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Radio Stations Ussr

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NEWS
May 24, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
A new "free" Soviet radio station in Volgograd--the former Stalingrad--is broadcasting Voice of America programming with transmitters once used to jam VOA and other foreign broadcasts, the U.S. agency reported Thursday. Deputy Director Robert Coonrod of the VOA said that Anatoli Yermakov, director of Station VEDO in Volgograd, put the new commercial station on the air May 20 and by next week plans to offer regular Voice of America programming.
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NEWS
May 24, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
A new "free" Soviet radio station in Volgograd--the former Stalingrad--is broadcasting Voice of America programming with transmitters once used to jam VOA and other foreign broadcasts, the U.S. agency reported Thursday. Deputy Director Robert Coonrod of the VOA said that Anatoli Yermakov, director of Station VEDO in Volgograd, put the new commercial station on the air May 20 and by next week plans to offer regular Voice of America programming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER
Hubert Grusnys swivels his chair, flips a switch and leans towards the microphone. "That was the Boomtown Rats," he says in smooth Lithuanian. "And this is radio M-1, your independent music radio station. And now, our review of today's press. . . ." Grusnys may sound like just another disc jockey, but he works for the first independent radio station in the Soviet Union, and he and his colleagues struggled for two years just to get permission to go on the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER
Hubert Grusnys swivels his chair, flips a switch and leans towards the microphone. "That was the Boomtown Rats," he says in smooth Lithuanian. "And this is radio M-1, your independent music radio station. And now, our review of today's press. . . ." Grusnys may sound like just another disc jockey, but he works for the first independent radio station in the Soviet Union, and he and his colleagues struggled for two years just to get permission to go on the air.
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