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Radioactive Company

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BUSINESS
March 8, 2001 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's no secret that the music industry hates Napster. But how will it feel about RadioActive? RadioActive is just one of what is almost certain to be a swarm of Web-based music services aiming to satisfy users' thirst for downloadable music without drawing legal gunfire from the recording industry. Scheduled to be released for public use Monday, RadioActive (http://www.radioactive.com) works by scanning as many as 1,500 Internet radio stations.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2001 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's no secret that the music industry hates Napster. But how will it feel about RadioActive? RadioActive is just one of what is almost certain to be a swarm of Web-based music services aiming to satisfy users' thirst for downloadable music without drawing legal gunfire from the recording industry. Scheduled to be released for public use Monday, RadioActive (http://www.radioactive.com) works by scanning as many as 1,500 Internet radio stations.
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NEWS
April 15, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
The owner of a dormant radioactive chemicals company was charged Tuesday with five counts of violating state radiation safety regulations, including the storage of radioactive materials without a license and preventing health authorities from inspecting the Los Angeles plant. The plant, near the interchange of the Golden State and Glendale freeways, is near several homes, and authorities said they believe that radioactive Carbon 14 and Tritium are still being illegally stored at the plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2006 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
A new radiation detector that could improve the screening of U.S.-bound cargo containers for nuclear weapons will undergo full-scale testing in the Port of Oakland, developers of the technology announced this week. VeriTainer Corp., a Bay Area firm, will equip the Matson Navigation Co. terminal with scanners that attach to the hoisting mechanism of towering cranes that serve container ships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The industrial park along South Santa Fe Avenue between Vista and San Marcos is like so many others in North County: acres of identically shaped and designed, one-story buildings housing innocuous businesses. An upholstery shop, a towing company, a machine shop . . . and a "nuke waste dump," as one North County newspaper identified it over the weekend. "What else has the state approved that we don't know about?" fumed Vista Mayor Gloria McClellan. "I don't like this at all."
BUSINESS
April 30, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How much should General Motors Corp. spend to keep people from burning to death in fiery crashes? In a memo nearly 30 years ago, a young GM engineer, Edward C. Ivey, suggested that the answer was: Not much. With a couple of simple calculations, Ivey estimated that these fiery deaths were costing GM only about $2 per vehicle--the implication being that it was not enough to justify the expense of changing the vehicles' design. Ivey didn't know it at the time, but he was planting a legal time bomb.
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