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September 16, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the first time since KKGO-FM dropped jazz and turned to a classical format two years ago, the Orange County-Los Angeles area has a commercial jazz station. Calling itself "Jazz FM 103.1," KBJZ (in Newport Beach) and KAJZ (in Santa Monica) hit the airwaves last week, offering what program director Lawrence Tanter describes as a "smooth jazz" format.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Less than three months after Harry Shearer's long-running radio program "Le Show" was dropped from the airwaves by its longtime Los Angeles area host, KCRW-FM (89.9), the Santa Monica public station's smaller crosstown rival KCSN-FM (88.5) has announced plans to resume broadcasting the show in the same 10 a.m. Sunday slot it occupied at KCRW. "I'm pleased and proud to have 'Le Show' carried on a station (and associated online stream) that really wants it," Shearer told The Times on Tuesday by email from London.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2000
Scholastic Inc. has launched a half-hour Internet-radio program aimed at providing information of interest to schoolteachers. "Teacher Radio," which premiered Monday, is available Monday through Thursday (with the audio feed available any time that day) via http://www.scholastic.com.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2011 | From a Times staff writer
Beryl Davis, a British-born singer who became a star in America performing with Frank Sinatra and Benny Goodman during the big-band era, died Friday in Los Angeles. She was 87. The cause of death was complications from Alzheimer's disease, according to family spokesman Greg Purdy. The daughter of English band leader Harry Davis, she was born in Plymouth, England, on March 16, 1924, and began performing with her father at the age of 3. At 12 she was appearing with Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt in their all-string jazz band, Quintette du Hot Club de France.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2008 | associated press
Popular cable TV host Bill O'Reilly will step down as the host of his syndicated talk radio show early next year, saying he can "no longer give both TV and radio the time they deserve." "The Radio Factor" -- which began in 2002 and runs on more than 400 radio stations, as well as satellite operator Sirius XM Radio Inc. -- will end in the first quarter of 2009, Fox News Channel said. Locally, the show airs weekdays 9-11 a.m. on KABC-AM (790). O'Reilly will continue hosting "The O'Reilly Factor" on the Fox News Channel and writing his weekly newspaper column.
MAGAZINE
June 16, 2002 | MARY DAILY
The first voice many Southern Californians hear on Sunday is Andrea Leonard's. The host of 89.9 FM KCRW's "Morning Glory," from 5 to 7 a.m., delights adventurous gospel music lovers with an eclectic array of spiritual music. "It's a looser interpretation of gospel, beyond the traditional," she says. "It's anything with a religious theme, from jazz to alternative rock." With contemporary gospel easy to find, Leonard, 35, plays more off-the-beaten-track selections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Bill Ward, former president of Gene Autry's Golden West Broadcasters and general manager of KMPC radio who helped spread the popularity of country music and auto racing on radio in Southern California as general manager of KLAC in the 1970s, has died. He was 65. Ward died July 30 of an apparent heart attack at his home in Sherman Oaks, said his son, Cameron.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred and Ron Beaton--the brothers who own and operate KIEV talk radio station--want to do the right thing. Problem is, when guests on their latest talk show, called "Intimate Matters," speak explicitly on such topics as how piercing the genitals with rings can enhance sexual pleasure, the Beaton brothers don't know exactly what the right thing is.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1990
The network TV series "Cheers," "The Wonder Years" and "China Beach," and the syndicated "Twilight Zone" received two nominations each Thursday from the Writers Guild of America in its annual nominations for outstanding achievement in television and radio writing during the 1988-89 season. The eclectic list of 60 nominations in 15 categories included programs written for PBS, basic-cable TV, pay-TV and an unsold network pilot. Nominations covered the period between Sept. 1, 1988 and Aug.
