about AIDS carried by U.S.-run Radio Marti has led to the disclosure of a higher incidence of the disease in Cuba than the Castro regime has officially admitted, the radio's director said Tuesday. Ernesto Betancourt said that interviews with refugees also have revealed a growing fear among Cubans about AIDS exposure of troops serving in Africa over the past decade and that the Castro regime may be less willing now to take on further missions there.
NEWS
January 12, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Herminio San Roman, a politically connected Miami lawyer, was named director of the Office of Cuba Broadcasting nine months ago, his primary mission was to quell the enduring turmoil at Radio and TV Marti. For years, the U.S. government's efforts to beam pro-democracy programming to the Communist island just 90 miles south of Key West has been so riddled by staff dissension and low morale that some in Congress have wanted to pull the plug on the stations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1997
The death of Jorge Mas Canosa (Nov. 24) has led many to proudly credit him as being the single most important influence on U.S. policy toward Cuba. Mas Canosa and his Cuban American National Foundation were instrumental in the establishment of Radio and TV Marti, the passage of the Cuba Democracy Act in 1992 and passage of the Helms-Burton Act of 1996. Radio and TV Marti are multimillion-dollar money pits that beam anti-Castro messages to the island despite the fact that few Cubans listen to Radio Marti and no Cuban ever sees TV Marti because the Cuban government jams its frequency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1997
For more than a decade, Jorge Mas Canosa, a Cuban exile in Miami, has been the chairman of the federal advisory board for Radio Marti and TV Marti, which spend about $25 million a year in U.S. tax money to beam news and other programming to Cuba. The original aim of the stations was to provide an alternative to communist Cuba's broadcasting and newspapers, which operate under Havana's watchful eye. We have long been skeptical of Marti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1996
Since the mid-1980s, U.S. taxpayers have been spending up to $25 million a year on TV Marti, a station that virtually nobody watches, and Radio Marti, which broadcasts the same anti-Castro line that a number of private stations in Miami send out. Now the directors of both projects want to move the operations from Washington to Miami, which could cost a few more millions. Whatever the initial intentions, Marti has become largely irrelevant in the propaganda game.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since Radio Marti began beaming news and entertainment into communist Cuba 11 years ago, critics have called it little more than a taxpayer-funded voice for powerful Cuban exile groups to promote their own political agenda. Now several lawmakers and other critics fear that the credibility of the government's $25-million-a-year campaign will be further compromised when it relocates its headquarters from Washington to Miami, the heart of the Cuban American community. For two years the U.S.
NEWS
March 4, 1992
Yale Newman, 68, a founder of Radio Marti and pioneer in international television news. He was ABC's London bureau chief from 1953 to 1963, formative years in television. He produced the network's series on Winston Churchill, "The Valiant Years," and won a Peabody Award for his coverage of the Adolf Eichmann trial in Jerusalem. Newman joined the Foreign Service in 1966, and served as spokesman for U.S. embassies in Argentina, Panama and Venezuela.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cold War may be waning in Europe, but it is thriving closer to home. Later this month, the United States will begin using a communications balloon over the Florida Keys to bombard Cuba with TV Marti, the Caribbean television equivalent of Radio Free Europe. TV Marti, the only official U.S. television broadcast aimed exclusively at a foreign country, was authorized by Congress for a three-month test at a cost of $7.5 million. Cuban President Fidel Castro has promised to fire back. The U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Senate plan to spend $7.5 million for a television version of Radio Marti has run into heavy opposition from the National Assn. of Broadcasters, which fears a broadcast jamming retaliation from Fidel Castro's Cuba. The NAB board of directors demanded Friday that Congress compensate any U.S. TV or radio stations that are affected by Cuban interference brought on by the transmission of Television Marti.
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