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Radio Stations Finances

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of limping along with depleted funds and a pared-down staff, "CALNET," the statewide public-radio news program patterned after "All Things Considered," has come to an end. It had its final broadcast Wednesday. "We were turned down by our last prospective funder (Wednesday) afternoon," said Rick Lewis, co-creator of "CALNET" and general manager of KLON-FM (88.1) in Long Beach. "There was just no more fuel to go on and we were running on fumes as it was."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Radio personality and onetime Cal State Northridge student Rene Herz Engel has been named general manager of the university's public radio station, KCSN-FM (88.5), college officials announced. William Toutant, associate dean of the College of Arts, Media and Communications, said Engel's experience with college-based radio stations gave him an edge over the competition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking to see why KUSC-FM (91.5) was $500,000 in the red for fiscal 1996, a USC task force has concluded that the public radio station was losing its core audience of classical music listeners. "The fundamental thing was that our audience was basically falling away from us . . . and we weren't attracting a new and different audience," Jane Pisano, the university's vice president of external relations and a member of the task force, said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking to see why KUSC-FM (91.5) was $500,000 in the red for fiscal 1996, a USC task force has concluded that the public radio station was losing its core audience of classical music listeners. "The fundamental thing was that our audience was basically falling away from us . . . and we weren't attracting a new and different audience," Jane Pisano, the university's vice president of external relations and a member of the task force, said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As baseball club owners and striking players struggle for the upper hand in their 8-month-old dispute, broadcasters whose lifeblood is baseball advertising say it matters not who wins or loses, it's how soon they play the game. "If they settle now, this goes from being a disaster to a reasonable beating," said Jim Kalmenson, general manager of Los Angeles radio station KWKW-AM, whose Spanish-language Dodger broadcasts are so popular they are carried by 40 stations in Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public radio station KPCC-FM (89.3) is facing its worst financial crisis ever as a result of what is being described as a $100,000 "accounting error." The station, which is operated by Pasadena City College on an annual budget of about $1 million, was recently found to have less money in its coffers than was thought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
For about 30 years, radio station KCSN-FM (88.5) provided a steady diet of eclectic music and news to listeners in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys from its home at Cal State Northridge. Then came the Jan. 17, 1994, earthquake. The shaken staff relocated to larger, more modern quarters in a student housing complex, and thanks to grants from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Department of Commerce, the public station was able to purchase new broadcasting equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of layoffs and program cuts at KPCC-FM (89.3) stemming from a $100,000 "accounting error," employees at the public-radio station are upset about bearing the brunt of the financial crisis and have accused management of glossing over its responsibility to the public. About 10 station employees--some of them on-air personalities such as Ian Whitcomb and Zoe Walrond--have had their hours reduced, and three others were laid off (but are continuing to work as volunteers).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Radio personality and onetime Cal State Northridge student Rene Herz Engel has been named general manager of the university's public radio station, KCSN-FM (88.5), college officials announced. William Toutant, associate dean of the College of Arts, Media and Communications, said Engel's experience with college-based radio stations gave him an edge over the competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Monica public-radio station KCRW-FM (89.9) enters its spring pledge drive this week bolstered by increased listenership--thanks to the Persian Gulf War--but facing a string of obstacles ranging from the slow economy to increased competition from its neighbor to the northeast, KPCC-FM (89.3) in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The longtime and, in recent years, controversial president and general manager of KUSC-FM (91.5) and its university affiliate radio network has unexpectedly resigned after nearly a quarter-century at the station's helm. Wallace A. Smith said KUSC "needs new ideas and a fresh start." The resignation, announced Friday by the University of Southern California, was effective immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
For about 30 years, radio station KCSN-FM (88.5) provided a steady diet of eclectic music and news to listeners in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys from its home at Cal State Northridge. Then came the Jan. 17, 1994, earthquake. The shaken staff relocated to larger, more modern quarters in a student housing complex, and thanks to grants from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Department of Commerce, the public station was able to purchase new broadcasting equipment.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As baseball club owners and striking players struggle for the upper hand in their 8-month-old dispute, broadcasters whose lifeblood is baseball advertising say it matters not who wins or loses, it's how soon they play the game. "If they settle now, this goes from being a disaster to a reasonable beating," said Jim Kalmenson, general manager of Los Angeles radio station KWKW-AM, whose Spanish-language Dodger broadcasts are so popular they are carried by 40 stations in Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of layoffs and program cuts at KPCC-FM (89.3) stemming from a $100,000 "accounting error," employees at the public-radio station are upset about bearing the brunt of the financial crisis and have accused management of glossing over its responsibility to the public. About 10 station employees--some of them on-air personalities such as Ian Whitcomb and Zoe Walrond--have had their hours reduced, and three others were laid off (but are continuing to work as volunteers).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public radio station KPCC-FM (89.3) is facing its worst financial crisis ever as a result of what is being described as a $100,000 "accounting error." The station, which is operated by Pasadena City College on an annual budget of about $1 million, was recently found to have less money in its coffers than was thought.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Sands, the Santa Monica real estate mogul who last year bought KBLA-AM and introduced an all-business news format, has fired half the radio station's staff of 30 and is shutting down most of its local programming this week. Sands bought KDAY-AM early last year for $7.2 million, renamed the former rap station and instituted the business format to fill what he believed was a niche in the market. Sands said he invested another $2 million upgrading technical equipment and hiring a news staff.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Sands, the Santa Monica real estate mogul who last year bought KBLA-AM and introduced an all-business news format, has fired half the radio station's staff of 30 and is shutting down most of its local programming this week. Sands bought KDAY-AM early last year for $7.2 million, renamed the former rap station and instituted the business format to fill what he believed was a niche in the market. Sands said he invested another $2 million upgrading technical equipment and hiring a news staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The longtime and, in recent years, controversial president and general manager of KUSC-FM (91.5) and its university affiliate radio network has unexpectedly resigned after nearly a quarter-century at the station's helm. Wallace A. Smith said KUSC "needs new ideas and a fresh start." The resignation, announced Friday by the University of Southern California, was effective immediately.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of limping along with depleted funds and a pared-down staff, "CALNET," the statewide public-radio news program patterned after "All Things Considered," has come to an end. It had its final broadcast Wednesday. "We were turned down by our last prospective funder (Wednesday) afternoon," said Rick Lewis, co-creator of "CALNET" and general manager of KLON-FM (88.1) in Long Beach. "There was just no more fuel to go on and we were running on fumes as it was."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Monica public-radio station KCRW-FM (89.9) enters its spring pledge drive this week bolstered by increased listenership--thanks to the Persian Gulf War--but facing a string of obstacles ranging from the slow economy to increased competition from its neighbor to the northeast, KPCC-FM (89.3) in Pasadena.
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