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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
A Simi Valley disc jockey who has tried every other stunt he can think of to boost ratings at his tiny radio station said Monday that he has found a way to increase his audience by millions. The only hitch is that they speak Russian, and they are about 5,800 miles out of the range of the 1,000-watt transmitter at KWNK in Simi Valley and Arbitron rating monitors, according to veteran radio personality Dick Whittington.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1990
Pacific Telesis announced that it will lay off 11,000 employees during the '90s. Increased efficiency? Not true. Another sign of the Reagan legacy: greed. JOE STOPPELLI Redlands
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NEWS
June 10, 1985
The Soviets' Vega 1 spacecraft, bound for a rendezvous with Halley's Comet next March, launched a descent module that is to explore the planet Venus, Radio Moscow reported. A balloon probe will separate from the landing craft and float through the Venusian atmosphere, collecting information on its composition, the broadcast said. The module is expected to reach Venus on Tuesday, the radio said.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
The KGB, in an unusual appeal, warned today that Azerbaijan is "on the edge of the abyss," as extremists ambushed a military convoy also carrying women and children in the troubled republic, killing three. Hopes for an end to 10 days of ethnic strife between Armenia and Azerbaijan had surfaced Monday when Communist Party and government officials from the republics agreed to try to end the fighting. But Radio Moscow reported today that the situation in Baku remains "very, very tense."
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
The KGB, in an unusual appeal, warned today that Azerbaijan is "on the edge of the abyss," as extremists ambushed a military convoy also carrying women and children in the troubled republic, killing three. Hopes for an end to 10 days of ethnic strife between Armenia and Azerbaijan had surfaced Monday when Communist Party and government officials from the republics agreed to try to end the fighting. But Radio Moscow reported today that the situation in Baku remains "very, very tense."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
It's hard to be enemies when you're trying so hard to be friends. That reality of human nature has fueled the biggest success and the biggest failure of the first five installments of "Calling Moscow." The monthly call-in radio show lets American listeners chat with a panel of Soviet citizens in a Moscow studio about life in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz cut short a planned day of preparation for climactic arms control talks Wednesday and took an overnight train to Moscow because fog closed down the Soviet capital's three airports for a third day.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Americans from around the country chatted away with Muscovites on Friday's premiere of "Calling Moscow," a new radio satellite phone-in program linking the U.S.A. to the U.S.S.R. and produced by KPBS-FM (89.5) in San Diego. They called from Ohio, from Minnesota, from Tennessee, Kentucky and California. A man in Montreal even dialed up.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
It was clear in the first 10 minutes that this was going to be a meeting unlike any ever held behind the Kremlin's walls. As the first speaker read a traditional statement of congratulations Thursday to the newly elected members of the Congress of People's Deputies, an unidentified deputy strode to the front of the hall and seized the microphone. Standing beneath a 20-foot-tall statue of the founder of the Soviet state, V. I. Lenin, he demanded a minute of silence in memory of 21 people killed by Red Army troops in a protest demonstration last month in the republic of Georgia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1990
Pacific Telesis announced that it will lay off 11,000 employees during the '90s. Increased efficiency? Not true. Another sign of the Reagan legacy: greed. JOE STOPPELLI Redlands
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
It was clear in the first 10 minutes that this was going to be a meeting unlike any ever held behind the Kremlin's walls. As the first speaker read a traditional statement of congratulations Thursday to the newly elected members of the Congress of People's Deputies, an unidentified deputy strode to the front of the hall and seized the microphone. Standing beneath a 20-foot-tall statue of the founder of the Soviet state, V. I. Lenin, he demanded a minute of silence in memory of 21 people killed by Red Army troops in a protest demonstration last month in the republic of Georgia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
It's hard to be enemies when you're trying so hard to be friends. That reality of human nature has fueled the biggest success and the biggest failure of the first five installments of "Calling Moscow." The monthly call-in radio show lets American listeners chat with a panel of Soviet citizens in a Moscow studio about life in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
August 1, 1988
The number of murders and assaults in Moscow has increased this year, but the number of all violent crimes in the city has decreased, according to Lt. Gen. P. S. Bogdanov, chief of Moscow's Administration of Internal Affairs. He said in an interview in the newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda that the city's juvenile crime rate has also increased.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Americans from around the country chatted away with Muscovites on Friday's premiere of "Calling Moscow," a new radio satellite phone-in program linking the U.S.A. to the U.S.S.R. and produced by KPBS-FM (89.5) in San Diego. They called from Ohio, from Minnesota, from Tennessee, Kentucky and California. A man in Montreal even dialed up.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz cut short a planned day of preparation for climactic arms control talks Wednesday and took an overnight train to Moscow because fog closed down the Soviet capital's three airports for a third day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
A Simi Valley disc jockey who has tried every other stunt he can think of to boost ratings at his tiny radio station said Monday that he has found a way to increase his audience by millions. The only hitch is that they speak Russian, and they are about 5,800 miles out of the range of the 1,000-watt transmitter at KWNK in Simi Valley and Arbitron rating monitors, according to veteran radio personality Dick Whittington.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Listeners to radio station KWNK (670) this summer will wake up to the sound of Radio Moscow, and wisecracking Simi Valley disc jockey Dick Whittington says he will regale Russia with the joys of greater Moorpark when he takes his four-hour morning show to Moscow in April. Soviet authorities have promised Whittington an interpreter and a hookup to state-run Radio Moscow.
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