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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined to tap into the "truly huge" Latino market, KLYY-FM (107.1) will begin broadcasting contemporary Spanish hits on Monday, including rock en espanol and ballads, said the station's general manager, Sean O'Neill. It has been an English-language alternative rock outlet. The new format is aimed at listeners 25-34, said Bryan Subotnick, executive vice president of Big City Radio, which owns the station.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2010 | By Steve Carney, Special to The Los Angeles Times
Onetime smooth jazz station KTWV-FM (94.7) has been through myriad changes this year, and another is coming Tuesday when morning-show host Brian McKnight is scheduled to announce his departure. McKnight, a multi-platinum R&B star, has also hosted his own TV show, a syndicated radio show, toured the world and is writing a book — a schedule that forces him to prerecord some programs for KTWV. Station management now prefers a live and local host every day. McKnight said that his weekday 6- 9 a.m. show hampered his playing live concerts, except on the weekends.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As any listener to its music can tell you, the Wave, otherwise known as radio station KTWV-FM (94.7), does not make waves. It's mellow, New Age, feel-good butter music. Music that reminds you not of waves crashing against a shore but of the tinkly ripple of a waterfall. Smooth jazz, fans dub it. New adult contemporary, the radio industry calls it. Elevator music, some critics snipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite its somewhat tongue-in-cheek slogan about being "world famous," KROQ-FM (106.7) has not been able to lay claim to being the top-rated radio station in the Los Angeles-Orange County market during its 25-year history. Not, that is, until now. The alternative rock station finally finished first in the recently released Arbitron ratings covering March 29 to June 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He calls himself the Rush Limbaugh of the Afghan community. By day, Farouq Tamiz is a real estate broker in Van Nuys, but every Tuesday night, his voice booms controversy into the homes of thousands of Afghan immigrants living in Southern California. In the eight years since he created the Radio Voice of Afghanistan on KFOX 93.5-FM to protest the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the 47-year-old Kabul native said he has endured threats, nasty letters, even a monthlong suspension by the station.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1997 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last month's high-profile switch by KSCA-FM (101.9) from English-language pop to Spanish-language music brought home to a lot of listeners the phenomenon of the Southland's rapidly changing radio market. Suddenly, you could tune in to 17 Spanish outlets out of 82 stations in Los Angeles and Orange counties--the largest and fastest growing Spanish radio market in the nation. Forty years ago, there was one full-time Spanish-language station here, KWKW-AM (1330).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2000 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listen as KFI-AM (640) news reporter Chris Little tells a story: On Jan. 11, during the 9 p.m. newscast, Little was at a nut factory in Compton. There had been an explosion. Four people were burned, one critically. "Everybody was in there hollering, saying, 'Help, help,' " Ella Brown told Little, her voice riddled with anxiety. She had been watching from across the street, Little told listeners, adding: "She says she heard a small boom, saw a little smoke . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1998 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The actual debut date of his morning show on KFI-AM (640) is lost to immediate memory but, lawyer that he is, Bill Handel in a flash offers that he signed his contract on July 16, 1993--several weeks after the plum 5-9 a.m. gig began.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some listeners tuned to 90.7 FM over the weekend got to hear a new kind of classic rock--the eclectic pop programming of "The Cosmic Barrio" on North Hollywood's KPFK meshed with the classical music of Tijuana's XLNC1. The musical fusion was neither intentional nor easy on the ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG and STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A new station will be hitting the Los Angeles airwaves today, playing an eclectic mix of contemporary rock artists and singer-songwriters with a smattering of folk, soul, blues, reggae and world music in a broadcasting style that hearkens back to the spirit of progressive, underground rock radio of the '60s and '70s. The station will replace the easy-listening KLIT-FM and be located at 101.9 on the dial. (The station is currently in the midst of developing new call letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2000 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two media watchdog groups have called for protests today at 9 a.m. at North Hollywood's KPFK-FM (90.7), as well as four other Pacifica Foundation-owned, listener-supported radio stations nationwide, in response to what they're calling censorship and intimidation of the network's highest-profile journalist. Amy Goodman, award-winning host of "Democracy Now!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some listeners tuned to 90.7 FM over the weekend got to hear a new kind of classic rock--the eclectic pop programming of "The Cosmic Barrio" on North Hollywood's KPFK meshed with the classical music of Tijuana's XLNC1. The musical fusion was neither intentional nor easy on the ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first blush, public radio station KCSN-FM (88.5) is easily dwarfed by its larger brethren of the airwaves. The eclectic station, based at Cal State Northridge, relies on power that's little more than your typical home lightbulb: just 52 watts. But in a case in which size does matter, KCSN is about to amp up its audience reach with a new antenna atop Oat Mountain, high above Porter Ranch in the San Fernando Valley. On Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2000 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listen as KFI-AM (640) news reporter Chris Little tells a story: On Jan. 11, during the 9 p.m. newscast, Little was at a nut factory in Compton. There had been an explosion. Four people were burned, one critically. "Everybody was in there hollering, saying, 'Help, help,' " Ella Brown told Little, her voice riddled with anxiety. She had been watching from across the street, Little told listeners, adding: "She says she heard a small boom, saw a little smoke . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined to tap into the "truly huge" Latino market, KLYY-FM (107.1) will begin broadcasting contemporary Spanish hits on Monday, including rock en espanol and ballads, said the station's general manager, Sean O'Neill. It has been an English-language alternative rock outlet. The new format is aimed at listeners 25-34, said Bryan Subotnick, executive vice president of Big City Radio, which owns the station.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former KFI-AM (640) overnight host Tammy Bruce, who last year came under fire for critical remarks she made on the air about Bill and Camille Cosby, has filed suit against the station and key personnel on charges that include sex discrimination, discrimination due to sexual orientation, wrongful termination, sexual harassment and slander. Named as defendants in the lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, are Cox Radio-owned KFI, Program Director David G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan fielded a few testy calls Wednesday and a lot of friendly ones. He demonstrated his command of details in some of the city's most complicated debates, including charter reform and airport expansion. He bumbled into one awkward, unintended reference to President Clinton's travails, took sharp aim at a member of the City Council, and at one point, broke briefly into song.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With two uncharacteristically flip words on the night of April 22, Michael Jackson stole the talk-radio event at the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills. When someone in the audience asked the panel what was missing from Los Angeles talk radio, Jackson--then doing weekends on KABC-AM (790), having suffered a very public demotion after more than 30 years as a weekday host there--immediately piped up: "Me. Daily." Today at 9 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan fielded a few testy calls Wednesday and a lot of friendly ones. He demonstrated his command of details in some of the city's most complicated debates, including charter reform and airport expansion. He bumbled into one awkward, unintended reference to President Clinton's travails, took sharp aim at a member of the City Council, and at one point, broke briefly into song.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II won't come within 2,000 miles of Los Angeles on his upcoming trip to North America, but that hasn't stopped a majority of Southland television stations from treating the visit as a local story. As a result, seven of the city's 10 news teams are sending reporters to either Mexico or St. Louis to cover the six-day papal tour. Spanish-language outlet KVEA-TV is taking the most aggressive approach, sending a crew of seven including news anchor Jose A.
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