Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRadio Sawa
IN THE NEWS

Radio Sawa

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
December 9, 2003 | Steven L. Spiegel, Steven L. Spiegel is director of the Mideast regional security program at the Burkle Center for International Relations and a professor of political science at UCLA.
The report by the State Department's Advisory Group on Public Diplomacy for the Arab and Muslim World in October was supposed to offer suggestions for how the United States could improve its ailing image in the Arab world. But the report foolishly criticized one of the most successful, innovative programs operating today, the new U.S. government-sponsored Radio Sawa.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
August 23, 2004 | Ashraf Khalil, Special to The Times
When Iraqi talk radio host Majid Salim recently asked his listeners whether Saddam Hussein should be imprisoned, executed or set free, the switchboard swiftly lighted up. Some attacked Hussein. But others attacked Salim, accusing him of being either pro- or anti-Hussein. One caller threatened to cut out Salim's tongue. "Even when they swear at me, I say, 'Thank you very much,' " said Salim, of Radio Dijla, or Radio Tigris. Welcome to the nascent Iraqi Talk Nation.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2002 | DIANA ELIAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Young Arabs tuning in to a new American government radio station designed especially for them rave about its international playlist--but many are not happy with its news reports. They see it as propaganda. In targeting the 30-and-under crowd who make up 60% of the Arab world's 280 million people, Radio Sawa has ditched the news and public-affairs focus of the Voice of America Arabic-language service it replaced.
OPINION
December 18, 2003
In his defense of U.S. government-sponsored Radio Sawa (Commentary, Dec. 9), Steven Spiegel criticizes a credible report on U.S. public diplomacy for the Arab/Muslim world. The report examines the United States' negative image and makes recommendations that take the region's people seriously and that could contribute to understanding and mutual respect. It acknowledges "that much of the resentment toward America stems from real conflicts and displeasure with policies, including those involving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and Iraq."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
The plan to enlist Britney Spears and the Backstreet Boys in the fight to win the hearts and minds of young Middle Easterners is apparently working, according to survey figures released Thursday from Radio Sawa, the U.S. government-funded Arabic-language radio service. Since it launched in March 2002, Sawa has become No. 1 or No. 2 station in the countries where it's broadcast, according to research figures released Thursday by the U.S.
OPINION
December 18, 2003
In his defense of U.S. government-sponsored Radio Sawa (Commentary, Dec. 9), Steven Spiegel criticizes a credible report on U.S. public diplomacy for the Arab/Muslim world. The report examines the United States' negative image and makes recommendations that take the region's people seriously and that could contribute to understanding and mutual respect. It acknowledges "that much of the resentment toward America stems from real conflicts and displeasure with policies, including those involving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and Iraq."
NEWS
May 10, 2003 | Josh Getlin and Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writers
As the 5 p.m. deadline approached in a small, crowded newsroom, reporters and editors raced to finish stories for their nightly broadcast. Perched on a wall above them, a battery of television screens flashed dramatically different images of the U.S. military role in postwar Iraq. On one monitor, the Hezbollah-funded Al Manar TV channel beamed grisly pictures of bombing damage in Baghdad.
NEWS
April 11, 2003 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Now that Iraqi television has gone off the air, the information war is on. Viewers in Iraq saw a new look Thursday on the nation's Channel 3, produced not by Saddam Hussein's regime but by the Pentagon. And the U.S. Broadcasting Board of Governors is planning an even more ambitious program, to air as early as next week, that would put on Iraqi airwaves the news shows of most of America's major networks.
WORLD
August 23, 2004 | Ashraf Khalil, Special to The Times
When Iraqi talk radio host Majid Salim recently asked his listeners whether Saddam Hussein should be imprisoned, executed or set free, the switchboard swiftly lighted up. Some attacked Hussein. But others attacked Salim, accusing him of being either pro- or anti-Hussein. One caller threatened to cut out Salim's tongue. "Even when they swear at me, I say, 'Thank you very much,' " said Salim, of Radio Dijla, or Radio Tigris. Welcome to the nascent Iraqi Talk Nation.
