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Radio Stations Los Angeles County

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees and listeners of talk station KFI-AM (640) and adult contemporary music outlet KOST-FM (103.5) can rest easy, but not those of R&B oldies station KACE-FM (103.9). The incoming owner of KFI and KOST has "no plans at this time for changes in the stations' programming or personnel," a spokesman for Dallas-based AMFM Inc. said this week. "Those are great stations," spokesman Joseph N. Jaffoni explained.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending months of turmoil and confusion at public radio station KPCC-FM (89.3), the board of trustees of Pasadena City College voted unanimously Wednesday night to turn over operation of the station to Minnesota Public Radio, which intends to triple the budget and turn it into a major, in-depth local news outlet. The agreement becomes effective Jan. 1 and provides for a six-month transition, during which KPCC will begin hiring up to 10 reporters and producers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in local radio history, Spanish-language stations captured first and second place in the quarterly Arbitron ratings, it was reported Thursday. Together, adult contemporary music outlet KLVE-FM (107.5) and Mexican regional music station KSCA-FM (101.9) account for a considerable 11% chunk of the audience in the 80-plus-station Los Angeles and Orange counties market.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees and listeners of talk station KFI-AM (640) and adult contemporary music outlet KOST-FM (103.5) can rest easy, but not those of R&B oldies station KACE-FM (103.9). The incoming owner of KFI and KOST has "no plans at this time for changes in the stations' programming or personnel," a spokesman for Dallas-based AMFM Inc. said this week. "Those are great stations," spokesman Joseph N. Jaffoni explained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most people tuning in to Los Angeles County's newest radio station will listen for less than a minute, but the station's operators are thrilled to have it that way. That's as long as their program lasts. The new voice on the air waves is Janice Elam, a Castaic Lake Recreation Area lifeguard broadcasting to a limited, but intensely interested, audience--those headed for the county park near Santa Clarita, hoping they can get in.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER and Compiled by David (Doc) Robinson
A few weeks after Los Angeles radio station KKBT-FM (92.3) switched from rock and began playing rhythm and blues this spring, superstar Stevie Wonder went on the air at rival KJLH-FM (102.3) and began telephoning his celebrity friends to counter the new competition. Wonder--who acquired KJLH from a Los Angeles undertaker in 1979--departed from his station's usual mix of music and deejay chatter and traded yarns with everyone from the Rev. Jesse Jackson to singer Little Richard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1993 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antelope Valley will get its own version of shock radio today when listeners tune in to a popular country station and find that it has switched overnight to the valley's first Spanish-language format. KUTY-AM (1470) has long been known for its diet of Garth Brooks and Reba McEntire. Now, the Palmdale station calls itself "Fiesta Latina" and has hired Latino disc jockeys and a Latino program consultant to put together a mix of Mexican music and news shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1990 | PHIL WEST
Some people alter billboards, bus shelter signs and bus benches with graffiti. But KACE-FM (103.9) is using the same forums to deliver an anti-graffiti message. The Inglewood-based radio station, in an effort to draw attention to the city's graffiti menace, is bolstering its outdoor advertising campaign this week to spread the message that the community is sick and tired of spray paint and marking pens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1997 | JOHN DART
The Church on the Way is a Pentecostal megachurch on a roll. On this Fourth of July weekend, the 8,900-member congregation of Senior Pastor Jack Hayford became one of the relatively few churches in the country to operate their own radio station. The Federal Communications Commission gave approval Thursday for the church to begin broadcasting on KTLW-FM, which is at 88.9 in the Antelope Valley and at 91.9 in parts of the Santa Clarita, San Fernando and Simi valleys.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending months of turmoil and confusion at public radio station KPCC-FM (89.3), the board of trustees of Pasadena City College voted unanimously Wednesday night to turn over operation of the station to Minnesota Public Radio, which intends to triple the budget and turn it into a major, in-depth local news outlet. The agreement becomes effective Jan. 1 and provides for a six-month transition, during which KPCC will begin hiring up to 10 reporters and producers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in local radio history, Spanish-language stations captured first and second place in the quarterly Arbitron ratings, it was reported Thursday. Together, adult contemporary music outlet KLVE-FM (107.5) and Mexican regional music station KSCA-FM (101.9) account for a considerable 11% chunk of the audience in the 80-plus-station Los Angeles and Orange counties market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1997 | JOHN DART
The Church on the Way is a Pentecostal megachurch on a roll. On this Fourth of July weekend, the 8,900-member congregation of Senior Pastor Jack Hayford became one of the relatively few churches in the country to operate their own radio station. The Federal Communications Commission gave approval Thursday for the church to begin broadcasting on KTLW-FM, which is at 88.9 in the Antelope Valley and at 91.9 in parts of the Santa Clarita, San Fernando and Simi valleys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1993 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antelope Valley will get its own version of shock radio today when listeners tune in to a popular country station and find that it has switched overnight to the valley's first Spanish-language format. KUTY-AM (1470) has long been known for its diet of Garth Brooks and Reba McEntire. Now, the Palmdale station calls itself "Fiesta Latina" and has hired Latino disc jockeys and a Latino program consultant to put together a mix of Mexican music and news shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most people tuning in to Los Angeles County's newest radio station will listen for less than a minute, but the station's operators are thrilled to have it that way. That's as long as their program lasts. The new voice on the air waves is Janice Elam, a Castaic Lake Recreation Area lifeguard broadcasting to a limited, but intensely interested, audience--those headed for the county park near Santa Clarita, hoping they can get in.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've started the last roundup down at the Radio Ranch. Nobody's out lassoing heifers or steers, though. They're hunting for cash cows. Residents of the Palos Verdes Peninsula are hurrying to raise money so they can save part of a legendary ridge above the Pacific Ocean that for nearly 50 years was Los Angeles' ear to the world. So far, they have managed to keep the historic broadcasting site from completely being covered over with new luxury homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER and Compiled by David (Doc) Robinson
A few weeks after Los Angeles radio station KKBT-FM (92.3) switched from rock and began playing rhythm and blues this spring, superstar Stevie Wonder went on the air at rival KJLH-FM (102.3) and began telephoning his celebrity friends to counter the new competition. Wonder--who acquired KJLH from a Los Angeles undertaker in 1979--departed from his station's usual mix of music and deejay chatter and traded yarns with everyone from the Rev. Jesse Jackson to singer Little Richard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've started the last roundup down at the Radio Ranch. Nobody's out lassoing heifers or steers, though. They're hunting for cash cows. Residents of the Palos Verdes Peninsula are hurrying to raise money so they can save part of a legendary ridge above the Pacific Ocean that for nearly 50 years was Los Angeles' ear to the world. So far, they have managed to keep the historic broadcasting site from completely being covered over with new luxury homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1990 | PHIL WEST
Some people alter billboards, bus shelter signs and bus benches with graffiti. But KACE-FM (103.9) is using the same forums to deliver an anti-graffiti message. The Inglewood-based radio station, in an effort to draw attention to the city's graffiti menace, is bolstering its outdoor advertising campaign this week to spread the message that the community is sick and tired of spray paint and marking pens.
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