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NEWS
December 10, 1994 | Associated Press
A Cuban radio news anchor asked for political asylum upon arriving to cover the Summit of the Americas, saying he could no longer tolerate the repression of his homeland. Carlos Santana Ojeda, who said he was the anchor of a daily economic news talk show called "Clearly Speaking," said Friday that he was unable to resist a "once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get out." He sought asylum upon arrival at Miami International Airport late Thursday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 19, 2009
It's an article of faith among newspaper journalists that our work is the foundation upon which television and radio news programs are built. After all, broadcasters don't spend nearly as much on reporting as their print competitors do. So you can imagine the tut-tutting in newsrooms last week when a memo surfaced from Ellen McDonnell, National Public Radio's director of morning programming, announcing that the company was canceling all of its newspaper subscriptions to save money. And why not?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1996
A radio news reporter for KPFK-FM in Studio City was shot to death execution-style in South-Central Los Angeles, Los Angeles Police Department homicide detectives said Monday. The body of Michael Taylor, 45, of Los Angeles was found last Tuesday in a vacant lot off South Victoria Avenue, said Detective Alex Moreno of the LAPD South bureau. Residents heard gun shots near the railroad tracks about 1:30 a.m. and called police, he said.
WORLD
January 19, 2008 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
For some Mexicans, it was as if a combination of Diane Sawyer and Christiane Amanpour had been summarily bounced from the airwaves. That's been the widespread reaction to the Jan. 4 decision by journalist Carmen Aristegui to end her prominent 5-year-old morning talk show on the capital's W Radio, due to what she described as growing editorial differences with the station's co-owners, Mexico's multimedia giant Grupo Televisa and Grupo Prisa, Spain's largest media conglomerate.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1993 | SARAH J. BALL, Ball, of Bolton, England, is a graduate of the University of York. She is studying for her master's degree in broadcast journalism at USC and produces and appears on "IMPACT," a USC Journalism School-sponsored weekly cable news magazine show
A recent article from London by William Tuohy ("Britons Are All Ears for Daily Newsmakers," World Report, Oct. 26) proclaimed that many British people still get their prime-time news from the radio. Why ever not? Just because America has become a tube-culture, the rest of the world has not--yet! As a journalist totally enchanted by the medium of radio, and one who has worked at the BBC, the fact that many people still tune in their sets is comforting but not at all surprising.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of limping along with depleted funds and a pared-down staff, "CALNET," the statewide public-radio news program patterned after "All Things Considered," has come to an end. It had its final broadcast Wednesday. "We were turned down by our last prospective funder (Wednesday) afternoon," said Rick Lewis, co-creator of "CALNET" and general manager of KLON-FM (88.1) in Long Beach. "There was just no more fuel to go on and we were running on fumes as it was."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So, let the competition between KFWB-AM (980) and KNX-AM (1070) continue. Shortly after he was named head of the combined Westinghouse and CBS radio stations last week, Dan Mason confirmed that he has no intention of changing the formats of Southern California's two leading news stations. "I see them as their own unique products, totally separate," Mason declared in an interview. "They're both very successful news stations in the market, and I see no reason to change."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
For the third year in a row, ABC News White House correspondent Sam Donaldson has been selected by Washington Journalism Review readers poll as the best television correspondent in its Best in the Business Awards. The only other three-time winner is CBS News' Dan Rather, who this year tied for best television anchor with ABC News anchor Peter Jennings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2000
Gary D. Clark, 61, former KNX-AM radio newsman who helped establish the Associated Press Radio Network. Clark was much admired by colleagues, one of whom described him as "one of the hardest-working guys in the business [who] never let anything slow him down." That "anything" was polio, which struck Clark at age 10 and left him needing canes and leg braces to walk. He began his radio news career at KSPI in Stillwater, Okla., and KBIX in Muskogee, Okla.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dodger managers used to be the paradigm of job continuity, with only Walter Alston and Tommy Lasorda holding that position from 1954 to 1996. But after a few years of upheaval at Chavez Ravine, now KNX-AM (1070) may be setting the example, as the station has just named a news director--only its fourth since it went all-news in 1968. Ed Pyle takes over the job from Bob Sims, who is retiring after 33 years at KNX.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
CBS news writers, graphic artists and other staffers who work for the network's television and radio news operations voted by a wide margin to authorize a strike against their employer, the Writers Guild of America announced Monday. Of the 300 employees who cast ballots in last week's special election, 81% backed a labor stoppage to protest working for more than 2 1/2 years without a contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2004 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Live news is now a dead issue on L.A.'s two most prominent news radio stations. In the latest ripple from the continuing crackdown on profanity and sexuality in broadcasts, CBS/Infinity stations KNX-AM (1070) and KFWB-AM (980) have instituted a delay on live newscasts, and banished live interviews and phone calls. The delay is reportedly seven seconds, although station management would not confirm the exact length.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Anne Garrels is a loner, and excels at conveying stories of ordinary people in extraordinarily bad situations -- qualities that served her when the National Public Radio correspondent was the only American broadcaster to remain in Baghdad during the Iraq war. These attributes aren't as helpful, though, when she's on a book tour of the U.S. and she's the subject of the story. "I'm getting so sick of myself. Thank God I have a day job," Garrels quipped during her stop this week in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2003 | Elizabeth Jensen and Greg Braxton, Times staff writers
There will be no shortage of television and radio recall election coverage tonight, although there may be a shortage of results to report. The broadcast and cable networks, along with some local stations and newspapers, have banded together to commission an exit poll. But no results will be released before all polls close at 8 p.m., and networks, mindful of early wrong projections during the 2000 presidential campaign, might not project winners at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dodger managers used to be the paradigm of job continuity, with only Walter Alston and Tommy Lasorda holding that position from 1954 to 1996. But after a few years of upheaval at Chavez Ravine, now KNX-AM (1070) may be setting the example, as the station has just named a news director--only its fourth since it went all-news in 1968. Ed Pyle takes over the job from Bob Sims, who is retiring after 33 years at KNX.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A delightful discovery, a little humor, and a chance to breathe and reflect--that's an awful lot to pack into a 10-second snippet of music. Especially one nestled in the middle of a news program. "All Things Considered," the afternoon newsmagazine on National Public Radio, features two hours daily of headlines and features.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Pittsburgh radio news director won $8,000 in severance pay from her former employers, the management of WBZZ-FM, after she was fired for walking off the job over on-air sexist jokes targeted at her by two WBZZ deejays. Arbitrator Ronald F.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Network radio, long regarded as a quaint relic from a bygone era, is enjoying something of a renaissance among local stations since the outbreak of the Gulf War. Radio stations have not been required to broadcast news or public affairs programming since the industry was deregulated in the early 1980s. But the Gulf War has spurred many all-music stations to affiliate with a network that provides news.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2001 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A radio show that broadcasts silence from an Alaskan glacier and has a host watching sparks in a darkened closet might not be expected to hold listeners 30 seconds, much less 30 years. But this month, "All Things Considered" on National Public Radio enters its fourth decade with the same recipe of news and novelty. The show debuted May 3, 1971, with a report from a student war protest here as police teargassed the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | MAIJA-LIISA NAGARAJAN
A traffic information and emergency radio station will be available next year for commuters traveling to Los Angeles from Pacific Coast Highway or the 101, 405 and 10 freeways, a Caltrans official said Wednesday. If there's an accident that will create more than a half-hour delay, Caltrans personnel will relay the problem, the time estimated to clear it and alternate routes to motorists when it is on the air next year, said Sameer Haddadeen, Caltrans' senior transportation engineer.
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