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February 23, 1990
The network TV series "Cheers," "The Wonder Years" and "China Beach," and the syndicated "Twilight Zone" received two nominations each Thursday from the Writers Guild of America in its annual nominations for outstanding achievement in television and radio writing during the 1988-89 season. The eclectic list of 60 nominations in 15 categories included programs written for PBS, basic-cable TV, pay-TV and an unsold network pilot. Nominations covered the period between Sept. 1, 1988 and Aug.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Less than three months after Harry Shearer's long-running radio program "Le Show" was dropped from the airwaves by its longtime Los Angeles area host, KCRW-FM (89.9), the Santa Monica public station's smaller crosstown rival KCSN-FM (88.5) has announced plans to resume broadcasting the show in the same 10 a.m. Sunday slot it occupied at KCRW. "I'm pleased and proud to have 'Le Show' carried on a station (and associated online stream) that really wants it," Shearer told The Times on Tuesday by email from London.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | ALAN EYERLY
After a one-year hiatus, Irvine Valley College student Chris Vollentine is bringing his "GayRadio" program back to the airwaves. The variety show will be broadcast from midnight to 1 a.m. Wednesday mornings on KWIZ-FM 96.7 starting this week. The Tustin resident, who calls himself Chris Creem on the radio, said his program will alternate between serious and entertaining topics that are designed to appeal to gays and lesbians of all ages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2013 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
The Uchinaaguchi class opened with a "good morning. " " Ukimi soo chii ," said the teacher, Chogi Higa. " Ukimi soo chii ," the students repeated. For student Tokie Koyama, the greeting was a bittersweet echo of her childhood on Okinawa. "It makes me cry," she told the class. "I miss home. " Famous for its military bases and World War II battlefields, the Japanese island chain of Okinawa is also home to a language as different from Japanese as English is from German.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
The walls of Hyder Akbar's bedroom reveal a conflict of identity uncommon to most suburban teenagers, even those like him -- ethnically Afghan but culturally American. Two large U2 posters consume one wall, and a group photo of his Concord High School graduating class is tacked near the door. But in a corner next to his stereo, Akbar has created a shrine to his family's battle-weary native country.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
"The Drama Hour," a staple for two decades on KNX-AM (1070) and the modern-day home to Jack Benny, the Shadow and other voices from radio's Golden Age, bowed out Friday with its broadcast of Orson Welles' "War of the Worlds." Pat Duffy, who oversees both KNX and KFWB-AM (980) as the local AM vice president of their parent company, Infinity Radio, cited the Iraq war, the recall election, labor strikes, wildland fires and other breaking news as the reason to end the 9-10 p.m. broadcast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pouches under Omar Khatab's puffy eyes are from pure fatigue. His voice is weak, his speech slow. Twenty minutes is all he needs. Time for meditation and quiet, time to close his eyes. Then, he says, as if willing it so, "I'll be fine." Khatab, 46, runs one of the country's longest-running Afghan radio programs. Operating out of studios in Orange and Canoga Park, he buys time on the airwaves in Southern California, Toronto and Washington, D.C., for his weekly show, Radio Payame Afghan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waving rainbow banners and American flags, Orange County gays and lesbians celebrated National Coming Out Day on Sunday and protested what they said was a death threat made against them on a local radio show. About 200 people at Main Beach held signs and waved at passing motorists, many of whom honked to show their support. The group stood across the street from a movie theater showing "In & Out," a coming-out comedy starring Kevin Kline.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business, like nuclear physics and brain surgery, was long considered a subject beyond the grasp of common folk. And many are the vested interests that wanted to keep it that way. As long as John Q. Public was unable to tell a hedge fund from a hedgerow, armies of well-paid financial advisors were guaranteed employment.
