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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1987
Let's get our facts straight, shall we ("Storm Blowing Over at KUTE-FM," by Jane Lieberman, Sept. 3)? Lieberman referred to a competing station as KWVE-FM which calls itself "The Wave" and plays "New Age music." In fact, KWVE is a Christian station owned by Calvary Chapel, Costa Mesa, which specializes in middle-of-the-road adult programming and various teachings. KTWV is the station that plays all the innocuous music and has KUTE running scared. I don't care for either of the above, but if a station is going to be described as "bland," let it be the right one. J. BABCOCK-FREDERICKSEN Hermosa Beach
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SCIENCE
July 4, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Strange bursts of radio waves from billions of light-years across the universe have puzzled astronomers for more than half a decade, making them question if the signal was even real. Now, in a paper published by the journal Science, researchers say they think they've figured out a potential explanation: Something cataclysmic. What exact cataclysm is causing them, however - merging stars, dying stars, stars being eaten alive - is still up for serious debate.  The first of the four odd bursts was discovered about six years ago in the southern sky. The extremely bright beams would last for mere milliseconds - a fraction of the blink of an eye - and never reappear, leaving researchers at a loss to explain what was causing such mysterious, singular, blazing bursts.
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NEWS
January 23, 1986 | From Associated Press
The Voyager 2 spacecraft has detected radio emissions from the planet Uranus for the first time, strongly suggesting that the planet has a magnetic field, researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena said today. Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist, said the radio waves are caused by electrons spiraling out from the planet in a distinctive pattern which indicates they are moving along magnetic field lines.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Heinrich Rudolf Hertz -- who, like Van Gogh and Mozart, was a rare genius not fully appreciated during his lifetime -- is honored with a Google Doodle today, his 155th birthday. And perhaps the reason the German physicist wasn't valued for his work was that no one at that point was smart enough to do so. Even Hertz didn't get it. The German physicist, who was the first to broadcast and receive radio waves, did not realize at the time the broader implications of his work -- which laid the groundwork for the invention of the wireless telegraph, radio and TV. GALLERY: Evolution of the doodle "I do not think that the wireless waves I have discovered will have any practical application," Hertz once wrote , according to Scotland's University of St. Andrews.
SCIENCE
March 5, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A powerful burst of radio waves from near the center of our galaxy may have come from a previously unknown type of space object, U.S. astronomers reported in the journal Nature. Some experts nicknamed the mysterious source a "burper." Radio telescope observations revealed multiple bursts from the source during a seven-hour period from Sept. 30 to Oct. 1, 2002 -- five bursts repeating at remarkably constant intervals.
NEWS
September 3, 2001
Low-frequency radio waves can kill zebra mussels, which cause millions of dollars in damage by clogging water intake pipes at power plants and other installations, researchers reported Tuesday at an American Chemical Society meeting. Zebra mussels in an aquarium that were exposed to very low frequency electromagnetic waves--about 60 hertz, similar to what is emitted by a power outlet--died within 40 days, according to researchers from Purdue University-Calumet in Hammond, Ind.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apple Computer Inc. on Monday asked the Federal Communications Commission to set aside a small portion of the radio frequency spectrum to allow personal computers to communicate over radio waves instead of over telephone lines. The petition seeks the spectrum allocation on behalf of all computer manufacturers that might someday participate in the emerging field of so-called wireless computing, a technology many experts consider to be key to the next generation of personal computers.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | Associated Press
Astronauts aboard the shuttle Atlantis on Wednesday fired up an electron beam gun that will be used to create artificial auroras over the Southern Hemisphere and low-frequency radio waves. Tens of thousands of students worldwide, equipped with special receivers, will spend the next week listening for the radio waves. The shuttle and its crew of seven blasted off Tuesday from Kennedy Space Center on an eight-day mission to study Earth's fragile ozone layer and other aspects of the atmosphere.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1994 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER
Wireless computer networks hold the promise of eliminating expensive wiring and cabling in office complexes and granting the flexibility to move equipment around without rewiring. But transmitting interference-free radio signals within buildings is a complex engineering problem. A new software package developed by engineers at Georgia Tech Research Institute to predict how radio waves transmit and reflect inside structures could help solve this problem.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Scientists probing Mercury's surface with radio waves now believe that the closest planet to the sun has a hot equator but no internal heat source, as previously thought. They have no clues as to what makes up the interior of Mercury. Last year, the astronomers, from the University of New Mexico and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, probed Mercury with radio wave-emitting equipment. They found that Mercury's erratic orbit, which swings it from 28.5 million miles to 43.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
In the skies above Libya, the U.S. Navy has been deploying a small fleet of supersonic EA-18 Growler jets to "jam" Moammar Kadafi's ground radar, giving NATO fighters and bombers free rein to strike tanks, communication depots and other strategic targets. It's the latest demonstration of "electronic attack" hardware — the "EA" in the Growler's name. Armies have been waging electronic warfare since World War II, but today's technology packs a strategic wallop unforeseen even a decade ago. With foreign adversaries continuing to improve their radar capabilities and air defense networks, and terrorists worldwide using modern consumer electronics to trigger explosives, the United States is spending billions of dollars in a massive effort to respond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Robert Helliwell, a Stanford electrical engineer whose study of radio waves emitted by lightning opened a new window to understanding the upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere, died May 3 in Palo Alto of complications of dementia. He was 90. Helliwell specialized in bouncing radio waves off the ionized particles in the upper atmosphere, transmitting them over long distances to deduce the structure of those upper layers. Among other things, he showed that the Earth's ionosphere, an envelope of electrons and charged atoms and molecules beginning about 36 miles above the Earth's surface, actually extends as high as 20,000 miles, not the 200 miles researchers had previously believed.
