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Radio Stations Southern California

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choosing from among the more than 80 radio stations in Southern California can be a confusing, even mind-boggling experience. If you're a nostalgic sort, do you tune in to the station "with more of your favorite oldies" (KRTH-FM)? Or to the one with "all oldies all the time" (KRLA-AM)? What about "non-stop oldies" (KODJ-FM)? There's also the option of the "only station for classic rock" (KLSX-FM). And another with "more music, more memories" (KLIT-FM).
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the ominous date of Friday, Aug. 13, a radio station premiered with a staff of one (general manager John Paley), music (a two-hour loop of Persian pop songs) and three commercials (recorded in one take by a Farsi-speaking nutritionist who Paley had just met). Several miles away from the new station, Farzad Fadai, 45, was searching for an afternoon ballgame when his dial scratched over a familiar sound. "Somehow I heard Persian music. I said, 'Wow!'
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I love this!" Haz Montana says with the same kind of enthusiasm Robert Duvall had for napalm in "Apocalypse Now." "I love this format. I love this music. I love being in a radio station that is presented in Spanish. I really do. I don't know why. Maybe I'm a freak." Well, that's a possibility. Let's just say it's rare for the son of Iraqi immigrants, raised in a Jewish neighborhood, to go on to program a Spanish-language radio station in the nation's most competitive market.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2000 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the California primary--the big prize in the Super Tuesday set of 11 primaries--it's a mad dash to beat out the competition. But it's not just the four major presidential candidates who are engaged in last-minute jockeying. Radio stations, talk show producers and hosts across the Southland--at least those who haven't given up in frustration--were working hard over the weekend and into today to land one or more of the prize quartet--Vice President Al Gore, Texas Gov. George W.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KOST-FM is still on a roll. Arbitron reported Tuesday that the easy-listening adult contemporary station continues to be the most listened-to radio station in the area. KOST (103.5) has been at the top of the Southern California ratings heap for the last six quarterly surveys. "We have an uncanny ability to second-guess what adult listeners want," said KOST program director Jhani Kaye. "And, luckily, over all these years we've stayed one step ahead of them."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting a stable marketplace in which most people seem to be set in their listening habits, the Arbitron radio ratings that came out Friday were topped by the same five stations as the previous three-month period. Still in the No. 1 and 2 spots for the Los Angeles-Orange County market--for the fourth quarter in a row--were Spanish-language stations KSCA-FM (101.9), playing Mexican regional music, and KLVE-FM (107.5), featuring adult contemporary music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2000 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the California primary--the big prize in the Super Tuesday set of 11 primaries--it's a mad dash to beat out the competition. But it's not just the four major presidential candidates who are engaged in last-minute jockeying. Radio stations, talk show producers and hosts across the Southland--at least those who haven't given up in frustration--were working hard over the weekend and into today to land one or more of the prize quartet--Vice President Al Gore, Texas Gov. George W.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the ominous date of Friday, Aug. 13, a radio station premiered with a staff of one (general manager John Paley), music (a two-hour loop of Persian pop songs) and three commercials (recorded in one take by a Farsi-speaking nutritionist who Paley had just met). Several miles away from the new station, Farzad Fadai, 45, was searching for an afternoon ballgame when his dial scratched over a familiar sound. "Somehow I heard Persian music. I said, 'Wow!'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1994
Two dozen Spanish-language radio stations in Southern California, including nine in Los Angeles, will join forces today in a 12-hour radio marathon to benefit the Leukemia Society of America. It is a drive not just to raise money for leukemia research, but also to encourage Latinos--who make up 75% of all leukemia patients in Southern California--to donate bone marrow for transplants. "We really need Hispanic donors," said Sam Thomas, senior executive director of the Leukemia Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1993
Orange County customers of a major cellular phone network can now report traffic jams, smog-belching vehicles or taggers defacing public property to a central number, free of charge. PacTel Cellular, competing with rival L.A. Cellular for new customers, as well as seeking to provide useful services, is launching the new PacTel Patrol program with a promotion called Cellular Samaritan Week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting a stable marketplace in which most people seem to be set in their listening habits, the Arbitron radio ratings that came out Friday were topped by the same five stations as the previous three-month period. Still in the No. 1 and 2 spots for the Los Angeles-Orange County market--for the fourth quarter in a row--were Spanish-language stations KSCA-FM (101.9), playing Mexican regional music, and KLVE-FM (107.5), featuring adult contemporary music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I love this!" Haz Montana says with the same kind of enthusiasm Robert Duvall had for napalm in "Apocalypse Now." "I love this format. I love this music. I love being in a radio station that is presented in Spanish. I really do. I don't know why. Maybe I'm a freak." Well, that's a possibility. Let's just say it's rare for the son of Iraqi immigrants, raised in a Jewish neighborhood, to go on to program a Spanish-language radio station in the nation's most competitive market.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KOST-FM is still on a roll. Arbitron reported Tuesday that the easy-listening adult contemporary station continues to be the most listened-to radio station in the area. KOST (103.5) has been at the top of the Southern California ratings heap for the last six quarterly surveys. "We have an uncanny ability to second-guess what adult listeners want," said KOST program director Jhani Kaye. "And, luckily, over all these years we've stayed one step ahead of them."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choosing from among the more than 80 radio stations in Southern California can be a confusing, even mind-boggling experience. If you're a nostalgic sort, do you tune in to the station "with more of your favorite oldies" (KRTH-FM)? Or to the one with "all oldies all the time" (KRLA-AM)? What about "non-stop oldies" (KODJ-FM)? There's also the option of the "only station for classic rock" (KLSX-FM). And another with "more music, more memories" (KLIT-FM).
BUSINESS
February 27, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anthony J. Amaradio, a highly successful Orange County life insurance salesman accused of defrauding customers, was fined $535,000 on Monday and permanently banned from the securities industry. The action by a disciplinary committee of the National Assn. of Securities Dealers stemmed from NASD accusations that the Irvine-based salesman deceived unsophisticated investors into believing they were buying investments similar to mutual funds instead of life insurance policies.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008 | James C. Taylor, Special to The Times
NEW YORK -- Stage lore holds that Shakespeare's "Macbeth" is cursed and that it's best called "the Scottish play" inside the theater to avert bad luck. Even the Metropolitan Opera has historically had troubles mounting Verdi's operatic version. But after a mishap-free run of the Verdi last fall and a seemingly jinxed production of "Tristan and Isolde" this month, it appears that Met insiders would do better by referring to Wagner's masterpiece as "the Cornish opera." Tuesday night did not break the jinx.
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