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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he were sleepwalking, Mark Shipper could easily stumble into the Pacific Ocean. But at 1:07 in the morning, his fax machine is whirring and his apartment is as Manhattan as Fifth Avenue. The TV is tuned to a New York news channel. The wall clock is set three hours ahead--to Eastern Daylight Time. The fax is bringing in New York's top morning news stories. All the while, Shipper's specially modified telephone is playing a New York radio station over a speaker phone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he were sleepwalking, Mark Shipper could easily stumble into the Pacific Ocean. But at 1:07 in the morning, his fax machine is whirring and his apartment is as Manhattan as Fifth Avenue. The TV is tuned to a New York news channel. The wall clock is set three hours ahead--to Eastern Daylight Time. The fax is bringing in New York's top morning news stories. All the while, Shipper's specially modified telephone is playing a New York radio station over a speaker phone.
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SPORTS
October 1, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
XTRA, the 50,000-watt radio station struggling to find a niche in the competitive Southern California broadcast market, switched to an all-sports format today, company officials said. The station fired its six-person news staff on Friday and began a new format today that includes sports news, a sports magazine show, Lee Hamilton's talk show and a variety of games, said Judy Carlough, the station's new vice president and general manager. "Everything is not set. It's not in its final form.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
At 8 tonight, CBS will begin airing a new comedy called "Trial and Error," the story of two Latino friends in Los Angeles who have followed wildly different career paths--one is an attorney, the other sells T-shirts on Olvera Street.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ and GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Puerto Rican heartthrob Ricky Martin's first all-English-language album landed at No. 1 on the nation's pop music charts Wednesday, and its arrival means more than a boom in dance-floor booty shaking. For a record industry desperate for new sounds and stars, Martin's success is being widely seen as the start of the "Latin crossover phenomenon," whereby Latino artists--U.S.-born and otherwise--who have made names (and millions) for themselves in Spanish are sold on the "mainstream" charts.
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