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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Bill Ballance, a groundbreaking Los Angeles radio personality and talk-radio pioneer who was the host of the popular and controversial "Feminine Forum" in the 1970s and various talk shows over the next two decades, has died. He 85. Ballance, who was known for his free-spirited spontaneity, double entendres and one-liners, died Thursday at his home in San Diego. He had been in failing health since June 2002 after undergoing quadruple bypass surgery and suffering a stroke, said his son, Jim.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2011
Charlie Sheen has a whole pile of troubles, and he's not helping himself by calling into radio talk shows. ( Los Angeles Times ) While you were going about your Valentine's Day silliness, two nerds and Alex Trebek were battling a machine for the future of humankind. (Good news: the humans appear to be holding their own so far.) ( Los Angeles Times ) Energy companies are trying to get one film in this year's Oscar race disqualified. ( Los Angeles Times ) KCBS reporter Serene Branson says she's feeling OK after her scary on-air incident Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1994 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Parents angry over the elimination of the valedictorian award at Saugus High School are expected to be out in force at the meeting of the William S. Hart Union High School District board tonight. The controversy over the top grades award erupted earlier this year when the school held its first graduation without a valedictorian, salutatorian and top-10 student honors. Instead, the school designated anyone with a 3.75 or higher grade point average as an honors student.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Savvy radio talk show host Bill Ballance, who dispenses advice to lovelorn callers Monday through Saturday nights on KFMB-AM in San Diego, has little sympathy for the current plight of New York shock-jock Howard Stern. "I don't want to sound self-righteous or generate any bogus piety, but if what I hear he (Stern) says is true, I definitely support the FCC's position," said Ballance, a nine-year veteran of KFMB's 7 p.m.-to-1 a.m. air shift.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2011 | By Steve Carney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Before "The Soup" or any number of cable television shows filled their airtime with celebrity mockery and current-events satire, morning radio hosts made such bits their stock in trade. Now, some of those radio hosts will turn the tables and bring their snark and silliness to TV viewers around the country. "Dish Nation" puts cameras in the studios of drive-time radio shows in Los Angeles, New York, Atlanta and Detroit and gives viewers a best-of collection of jokes and interviews from that day's programs.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | JACK SMITH
As a friend, colleague, admirer and playful opponent of Herb Caen, I read with inescapable bias the recent Times story suggesting that Caen is "disenchanted" with San Francisco, and has "lost touch" with the city he loves. At 71 Caen has surely lost some of his ardor. For all I know his feet hurt. His column in the Chronicle is older than the bridges. He has seen the shipping go. He has seen the Embarcadero touristized. He has seen the skyline Manhattanized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a brutal overnight attack on sleeping university students in Tehran. Police and Islamic hard-liners clubbed the students, killing at least one and injuring many others, according to one human rights organization. Hours later, Iranian Americans in Los Angeles were reading a firsthand account. "Hello from the Tehran Bloodshed," began the e-mail sent by a student who said he was beaten in the July 9 raid on the Tehran University dormitory, which ended with 120 arrests.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minutes after he kicked off the first-ever "Tonight" show back in 1954, Steve Allen peered into an NBC camera, shuffled some white note cards on the desk and cracked his opening joke: "I want to give you the bad news first, folks," he told a national audience. "This show is going to go on forever." He was talking about the program's late hour, but on that historic fall evening in New York, Allen was more clairvoyant than he knew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1986 | DAVID WHARTON
"What we're selling is a dream." Bill Seaton, director of public relations for California Lottery State lottery officials had heard the joke. People were saying that to win the lottery you had to be an illegal alien or owe child support. And there seemed to be some truth to it. After Jose Caballero won $2 million, he was found to be living in the United States illegally and was deported to Mexico.
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