Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRadio Telescope
IN THE NEWS

Radio Telescope

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to The Times
When the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite, into orbit in 1957, its tiny radio transmitter allowed it to be tracked in space. There was only one instrument in the West that could track the intercontinental ballistic missile that launched it, however: the newly opened 250-foot radio telescope at Jodrell Bank in England. And when Sputnik's transmitter died after only 22 days, Jodrell Bank - towering over the English countryside in a small village south of Manchester - was the only instrument that could track it until it fell to Earth three months later.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
January 6, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Using a powerful radio telescope, scientists have spotted an enormous cloud of dust billowing in the center of a supernova - finally. The discovery, announced at the American Astronomical Society, helps to confirm what scientists have long thought - that massive supernova explosions could have provided the dust found in the first galaxies. Early galaxies were dusty places, but where did that dust come from when the universe was still so new? Astronomers hypothesized that supernovae - the end-of-life explosions of stars at least eight times the size of our sun - may have been the source of that ancient, primordial dust.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Bill Gordon, who designed a massive radio telescope in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, arranged funding, shepherded it through construction and was its first director, died Tuesday of natural causes in Ithaca, N.Y. He was 92. Non-astronomers might not be familiar with the name of the Arecibo Observatory, but film buffs will recognize the massive dish, sunk in a limestone sinkhole in the picturesque hills of the island country and was featured in the 1997...
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Carla Hall
When I read Monday that it was the 66th anniversary of the notorious report of a flying disk crashing to Earth on a ranch near Roswell, N.M., sparking endless theories that it was an alien spacecraft, I couldn't help but remember my own summer years ago looking for life in outer space. My search, though, didn't involve hunting down reverse-engineered spacecraft or photographing the sky for strange forms. Instead, I sat at a desk in an astronomer's office at the University of Chicago running a routine data reduction program on radio telescope data and cataloging the basic descriptions of the stars that telescope had been pointed at. And it was more thrilling than scanning the night sky for little green men because this project carried the possibility of really finding something legitimately extraterrestrial.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From Times wire services
In another sign of the warming U.S.-U.S.S.R. relationship, the two countries today announced American participation in a Soviet plan to launch a radio telescope into orbit. The United States will play a role in the RADIOASTRON project, a three- to four-year mission to launch a satellite into orbit in the mid-1990s carrying a radio telescope to probe the universe.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
For astronomer Martha P. Haynes of Cornell University, the strange collapse of a huge radio telescope in West Virginia this week was a devastating loss. "Two years of work just went down the drain," she said in a telephone interview. The 300-foot dish was constructed 26 years ago as an "interim" facility and went on to become a world-class astronomical instrument, but it crashed to the ground Tuesday night, curtailing the work of hundreds of astronomers.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Using what may be the most powerful supercomputer ever assembled, scientists are preparing to electronically link 10 radio telescopes scattered over half a hemisphere into one enormous instrument capable of clearly imaging the deepest recesses of the universe. Astronomers and government officials are scheduled to meet today at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory field station in Socorro, N.M., to dedicate the new $80-million system, called the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2002 | Bettina Boxall and Leslie Carlson, Times Staff Writers
There are few places in California where one can slide as easily into the past as the Inyo Mountains rising at the edge of the Owens Valley. History, geography and climate have conspired to keep the modern age largely at bay. The range is high, empty and dry -- just the place, astronomers believe, to put a highly sophisticated group of radio telescopes to probe the dawn of time and the expansion of space.
NEWS
July 15, 1986
Astronomers for the first time have observed a star in the process of being formed, the University of Arizona announced in Tucson. The embryonic star, one-tenth the size of the sun, was detected 520 light years from Earth in the constellation Ophiuchus, hidden in a galactic cloud of gas, by scientists using a radio telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory 50 miles west of Tucson.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | CASEY COMBS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As the world's most sensitive electronic eardrum, the Green Bank Telescope is expected to pick up signals from outer space that none other has ever heard. The radio telescope, under construction at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, will help map the universe by receiving radio waves more clearly than any other instrument on Earth, said site director Jay Lockman. It will be the largest fully steerable radio telescope when finished in December, 1996.
