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Radio Signals

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Should Orange County be struck by earthquake, fire or flood in the new millennium, officials say they will be able to react faster and better than ever before thanks to a nearly $80-million emergency response system to be unveiled in December 2000. The 800-megahertz radio network will link all police, fire and public works agencies in the county to one radio frequency and give them the ability to directly communicate with one another--something they now can't do.
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NEWS
August 16, 1998 | JONATHAN OATIS, REUTERS
Tap out an SOS for Morse code. At least as far as many ships at sea are concerned, it is going down for the last time. As of Feb. 1, 1999, all passenger ships and all cargo ships of 300 gross tons or more will no longer use Morse code for distress calls, relying instead on the global satellite communications system that has all but taken its place under an international agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1998
A federal agency agreed Thursday to grant the use of several unused radio frequencies to South Bay cities--a year after a law mandated it. "At last, South Bay's law enforcement and emergency response agencies will be able to communicate across geographic boundaries using common frequencies," said Rep. Jane Harman (D-Torrance).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997 | RON HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Is the truth really out there? A handful of scientists listening intently for faint radio signals from distant solar systems are keeping their ears, and minds, open to that possibility. Like their Hollywood counterparts in the movie "Contact," scientists at the SETI Institute hunt for life in space using powerful radio telescopes. SETI, short for Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, is surveying 1,000 stars similar to our sun but light years distant.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators are prepared to approve a plan that will create a new breed of radio stations that can be heard anywhere in the country and will probably be the first pay radio. After five years of work, the Federal Communications Commission is expected to set aside a portion of the airwaves for the service today. The service is to be transmitted nationally or regionally by satellite in digital CD-quality sound, FCC officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | NONA YATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One-Adam-12, 1-Adam-12, 211 in progress, corner 5th and Main, Code 3. If Jack Webb were alive today, the erstwhile Sgt. Joe Friday of "Dragnet" fame would be amazed at who might be listening in on his favorite police department's radio calls. Police buffs, reporters and others have used radio scanners for years to monitor the calls between squad cars and dispatchers. But their use was largely limited by geography.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1997 | CATHERINE COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The departure lounge in any airport terminal tells the story. Dozens of men and women in suits are clasping cellular phones between ears and shoulders, peering at beepers, scanning electronic calendars and tapping on laptop keyboards. This is personal electronics at its most powerful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Zapping nerves in the neck with radio waves can temporarily relieve the pain of whiplash, Australian doctors report in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers found that the three-hour treatment, called percutaneous radio-frequency neurotomy, could make the pain go away for more than a year. Eventually, though, the procedure had to be repeated when the nerves grew back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1995 | RENE LYNCH and HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal authorities are threatening to rescind precious radio frequencies dedicated for an emergency communications system in Orange County unless the $84-million project meets an October construction deadline, officials said Tuesday. The Federal Communications Commission system requires that at least one field radio be operating by mid-October. Six weeks before that deadline, the county has yet to finalize and sign a contract with Motorola Communications and Electronics Inc., officials said.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defense industry is disappearing and the local economy is in the doldrums, but a young company called Qualcomm, founded by a pair of former computer science professors, is inspiring hope that this city will be lifted by high tech. Qualcomm Inc.'s technology is certainly arcane: Going by the name of Code Division Multiple Access, or CDMA, it's essentially a complicated way of sending digital radio signals over the airwaves.
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