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Radio Stations England

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June 14, 1993 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Swashbuckling businessman Richard Branson has brought a self-proclaimed "radio revolution" to Great Britain with a new national station that would seem--to American ears--anything but revolutionary. Virgin Radio hit the airwaves April 30 with a format devoted to "classic" album-oriented rock of the last 25 years. Lots of Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones and that kind of thing. Not exactly trend-setting sounds--not in this decade, that is.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1993 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Swashbuckling businessman Richard Branson has brought a self-proclaimed "radio revolution" to Great Britain with a new national station that would seem--to American ears--anything but revolutionary. Virgin Radio hit the airwaves April 30 with a format devoted to "classic" album-oriented rock of the last 25 years. Lots of Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones and that kind of thing. Not exactly trend-setting sounds--not in this decade, that is.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
The Rolling Stones and David Bowie were among the musicians who stepped in to help. Robert Plant and Phil Collins wrote a letter to The Times of London. More than 30,000 rock fans signed petitions. But British government officials, listening to the beat of a different drummer, swept aside their arguments in ruling on an issue that recently pushed the nation's music industry toward civil war. Mick Jagger be damned. Rock music and pop music, the British government has declared, are the same thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
The Rolling Stones and David Bowie were among the musicians who stepped in to help. Robert Plant and Phil Collins wrote a letter to The Times of London. More than 30,000 rock fans signed petitions. But British government officials, listening to the beat of a different drummer, swept aside their arguments in ruling on an issue that recently pushed the nation's music industry toward civil war. Mick Jagger be damned. Rock music and pop music, the British government has declared, are the same thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1997 | Robert Hilburn
The decision by Elton John and Bernie Taupin to rewrite "Candle in the Wind" as a eulogy for Princess Diana may seem inspired now, but it was actually the result of a mix-up between the celebrated songwriting team--an indication of how fast the project was accomplished. When composer John phoned lyricist Taupin in California from England to say he'd been asked by Buckingham Palace to sing a song at the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not Depeche Mode. Not the Cure. Not Duran Duran. No, after 18 years as the avatar of '80s music on KROQ-FM (106.7)--first instrumental in launching those and many other bands' U.S. careers, later keeper of the flame with his daily "Flashback Lunch" hour--Richard Blade strayed from his usual playlist as he was choosing the two songs he planned to use to close his final show Thursday.
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