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Radio Stations

ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1986 | DAVID CROOK, Times Staff Writer
Living on reds, vitamin C and cocaine, All our friends can say is, ' ain't it a shame.' "Truckin'," Grateful Dead Increasing numbers of radio stations are deciding they get no kick from cocaine, reds or any other controlled substance these days. Time was when the nation's radio stations broadcast the youthful cry of "sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll" from Woodstock and Monterey to the beaches of Fort Lauderdale and the poolsides of Palm Springs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
KFYE-FM hasn't budged from the Fresno-area radio dial, but it's about as far as you can get from the Christian music, sermons and Bible stories it was broadcasting until about a week ago. Now it calls itself "Porn Radio" -- "all sex radio, all the time," with a suggestion that people under 21 not listen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2011 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Covering " Carmageddon " is driving some local television and radio stations a bit crazy. One news director bluntly told the traffic reporter not to expect much sleep for the next two days. A news crew from another station will be living in a recreational vehicle near the 405 freeway. Still another station is avoiding using the "C" word in its coverage, hoping that the dire predictions for gridlock will not materialize. Although varied in their approaches, local news stations uniformly are increasing staff, planning live cut-ins and using real-time driving reports and social networking to keep viewers abreast of the impact of the weekend closure.
NEWS
September 19, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government is allowing television and radio stations to suspend routine tests of the emergency alert system this month to avoid creating confusion or fear after last week's terrorist attacks. The Federal Communications Commission will not punish broadcast stations or cable systems for not conducting the required tests before Oct. 2, the agency said.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2000 | Jube Shiver Jr.
A measure that would restrict the addition of 1,000 low-powered FM radio stations was included in a federal spending bill for the District of Columbia. The bill, aimed at curbing a wave of small nonprofit and grass-roots radio stations that might compete against commercial outlets, would require the Federal Communications Commission to impose stricter protections for commercial stations against any electronic interference created by the low-powered stations.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1992
Apogee Communications, a Burbank company owned by Roy P. Disney, said it agreed to acquire two Portland, Ore., radio stations from Ackerley Communications Inc. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Ackerley is a broadcasting and advertising concern headquartered in Seattle. Apogee said the transaction is subject to approval by the Federal Communications Commission. Apogee was formed by Disney last year and recently announced plans to acquire radio stations in the West.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | Reuters
Armed Maoist guerrillas briefly took over two Lima radio stations Tuesday and broadcast an anti-government tape as a wave of political violence sweeping Peru entered its second week, witnesses and police said. Three guerrillas armed with revolvers entered Radio Oriente, and eight rebels forced their way into Radio Excelsior, they said. A police spokesman said the tape they aired contained slogans condemning President Alberto Fujimori's government.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Walt Disney Co. will offer its radio stations through satellite broadcasters Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. Sirius and XM will offer ESPN Radio, Radio Disney and ABC News and Talk, the companies said. Sirius also will offer ESPNews and the "Midnight Cowboy Trucking Show." XM Satellite plans to begin airing as many as 100 channels of news and music from two satellites to U.S. motorists for $9.95 a month by the end of September.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1999 | JUBE SHIVER Jr.
Drawing the ire of commercial broadcasters, federal regulators are taking steps to create a new class of low-powered FM radio stations for small community broadcasters who don't have deep pockets. The Federal Communications Commission last week proposed to license as many as several thousand new 1,000-watt, 100-watt and ultra-low-power (less than 10 watts) radio stations on the FM radio service band. The lowest-power stations would have a service area of only one or two miles.
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