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Radio Signals

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1998
A federal agency agreed Thursday to grant the use of several unused radio frequencies to South Bay cities--a year after a law mandated it. "At last, South Bay's law enforcement and emergency response agencies will be able to communicate across geographic boundaries using common frequencies," said Rep. Jane Harman (D-Torrance).
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997 | RON HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Is the truth really out there? A handful of scientists listening intently for faint radio signals from distant solar systems are keeping their ears, and minds, open to that possibility. Like their Hollywood counterparts in the movie "Contact," scientists at the SETI Institute hunt for life in space using powerful radio telescopes. SETI, short for Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, is surveying 1,000 stars similar to our sun but light years distant.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators are prepared to approve a plan that will create a new breed of radio stations that can be heard anywhere in the country and will probably be the first pay radio. After five years of work, the Federal Communications Commission is expected to set aside a portion of the airwaves for the service today. The service is to be transmitted nationally or regionally by satellite in digital CD-quality sound, FCC officials said.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1997 | CATHERINE COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The departure lounge in any airport terminal tells the story. Dozens of men and women in suits are clasping cellular phones between ears and shoulders, peering at beepers, scanning electronic calendars and tapping on laptop keyboards. This is personal electronics at its most powerful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1995 | RENE LYNCH and HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal authorities are threatening to rescind precious radio frequencies dedicated for an emergency communications system in Orange County unless the $84-million project meets an October construction deadline, officials said Tuesday. The Federal Communications Commission system requires that at least one field radio be operating by mid-October. Six weeks before that deadline, the county has yet to finalize and sign a contract with Motorola Communications and Electronics Inc., officials said.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defense industry is disappearing and the local economy is in the doldrums, but a young company called Qualcomm, founded by a pair of former computer science professors, is inspiring hope that this city will be lifted by high tech. Qualcomm Inc.'s technology is certainly arcane: Going by the name of Code Division Multiple Access, or CDMA, it's essentially a complicated way of sending digital radio signals over the airwaves.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's budget proposes raising $1 billion a year from a new levy on broadcasters and other users of the nation's airwaves--but the television industry appears confident it can defeat any such measure. The proposal would require that Congress pass legislation to give the Federal Communications Commission the authority to charge user fees for licenses that the agency now allocates to private companies for little or no cost.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Federal regulators Thursday set aside space on the airwaves for a new coast-to-coast radio service that would beam compact disc-quality sound to miniature satellite dishes in cars and homes across the country. The Federal Communications Commission voted to allocate a portion of the nation's radio spectrum for the new technology, which has the potential to broadcast audio programming to every community in the United States, no matter how remote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1994 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday waded into the debate over the health effects of cellular phones, denying a proposed cellular transmission site in Hollywood but approving a similar unit near Marina del Rey. The decision came as activists in a number of communities, citing cancer fears, have delayed or blocked installations of the so-called cell sites, which have been placed on scores of office rooftops--and in some cases schoolyards--to relay cellular phone signals.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration on Thursday freed up a slice of the nation's airwaves for new commercial communications technologies and proposed that an even bigger chunk of government-controlled airwaves be relinquished for future commercial use.
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