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BUSINESS
March 22, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gritty battle for dominance may be about to erupt in the rarefied atmosphere where communications satellites orbit the Earth. Monday's official announcement that two high-tech moguls want to use low-orbiting satellites to launch a $9-billion global communications system adds a major new player to the increasingly competitive market for global communications services. Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft Corp.
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AUTOS
February 3, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
The Department of Transportation will push the development of a short-range radio system aimed at stopping crashes by allowing cars to exchange basic facts about speed and direction to other vehicles as fast at 10 times a second. Called vehicle-to-vehicle communications, such a system would give vehicles the ability to warn drivers of potential dangers as far as 300 yards away.  The technology could be linked to safety systems already in some vehicles that automatically trigger the brakes or make steering adjustments to stop collisions.  “This is just the beginning of a revolution in roadway safety,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said Monday.
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BUSINESS
March 15, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teledesic Corp., a company owned in part by Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, received federal approval for its ambitious network of 840 satellites that would deliver high-speed data, video, Internet access and phone service to customers worldwide. The Federal Communication Commission's approval of the license came Friday after the agency approved a Clinton administration plan ending a struggle over a block of radio spectrum held by Teledesic, a Kirkland, Wash.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday proposed opening up unused portions of the television airwaves known as "white spaces" to deliver wireless broadband Internet service. The proposal by FCC chief Kevin J. Martin appeals to public interest groups and many of the nation's biggest technology companies, including Google Inc. and Microsoft Corp., which hope it will bring affordable high-speed Internet connections to more Americans.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an ambitious effort to assure women, minorities and small businesses an ownership stake in the burgeoning wireless communications industry, the Federal Communications Commission adopted rules Wednesday that will give those groups special treatment in a multibillion-dollar radio spectrum sale later this year.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2004 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators on Thursday approved a controversial plan to minimize cellphone interference on police and fire radios by moving 13 million customers of Nextel Communications Inc. to a different swath of airwaves. The unanimous decision by the Federal Communications Commission marked a defeat for Verizon Wireless Inc., which had lobbied the agency to auction the disputed frequencies -- worth about $4.8 billion -- instead of "giving" them to Nextel. FCC Chairman Michael K.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1991 | PAUL SAFFO, PAUL SAFFO is a research fellow at the Institute for the Future in Menlo Park, Calif.
In May, the House Energy and Commerce Committee approved a measure aimed at opening a huge chunk of the government radio spectrum to commercial use. The committee's vote was welcome news for companies eager to offer consumers and businesses a host of new wireless information appliances, from inexpensive cordless phones to new kinds of computer networks. These entrepreneurs are stymied by lack of space in the commercial radio spectrum.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resolving a fractious debate, the Federal Communications Commission plans to approve a measure today aimed at speeding the introduction of always-in-touch-communications by slashing the cost of an advanced new wireless network. The plan will also reduce the complexity of "personal communications services" equipment, allowing engineers to design slightly smaller and cheaper portable devices for users to make phone calls and send and receive faxes and other information while on the run.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2007 | From Dow Jones / the Associated Press
Verizon Wireless has launched an appeal against the Federal Communication Commission's final rules for next year's auction of prized radio spectrum, calling them arbitrary and capricious. The company urged the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to strike down rules establishing so-called open-access conditions. It said they exceeded "the commission's authority" and were "unsupported by substantial evidence and otherwise contrary to law."
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton administration has offered to give away a huge, valuable block of the radio spectrum to help several billionaire entrepreneurs, including Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates, resolve a dispute over their competing wireless telephone and Internet services.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2008 | From Reuters
Top bidders put up a total of almost $2.78 billion Thursday in the opening rounds of the Federal Communications Commission's auction of U.S. government-owned airwaves. The figure represents the highest bids received for five blocks of spectrum at the beginning of the auction, which is eventually expected to net the federal government at least $10 billion. Companies qualified to bid include major carriers AT&T Inc. and Verizon Wireless, as well as possible new competitors such as Google Inc.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2007 | From Dow Jones / the Associated Press
Verizon Wireless has launched an appeal against the Federal Communication Commission's final rules for next year's auction of prized radio spectrum, calling them arbitrary and capricious. The company urged the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to strike down rules establishing so-called open-access conditions. It said they exceeded "the commission's authority" and were "unsupported by substantial evidence and otherwise contrary to law."
BUSINESS
September 11, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Apple Inc. may bid for the rights to a wireless spectrum auctioned by the Federal Communications Commission, a risky but intriguing move that would help carry the consumer electronics company into the telecommunications realm. Citing unnamed sources, BusinessWeek reported Monday that Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs had "studied the implications" of bidding on the spectrum, which analog TV broadcasters will return to the government in 2009 as they switch to digital television.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Mexico's Supreme Court struck down a key part of a media law that favored industry heavyweight Televisa. The judges ruled that broadcasters cannot automatically use frequency freed by improved technology to launch telecommunications services and that new concessions shouldn't necessarily go to the highest bidder. The ruling is a loss for Televisa, which has a 70% share of Mexico's TV audience and is one of the country's most powerful companies.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2004 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators on Thursday approved a controversial plan to minimize cellphone interference on police and fire radios by moving 13 million customers of Nextel Communications Inc. to a different swath of airwaves. The unanimous decision by the Federal Communications Commission marked a defeat for Verizon Wireless Inc., which had lobbied the agency to auction the disputed frequencies -- worth about $4.8 billion -- instead of "giving" them to Nextel. FCC Chairman Michael K.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2000 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is director of The 21st Century Project at the University of Texas at Austin. He can be reached at gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu
The obituaries for movie actress Hedy Lamarr, who died at her home in Florida on Jan. 19 at age 86, all mentioned the fact that she co-invented an important technology for radio communications called "frequency hopping." But none of the obituaries described the significance of her invention for current and emerging technologies, or the fact that her intellectual breakthrough will fuel the next great boom in Internet use.
AUTOS
February 3, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
The Department of Transportation will push the development of a short-range radio system aimed at stopping crashes by allowing cars to exchange basic facts about speed and direction to other vehicles as fast at 10 times a second. Called vehicle-to-vehicle communications, such a system would give vehicles the ability to warn drivers of potential dangers as far as 300 yards away.  The technology could be linked to safety systems already in some vehicles that automatically trigger the brakes or make steering adjustments to stop collisions.  “This is just the beginning of a revolution in roadway safety,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said Monday.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2000 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is director of The 21st Century Project at the University of Texas at Austin. He can be reached at gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu
The obituaries for movie actress Hedy Lamarr, who died at her home in Florida on Jan. 19 at age 86, all mentioned the fact that she co-invented an important technology for radio communications called "frequency hopping." But none of the obituaries described the significance of her invention for current and emerging technologies, or the fact that her intellectual breakthrough will fuel the next great boom in Internet use.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1998 | DAVID SEGAL, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Justice Department signed settlements Tuesday with three wireless communications firms, including one in Newport Beach, that were accused of rigging bids during government auctions of radio spectrum licenses. The consent decrees, stemming from suits filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, settle allegations that 21st Century Telesis Corp. of Newport Beach, Omnipoint of Bethesda, Md., and Mercury PCS II LLC of Jacksonville, Miss.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1997 | Reuters
Regulators in Washington began auctioning a slice of spectrum that will let users gain access to the Internet over the airwaves or create wireless local phone networks that compete with traditional wired networks. Twenty-four companies--including units of BellSouth Corp., Pacific Telesis Group, Comcast Corp. and a Bell Atlantic Corp./Nynex Corp. joint venture--are bidding for the rights to offer "wireless communications service." The first day of bidding in the multi-day sale totaled $5.
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