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Radio Stations Florida

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NEWS
June 15, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On any one of a half-dozen Spanish-language radio stations here, today's topic of discussion is Fidel Castro. The Cuban leader was the chief topic yesterday, and he will be the focus on tomorrow's call-in shows, too. For more than a generation, about the only thing more certain than Fidel as the exile community's favorite topic is the South Florida summer weather. And both remain hot.
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NATIONAL
October 25, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, Fla. - It may sound like the type of acerbic election-year conversation happening in coffee shops and dining rooms across the country, but this being radio, everyone sounds a little taller, stronger and more handsome than the rest of us. "How are you going to pay for it?" program host Fernando Miguel Negron asks in Spanish, his voice taking a sonorous bounce. "How can you pay for these government programs and still cut taxes?" "Easily," his guest says. " Fácilmente . " But this is no regular talk radio conversation.
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NEWS
March 25, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A speech by Cuban President Fidel Castro that jammed six South Florida AM radio stations raised concerns about a broadcasting battle over TV Marti, the U.S.-financed station expected to begin beaming programs to Cuba. Susan Kraus, spokeswoman for the National Assn. of Broadcasters, said the Cubans "have the capability of jamming AM stations in more than 30 states."
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A gun-swap organized by an Orlando radio station nearly misfired when local bad guys offered cash instead of sneakers to youths turning in their firearms. Russ Rollins, host of a show on WTKS-FM, persuaded local stores and athletes to donate high-priced sports shoes for the "Kicks for Guns" swap. "Kicks" is slang for "shoes." A block away from the swap site, several people were offering kids cash instead. No arrests were made and 73 guns were turned in for sneakers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
As the Bush Administration attempts to beam its version of world events into Cuba through a satellite transmission called TV-Marti, a group of high-tech progressives in the United States is beaming its view of the propaganda war to American homes.
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A gun-swap organized by an Orlando radio station nearly misfired when local bad guys offered cash instead of sneakers to youths turning in their firearms. Russ Rollins, host of a show on WTKS-FM, persuaded local stores and athletes to donate high-priced sports shoes for the "Kicks for Guns" swap. "Kicks" is slang for "shoes." A block away from the swap site, several people were offering kids cash instead. No arrests were made and 73 guns were turned in for sneakers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government made its first foray into television broadcasting Tuesday, beaming signals to Cuba that the Cuban government promptly jammed. Cuban officials warned of "incalculable consequences" should the U.S. broadcasts continue. "The initiation of tests today by the United States of a television channel in the Spanish language designed against Cuba can have incalculable consequences for almost non-existent bilateral relations," the official Cuban news agency Prensa Latina said.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, Fla. - It may sound like the type of acerbic election-year conversation happening in coffee shops and dining rooms across the country, but this being radio, everyone sounds a little taller, stronger and more handsome than the rest of us. "How are you going to pay for it?" program host Fernando Miguel Negron asks in Spanish, his voice taking a sonorous bounce. "How can you pay for these government programs and still cut taxes?" "Easily," his guest says. " Fácilmente . " But this is no regular talk radio conversation.
NEWS
July 7, 1990
Chapman Shaw Root, 65, former chairman of the country's largest Coca-Cola bottling company and the grandson of the industrialist who designed the Coca-Cola bottle in the early 1900s. Root headed Associated Coca-Cola Bottlers from 1951 until 1982. The company had plants in Pennsylvania, Florida, New York and New Jersey. In 1982, he sold his majority interest in the bottling company to the parent company of Coca-Cola for $417.5 million. Last October, Forbes magazine listed Root as the 389th wealthiest man in America with a net worth of $290 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1985
The Reagan Administration's decision to launch Radio Marti on Monday morning was unfortunate. The station's anti-Fidel Castro broadcasts will worsen U.S. relations with Cuba at a time when most of the other governments in the Western Hemisphere are improving their links to the island. Radio Marti, named after a Cuban hero, is the brainchild of President Reagan's supporters on the political right and in the Cuban-American community.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On any one of a half-dozen Spanish-language radio stations here, today's topic of discussion is Fidel Castro. The Cuban leader was the chief topic yesterday, and he will be the focus on tomorrow's call-in shows, too. For more than a generation, about the only thing more certain than Fidel as the exile community's favorite topic is the South Florida summer weather. And both remain hot.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
As the Bush Administration attempts to beam its version of world events into Cuba through a satellite transmission called TV-Marti, a group of high-tech progressives in the United States is beaming its view of the propaganda war to American homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government made its first foray into television broadcasting Tuesday, beaming signals to Cuba that the Cuban government promptly jammed. Cuban officials warned of "incalculable consequences" should the U.S. broadcasts continue. "The initiation of tests today by the United States of a television channel in the Spanish language designed against Cuba can have incalculable consequences for almost non-existent bilateral relations," the official Cuban news agency Prensa Latina said.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A speech by Cuban President Fidel Castro that jammed six South Florida AM radio stations raised concerns about a broadcasting battle over TV Marti, the U.S.-financed station expected to begin beaming programs to Cuba. Susan Kraus, spokeswoman for the National Assn. of Broadcasters, said the Cubans "have the capability of jamming AM stations in more than 30 states."
SPORTS
July 14, 1995 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Jay Leno's people called. So did the guy who rented him a refrigerator four years ago. So did former UCLA teammate Eric Karros. And so did radio stations from Florida to Los Angeles to his birthplace of Tacoma, Wash. It seems everybody has wanted a piece of Florida Marlin left fielder Jeff Conine since he was selected most valuable player of the All-Star game. "I must have done 50 or 60 interviews since my homer," Conine said. How does that compare to his previous media dealings?
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