HEALTH
November 29, 2010 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
"Private Practice" 10 p.m. Nov. 18, ABC Episode: "Can't Find My Way Back Home" The Premise: Sharon, a widow in her 40s, has been having severe seizures for more than seven years. Neurosurgeon Amelia Shepherd (Caterina Scorsone) is able to locate the scar from an old brain lesion that is causing the seizures, and she offers to insert a probe that will emit "radio waves to heat and ablate the scar. " Amelia tells Sharon that the repeated seizures will result in brain damage over 10 to 15 years if left untreated.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2010 | By Diane Fisher
Though there's much to me you never will see I surround you and pound you. You never can flee. Without me you'd starve, be blinded and cold. The oceans would freeze and darkness take hold. I am light! And very little of me Is all that your poor eyes ever will see. You will never make out the radio waves From broadcasting towers and cell phones . . . and space. The infrared rays from the warmth of your knuckles Look as dim to you as those from your buckles.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Two radio station towers near Seattle that have generated intense local opposition were toppled in an act of sabotage that bore the initials of the radical Earth Liberation Front. The towers for KRKO-AM -- one of which was 349 feet tall -- were torn down because of health and environmental concerns, according to an e-mail from the North American ELF Press Office, which has represented the shadowy group in the past. "We have to weigh our priorities, and the local ecosystem in Everett, along with the local residents, do not need additional sports news radio station towers that come at the expense of reduced property values and harmful radio waves," ELF press office spokesman Jason Crawford said in the e-mail.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. for decades has generated power for its customers by splitting atoms, burning natural gas and capturing the force of falling water. More recently, the San Francisco utility began turning to the sun, wind, boiling geysers and even fermented cow manure to produce electricity. Now, PG&E wants to turn to outer space. A Manhattan Beach start-up called Solaren Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Zapping nerves in the neck with radio waves can temporarily relieve the pain of whiplash, Australian doctors report in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers found that the three-hour treatment, called percutaneous radio-frequency neurotomy, could make the pain go away for more than a year. Eventually, though, the procedure had to be repeated when the nerves grew back.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | HARTFORD COURANT
Radio frequency signals, like Joan Rivers, don't know when to go away. They're in the air everywhere, emitted by cellular phones, TV remote controls, microwave ovens and garage-door openers. Anything with a transmitter--and, for all you amateur sleuths, that includes surveillance cameras and hidden microphones--sends out radio waves into the atmosphere. A tiny $16 device called RF Bug, imported by NCG Co. of Anaheim, sniffs out strong radio frequency signals.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2007 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
When doctors told John Kanzius he had nine months to live, he quietly thanked God for his blessings and prepared to die. Then 58, he had lived a good life, with a loving wife, two successful adult daughters and a gratifying career. Now he had leukemia and was ready to accept his fate, but the visits to the cancer ward shook him. Faces haunted him, the bald and bandaged heads, bodies slumped in wheelchairs, and children who could not play.
HEALTH
May 28, 2007 | Roy M. Wallack
Could it be possible that the most fun a human being can have in this lifetime -- going to the beach -- has become more fun? With these innovative takes on summertime games, old favorites such as boogie-boarding, Frisbee-throwing, volleyball and snorkeling are even better than they used to be. -- Roy M. Wallack Slicing its way through the waves WaveSkater Body Board: Highly maneuverable, shaped boogie board.
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