SCIENCE
July 4, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Strange bursts of radio waves from billions of light-years across the universe have puzzled astronomers for more than half a decade, making them question if the signal was even real. Now, in a paper published by the journal Science, researchers say they think they've figured out a potential explanation: Something cataclysmic. What exact cataclysm is causing them, however - merging stars, dying stars, stars being eaten alive - is still up for serious debate.  The first of the four odd bursts was discovered about six years ago in the southern sky. The extremely bright beams would last for mere milliseconds - a fraction of the blink of an eye - and never reappear, leaving researchers at a loss to explain what was causing such mysterious, singular, blazing bursts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to The Times
When the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite, into orbit in 1957, its tiny radio transmitter allowed it to be tracked in space. There was only one instrument in the West that could track the intercontinental ballistic missile that launched it, however: the newly opened 250-foot radio telescope at Jodrell Bank in England. And when Sputnik's transmitter died after only 22 days, Jodrell Bank - towering over the English countryside in a small village south of Manchester - was the only instrument that could track it until it fell to Earth three months later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Bill Gordon, who designed a massive radio telescope in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, arranged funding, shepherded it through construction and was its first director, died Tuesday of natural causes in Ithaca, N.Y. He was 92. Non-astronomers might not be familiar with the name of the Arecibo Observatory, but film buffs will recognize the massive dish, sunk in a limestone sinkhole in the picturesque hills of the island country and was featured in the 1997...
SCIENCE
July 5, 2008 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
A group of scientists, joined by a member of Congress, used the 100th anniversary of the Tunguska asteroid event this week to draw attention to their belief that the United States is not doing enough to defend the planet against the dangers posed by near-Earth objects. "We are not prepared at this time to prevent the massive death and destruction that would occur if an object from space hit the Earth as it did in Tunguska," said Rep.
NEWS
September 21, 2003 | Andrew Bridges, Associated Press Writer
For the tiny cadre of scientists probing the cosmos for signs of alien life, the most difficult question isn't always, "Are we alone?" Sometimes it's simply, "What do you do?" from a fellow airline passenger. Jill Tarter generally doesn't like to answer that question when she first meets someone. She's director of the Center for SETI Research, as in Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2002 | Bettina Boxall and Leslie Carlson, Times Staff Writers
There are few places in California where one can slide as easily into the past as the Inyo Mountains rising at the edge of the Owens Valley. History, geography and climate have conspired to keep the modern age largely at bay. The range is high, empty and dry -- just the place, astronomers believe, to put a highly sophisticated group of radio telescopes to probe the dawn of time and the expansion of space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1993 | ARTHUR H. ROTSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If a single telescope gives astronomers another eye with which to peer into the heavens, two new state-of-the-art telescopes just inaugurated on Mt. Graham may open a window on the universe. One device, an $8-million radio telescope built for Germany's Max Planck Institute, will look at radiation in the Milky Way and other galaxies seeking the molecular dust and cold gases from which stars are born.
NEWS
March 13, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A huge galaxy with swirling gases that appear to undulate has been identified as possibly the largest galaxy in the universe, scientists reported today. For at least 20 years astronomers thought the galaxy was average in size, probably no bigger than our own Milky Way; but when they examined it recently with a huge radio telescope in New Mexico they learned that it is actually 13 times larger than the Milky Way. Its544434554could not be seen with optical telescopes. The galaxy was measured at 1.
SCIENCE
March 18, 2002 | RAFAEL AGUIRRE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A new peak is rising from this snow-capped volcano--an immense, fabricated cone of reinforced concrete that soon will support the world's largest radio telescope, able to see back nearly to the beginning of time. It has taken 14 years to conceive, design and build so far, and it will be at least two more years before a 160-foot-diameter antenna dish is installed.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | CASEY COMBS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As the world's most sensitive electronic eardrum, the Green Bank Telescope is expected to pick up signals from outer space that none other has ever heard. The radio telescope, under construction at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, will help map the universe by receiving radio waves more clearly than any other instrument on Earth, said site director Jay Lockman. It will be the largest fully steerable radio telescope when finished in December, 1996.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|