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WORLD
February 11, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
The days of apartheid are over, but listeners of Radio Pretoria can still wake up and sip their coffee to the strains of the apartheid-era national anthem, "Die Stem." They tune in to talk shows where pundits frown on the mixed marriages and interracial socializing that have accompanied the demise of apartheid. They hear debate over whether the AIDS crisis is helping curb the black birth rate, or enjoy cultural programs featuring German marching music and rousing Swiss yodeling.
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WORLD
February 11, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
The days of apartheid are over, but listeners of Radio Pretoria can still wake up and sip their coffee to the strains of the apartheid-era national anthem, "Die Stem." They tune in to talk shows where pundits frown on the mixed marriages and interracial socializing that have accompanied the demise of apartheid. They hear debate over whether the AIDS crisis is helping curb the black birth rate, or enjoy cultural programs featuring German marching music and rousing Swiss yodeling.
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NEWS
January 31, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As security chief of this nation's first renegade radio station, Pieter le Roux is clearly proud of his handiwork. Atop a treeless hill, past the roadblocks and armed guards, is a newly dug moat. Razor wire bristles on a fence, and gun ports dot a concrete wall beside the gate. Inside are two lines of trenches topped with sandbags. Then chest-high barricades of sandbags, and a wall of tires filled with dirt, protect the broadcast tower and tiny studio. But the rebel redoubt isn't quite complete.
NEWS
January 31, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As security chief of this nation's first renegade radio station, Pieter le Roux is clearly proud of his handiwork. Atop a treeless hill, past the roadblocks and armed guards, is a newly dug moat. Razor wire bristles on a fence, and gun ports dot a concrete wall beside the gate. Inside are two lines of trenches topped with sandbags. Then chest-high barricades of sandbags, and a wall of tires filled with dirt, protect the broadcast tower and tiny studio. But the rebel redoubt isn't quite complete.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As military strongholds go, Ft. Klapperkop has little to boast about. It is small and poorly situated and, since its opening 100 years ago today, has been of dubious strategic value. But as powerful symbols go, the brick and brownstone garrison has few rivals in this erstwhile capital of the Transvaal Republic, one of the ill-fated independent states founded in the 1800s by white Afrikaner farmers. Ft.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson Mandela went on the political offensive here in the heart of right-wing country Monday, administering a kind of shock therapy to a roomful of stunned white Afrikaners. For nearly two hours, Mandela alternately mocked and scolded about 350 mostly white business and academic leaders invited by the town's business forum to a question-and-answer session with the man expected to become South Africa's first black president after democratic elections in April.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The debate in the Dutton household here Wednesday, as in so many right-wing white homes in this mining town, was not who to vote for, but whether to vote at all. Frank and Myra Dutton wanted to vote. Their 26-year-old son did not. Finally, the son gave his father the keys to his car. "Go ahead and vote," he said. "But not me." And his parents waited two hours, avoiding being sandwiched between new black voters, to cast their ballots for the rightist Freedom Front.
NEWS
October 22, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To speak of radio in Africa is to discuss life and death. And a good deal of everything in between. Shortwave, FM, transistor, battery, solar, clock, windup--radio is the central nervous system of this very nervous, decentralized continent. Much of the rest of the world may be drowning in the flood of data from the Information Age. But in Africa, for hundreds of millions of people, events over the next hill and beyond are known by just two means: word of mouth as carried by travelers--and word of mouth as broadcast on radio.
WORLD
March 30, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Under apartheid, homelands were created to isolate and repress blacks. Here in the crackling heat of the high bush, where jackals and antelope roam wildflower-carpeted mountains, some South Africans are dreaming of another kind of homeland: for white people. Not just any white people, but conservative white Afrikaners who feel displaced by black majority rule and say their Bible abhors the racial mixing that is a feature of the new South Africa.
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