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Radio Signals

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1995 | RENE LYNCH and HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal authorities are threatening to rescind precious radio frequencies dedicated for an emergency communications system in Orange County unless the $84-million project meets an October construction deadline, officials said Tuesday. The Federal Communications Commission system requires that at least one field radio be operating by mid-October. Six weeks before that deadline, the county has yet to finalize and sign a contract with Motorola Communications and Electronics Inc., officials said.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defense industry is disappearing and the local economy is in the doldrums, but a young company called Qualcomm, founded by a pair of former computer science professors, is inspiring hope that this city will be lifted by high tech. Qualcomm Inc.'s technology is certainly arcane: Going by the name of Code Division Multiple Access, or CDMA, it's essentially a complicated way of sending digital radio signals over the airwaves.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's budget proposes raising $1 billion a year from a new levy on broadcasters and other users of the nation's airwaves--but the television industry appears confident it can defeat any such measure. The proposal would require that Congress pass legislation to give the Federal Communications Commission the authority to charge user fees for licenses that the agency now allocates to private companies for little or no cost.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Federal regulators Thursday set aside space on the airwaves for a new coast-to-coast radio service that would beam compact disc-quality sound to miniature satellite dishes in cars and homes across the country. The Federal Communications Commission voted to allocate a portion of the nation's radio spectrum for the new technology, which has the potential to broadcast audio programming to every community in the United States, no matter how remote.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration on Thursday freed up a slice of the nation's airwaves for new commercial communications technologies and proposed that an even bigger chunk of government-controlled airwaves be relinquished for future commercial use.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1994 | By JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A promising new video technology, which federal regulators backed a year ago to encourage a lower-cost alternative to cable TV, may be stalled because of a battle with the satellite industry over scarce airwave space. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration says communications satellites will need the same part of the radio airwaves that was planned for use by the video service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
FM radio signals that were silenced in most of Laguna Beach and some other areas this summer after a cable company exchanged them for more local television channels will be available again by December, a cable company official said Thursday. Dimension Cable Co. in August dropped two channels that carried FM radio reception, to make room for additional television channels being required by federal law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 50 cable subscribers upset over losing their FM service got a chance to air their grievances to Dimension Cable officials Thursday night. Although cable officials promised to expand the number of FM stations available on a service that requires a monthly fee, some customers didn't leave the city cable committee meeting happy. Heidi Lemon said she used to get FM stations as far away as New York City. "I listen to FM all the time. . . . It's a tremendous loss," she said.
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