WORLD
March 1, 2004 | Regine Labossiere and Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writers
Hours before President Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigned, Haitians throughout Southern California were getting their Saturday night blend of Caribbean music and news from back home on a radio show broadcast from Riverside County. Throughout the hourlong program, listeners called in to make their feelings known. "Democracy can't do anything with him just sitting on his throne while people are dying," one caller said in Creole. "He must accept that he must go."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2012
Seven months after dropping a movie project based on the board game "Ouija" over concerns about its proposed budget of about $150 million, Universal Pictures is again planning to make the picture — but at a much reduced cost. The studio on Monday announced it was going to target the film for release in 2013 but did not say when it planned to begin production. People familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak publicly said the new "Ouija," which will be produced by Jason Blum ("Paranormal Activity")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2011 | From a Times staff writer
Beryl Davis, a British-born singer who became a star in America performing with Frank Sinatra and Benny Goodman during the big-band era, died Friday in Los Angeles. She was 87. The cause of death was complications from Alzheimer's disease, according to family spokesman Greg Purdy. The daughter of English band leader Harry Davis, she was born in Plymouth, England, on March 16, 1924, and began performing with her father at the age of 3. At 12 she was appearing with Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt in their all-string jazz band, Quintette du Hot Club de France.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Charles McPhee, the self-proclaimed "Dream Doctor" who decoded dreams on his nationally syndicated radio show until Lou Gehrig's disease forced him off the air in 2006, has died. He was 49. McPhee died May 8 at his Woodland Hills home of the neurodegenerative disease also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, his family said. Through his radio show, McPhee "made dream interpretation more present in pop culture," said Cynthia Richmond, a behavioral therapist and dream counselor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2010 | By Carla Rivera
Gene Chenault, one half of a pioneering team that helped to revolutionize rock radio programming in the 1960s with the "Boss Radio" format, first at KHJ in Los Angeles and then coast to coast, has died. He was 90. Chenault died of non-Hodgkin lymphoma Tuesday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center, said his wife, Susan. In the 1960s, Chenault partnered with Bill Drake to launch a phenomenally successful radio format that turned poorly performing stations into ratings winners and made household names of radio personalities such as Robert W. Morgan and "the Real" Don Steele.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
Annie Mai knows what it's like to be the only Vietnamese student in class. She understands what it is to have parents who work long hours and are unable to help their children with schoolwork. And she can relate when a child must translate for her parents during teacher conferences. Mai was 7 when her family arrived in Orange County in 1979 and was immediately confronted with such challenges. Now an education consultant for the Garden Grove Unified School District, she knows that Vietnamese families still face many of the same difficulties.
NATIONAL
September 14, 2009 | Brian Haas
"Inside the Mind of Mark Foley," hosted by Florida's disgraced ex-congressman, is set to begin airing on AM radio in north Palm Beach County next week. The Republican resigned from the House in 2006 amid allegations he sent sexually explicit computer messages to an underage page. His show will focus on current politics, WSVU-AM (960) station operations director Joe Raineri said. "We just thought, a former U.S. congressman who knows those guys who are there right now, understands the game of politics -- who better to shed some light on it than Mark Foley?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
Annie Mai knows what it's like to be the only Vietnamese student in class. She understands what it is to have parents who work long hours and are unable to help their children with schoolwork. And she can relate when a child must translate for her parents during teacher conferences. Mai was 7 when her family arrived in Orange County in 1979 and was immediately confronted with such challenges. Now an education consultant for the Garden Grove Unified School District, she knows that Vietnamese families still face many of the same difficulties.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each Thursday night precisely at 8, one of the strangest radio shows in America fades in with an eerie mechanical hum and the heavy thump of military helicopter rotor blades. For deejay Dan Lawrence, it is a flashback to his own painful past and a sign of what's to come: a sampling of classic rock that's somehow all about Vietnam, presented by a man who remains inalterably scarred by the war's legacy.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2009 | P.J. Huffstutter
Deejay Chris Oaks hunched over a studio soundboard at WFIN-AM radio, ignoring the cramp in his lower back and the flashing lights from the phone lines. He listened to the voice in his headphones: a man calling in to sell a pair of air conditioners for $60 each. "I need the money more than I need to stay cool," the man said. Oaks nodded. "I hope you're not selling all that you have," he said as the temperature outside hovered in the mid-90s. "You may need one." For more than seven years, Oaks, a skinny, mustachioed man of 42 whose uniform is a rumpled plaid polo shirt and faded jeans, has broadcast radio want ads over the expanse of Ohio farmland.
WORLD
September 2, 2009 | Mark Magnier
Fasi Zaka settles his 320-pound frame into a swivel chair in the small, stuffy FM studio, pulls his microphone close and lets it rip. An upwardly mobile caller seeks a girlfriend and wonders whether he should move overseas for love and fortune. Adopting an exaggerated posh South Asian accent, Zaka gently mocks the man's concerns. "I want young girl. I am engineer," he says, speaking in a clipped, whiny fashion for comic effect. "Give me green card. I love America," he continues, before letting out a belly laugh and moving on to the next caller: "OK, buddy, hope you get someone."
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