NEWS
February 27, 1994
Frank Strasek, 81, a musician and host of a World War II radio program credited with selling millions of dollars in war bonds. Strasek was a trumpet player in several well-known big bands, including the California Collegians band, which included saxophonist Fred MacMurray before MacMurray became a prominent actor. Later, Strasek played with Horace Heidt and his Musical Knights for five years in New York City, where actor-comedian Art Carney was a band member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Charles McPhee, the self-proclaimed "Dream Doctor" who decoded dreams on his nationally syndicated radio show until Lou Gehrig's disease forced him off the air in 2006, has died. He was 49. McPhee died May 8 at his Woodland Hills home of the neurodegenerative disease also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, his family said. Through his radio show, McPhee "made dream interpretation more present in pop culture," said Cynthia Richmond, a behavioral therapist and dream counselor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2010 | By Carla Rivera
Gene Chenault, one half of a pioneering team that helped to revolutionize rock radio programming in the 1960s with the "Boss Radio" format, first at KHJ in Los Angeles and then coast to coast, has died. He was 90. Chenault died of non-Hodgkin lymphoma Tuesday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center, said his wife, Susan. In the 1960s, Chenault partnered with Bill Drake to launch a phenomenally successful radio format that turned poorly performing stations into ratings winners and made household names of radio personalities such as Robert W. Morgan and "the Real" Don Steele.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
Annie Mai knows what it's like to be the only Vietnamese student in class. She understands what it is to have parents who work long hours and are unable to help their children with schoolwork. And she can relate when a child must translate for her parents during teacher conferences. Mai was 7 when her family arrived in Orange County in 1979 and was immediately confronted with such challenges. Now an education consultant for the Garden Grove Unified School District, she knows that Vietnamese families still face many of the same difficulties.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2008 | associated press
Popular cable TV host Bill O'Reilly will step down as the host of his syndicated talk radio show early next year, saying he can "no longer give both TV and radio the time they deserve." "The Radio Factor" -- which began in 2002 and runs on more than 400 radio stations, as well as satellite operator Sirius XM Radio Inc. -- will end in the first quarter of 2009, Fox News Channel said. Locally, the show airs weekdays 9-11 a.m. on KABC-AM (790). O'Reilly will continue hosting "The O'Reilly Factor" on the Fox News Channel and writing his weekly newspaper column.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2008 | Deborah Netburn, Times Staff Writer
It's somewhere past 6 p.m. in the middle of the gas-guzzling commute home from work, and certain Southland residents with certain types of radio presets are used to passing this time pleasantly enough with "All Things Considered" on KPCC-FM (89.3). Except today (and for the last couple of weeks), people are not so interested in the first woman who ran for president in 1872 or this week's installment of "This I Believe." They want the juicy stuff -- news about Fed Chairman Ben S.
WORLD
January 19, 2008 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
For some Mexicans, it was as if a combination of Diane Sawyer and Christiane Amanpour had been summarily bounced from the airwaves. That's been the widespread reaction to the Jan. 4 decision by journalist Carmen Aristegui to end her prominent 5-year-old morning talk show on the capital's W Radio, due to what she described as growing editorial differences with the station's co-owners, Mexico's multimedia giant Grupo Televisa and Grupo Prisa, Spain's largest media conglomerate.
NEWS
November 15, 1986 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Information Agency Director Charles Z. Wick is sounding out U.S. broadcasters on whether they would be willing to air Radio Moscow programs in return for U.S. access to Soviet radio audiences and, incidentally, the cessation of Soviet jamming of the Voice of America. Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev originally suggested to President Reagan at last month's Reykjavik summit that he would stop jamming if given access to U.S. radio facilities. Wick, in separate conversations with Alexander N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2000 | TIMOTHY HUGHES
Jeff Barry, program director with KCLU-FM (88.3), will leave his position at the public radio station Jan. 2 to join the Ventura County Sheriff's Department's training academy. Barry, 24, who has been with the station for four years, said he'll enter the training academy's next class, which begins Jan. 8. Training will last seven months, he said. "I have to start at the bottom and work my way up," said Barry, who received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Cal Lutheran University.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Public radio show "Marketplace" dropped a San Diego-based financial advisor as a commentator after concluding that he lifted language from online magazine Slate. Gabriel Wisdom had been providing commentaries for the nationally distributed program since 2003. His last appearance on June 13 mentioned the economic theories of author Michael Panzner. Executive producer J.J.
WORLD
April 21, 2005 | Tyler Marshall and David Holley, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice reached past Russian officialdom Wednesday to speak directly to the people of Moscow, giving a freewheeling, hourlong interview on radio that included the geopolitical and the personal as she tried to reassure listeners that the United States was not working against their country. Many listeners e-mailed questions on the live broadcast to the station. Squeezed into a tiny transmission studio at the independent Echo of Moscow, Rice told listeners that the U.S.
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