WORLD
August 26, 2002 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 4:15 p.m. and Nasser Husseini, a commando in America's new war of influence in the Middle East, is bopping and sweating inside his tiny glass box in the bowels of the Voice of America building. Husseini doesn't read the news. He pours it into the mike, fast and fluid, punctuating each headline with an electronic exclamation mark. Then comes the hit music. You've heard the sound a million times on commercial radio. This, however, is Radio Sawa, compliments of the U.S. government.
OPINION
December 9, 2003 | Steven L. Spiegel, Steven L. Spiegel is director of the Mideast regional security program at the Burkle Center for International Relations and a professor of political science at UCLA.
The report by the State Department's Advisory Group on Public Diplomacy for the Arab and Muslim World in October was supposed to offer suggestions for how the United States could improve its ailing image in the Arab world. But the report foolishly criticized one of the most successful, innovative programs operating today, the new U.S. government-sponsored Radio Sawa.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
The plan to enlist Britney Spears and the Backstreet Boys in the fight to win the hearts and minds of young Middle Easterners is apparently working, according to survey figures released Thursday from Radio Sawa, the U.S. government-funded Arabic-language radio service. Since it launched in March 2002, Sawa has become No. 1 or No. 2 station in the countries where it's broadcast, according to research figures released Thursday by the U.S.
NEWS
May 10, 2003 | Josh Getlin and Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writers
As the 5 p.m. deadline approached in a small, crowded newsroom, reporters and editors raced to finish stories for their nightly broadcast. Perched on a wall above them, a battery of television screens flashed dramatically different images of the U.S. military role in postwar Iraq. On one monitor, the Hezbollah-funded Al Manar TV channel beamed grisly pictures of bombing damage in Baghdad.
NEWS
April 11, 2003 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Now that Iraqi television has gone off the air, the information war is on. Viewers in Iraq saw a new look Thursday on the nation's Channel 3, produced not by Saddam Hussein's regime but by the Pentagon. And the U.S. Broadcasting Board of Governors is planning an even more ambitious program, to air as early as next week, that would put on Iraqi airwaves the news shows of most of America's major networks.
WORLD
August 26, 2002 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 4:15 p.m. and Nasser Husseini, a commando in America's new war of influence in the Middle East, is bopping and sweating inside his tiny glass box in the bowels of the Voice of America building. Husseini doesn't read the news. He pours it into the mike, fast and fluid, punctuating each headline with an electronic exclamation mark. Then comes the hit music. You've heard the sound a million times on commercial radio. This, however, is Radio Sawa, compliments of the U.S. government.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2002 | DIANA ELIAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Young Arabs tuning in to a new American government radio station designed especially for them rave about its international playlist--but many are not happy with its news reports. They see it as propaganda. In targeting the 30-and-under crowd who make up 60% of the Arab world's 280 million people, Radio Sawa has ditched the news and public-affairs focus of the Voice of America Arabic-language service it replaced.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | Susan Carpenter
The site: www.radio sawa.com/english_sp.cfm It's American radio, albeit with a Middle Eastern twist. On the FM dial in the U.S., rare is the radio station that would play Madonna or Beyonce back to back with sitar-playing pop stars and Bollywood bangra tunes, but it's all part of programming funded by the U.S. government. Log on if you want to hear what young Middle Easterners are listening to; just don't expect to find out who the artists are. Back announcements are in Arabic. * The site: www.
NATIONAL
August 30, 2002 | From Reuters
The director of the Voice of America, Robert Reilly, resigned Thursday after less than a year in the job, the Broadcasting Board of Governors said. VOA sources said the agency had been in turmoil under Reilly's leadership, particularly over plans to set up new language services targeted to Middle East audiences but without the "impartiality" provisions in the VOA charter.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|